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Environmental dermatology: skin manifestations of injuries caused by invertebrate aquatic animals.

Haddad V - An Bras Dermatol (2013 Jul-Aug)

Bottom Line: Contact between humans and coastal areas has increased in recent decades, which has led to an increase in injuries from aquatic animals.The majority of these present dermatological manifestations, and some of them show typical lesions.The highest percentages of injuries that occur in marine environments are associated with invertebrates such as sea urchins, jellyfish and Portuguese men-of-war (echinoderms and cnidarians).

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ABSTRACT
Contact between humans and coastal areas has increased in recent decades, which has led to an increase in injuries from aquatic animals. The majority of these present dermatological manifestations, and some of them show typical lesions. The highest percentages of injuries that occur in marine environments are associated with invertebrates such as sea urchins, jellyfish and Portuguese men-of-war (echinoderms and cnidarians). In this review, we discuss the clinical, therapeutic and preventive aspects of injuries caused by marine and freshwater invertebrates, focusing on first aid measures and diagnosis for dermatologists and professionals in coastal areas.

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Conus regius and Octopus sp., the commonoctopus. Photos: Vidal Haddad Junior
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f08: Conus regius and Octopus sp., the commonoctopus. Photos: Vidal Haddad Junior

Mentions: The most venomous species of Conus feed on fish. In Brazil, mostspecies feed on worms and other mollusks. Some well-known species such as Conusclerii, Conus regius and Conus jaspideus, depend on thecapture of polychaetes (Figure 8). There are twoAtlantic Ocean species of large diameter: Conus centurio andConus ermineus, the latter being clearly piscivorous.27 Recently, an accident caused byConus regius was reported in Brazil.28


Environmental dermatology: skin manifestations of injuries caused by invertebrate aquatic animals.

Haddad V - An Bras Dermatol (2013 Jul-Aug)

Conus regius and Octopus sp., the commonoctopus. Photos: Vidal Haddad Junior
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3760923&req=5

f08: Conus regius and Octopus sp., the commonoctopus. Photos: Vidal Haddad Junior
Mentions: The most venomous species of Conus feed on fish. In Brazil, mostspecies feed on worms and other mollusks. Some well-known species such as Conusclerii, Conus regius and Conus jaspideus, depend on thecapture of polychaetes (Figure 8). There are twoAtlantic Ocean species of large diameter: Conus centurio andConus ermineus, the latter being clearly piscivorous.27 Recently, an accident caused byConus regius was reported in Brazil.28

Bottom Line: Contact between humans and coastal areas has increased in recent decades, which has led to an increase in injuries from aquatic animals.The majority of these present dermatological manifestations, and some of them show typical lesions.The highest percentages of injuries that occur in marine environments are associated with invertebrates such as sea urchins, jellyfish and Portuguese men-of-war (echinoderms and cnidarians).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Contact between humans and coastal areas has increased in recent decades, which has led to an increase in injuries from aquatic animals. The majority of these present dermatological manifestations, and some of them show typical lesions. The highest percentages of injuries that occur in marine environments are associated with invertebrates such as sea urchins, jellyfish and Portuguese men-of-war (echinoderms and cnidarians). In this review, we discuss the clinical, therapeutic and preventive aspects of injuries caused by marine and freshwater invertebrates, focusing on first aid measures and diagnosis for dermatologists and professionals in coastal areas.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus