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The latest succession of dinosaur tracksites in Europe: Hadrosaur ichnology, track production and palaeoenvironments.

Vila B, Oms O, Fondevilla V, Gaete R, Galobart A, Riera V, Canudo JI - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The hadrosaur tracks are significantly smaller in size than, but morphologically similar to, those of North America and Asia and are attributable to the ichnogenus Hadrosauropodus.The track succession, with more than 40 distinct track levels, indicates that hadrosaur footprints in the Ibero-Armorican region occur predominantly in the late Maaastrichtian (at least above the early Maastrichtian-late Maastrichtian boundary).The highest abundance is found noticeably found in the late Maastrichtian, with tracks occurring in the C29r magnetochron, within about the latest 300,000 years of the Cretaceous.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Grupo Aragosaurus-IUCA, Paleontología, Facultad de Ciencias Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain ; Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
A comprehensive review and study of the rich dinosaur track record of the Tremp Formation in the southern Pyrenees of Spain (Southwestern Europe) shows a unique succession of footprint localities prior to the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event. A description of some 30 new tracksites and data on sedimentary environments, track occurrence and preservation, ichnology and chronostratigraphy are provided. These new track localities represent various facies types within a diverse set of fluvial environments. The footprint discoveries mostly represent hadrosaurian and, less abundantly, to sauropod dinosaurs. The hadrosaur tracks are significantly smaller in size than, but morphologically similar to, those of North America and Asia and are attributable to the ichnogenus Hadrosauropodus. The track succession, with more than 40 distinct track levels, indicates that hadrosaur footprints in the Ibero-Armorican region occur predominantly in the late Maaastrichtian (at least above the early Maastrichtian-late Maastrichtian boundary). The highest abundance is found noticeably found in the late Maastrichtian, with tracks occurring in the C29r magnetochron, within about the latest 300,000 years of the Cretaceous.

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Hadrosaur trackways in southwestern Europe.(A, B, and D) Bipedal trackways from the Areny 1, Moror B, and Sierra de los Gavilanes tracksites (redrawn from Barco et al. [19], Llompart [18], and Herrero-Santos, [24], respectively). (C) Quadrupedal trackway from the La Mata del Viudà tracksite.
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pone-0072579-g008: Hadrosaur trackways in southwestern Europe.(A, B, and D) Bipedal trackways from the Areny 1, Moror B, and Sierra de los Gavilanes tracksites (redrawn from Barco et al. [19], Llompart [18], and Herrero-Santos, [24], respectively). (C) Quadrupedal trackway from the La Mata del Viudà tracksite.

Mentions: Hadrosaur trackways are rare in Europe and mostly show bipedal locomotion (Fig. 8). In bipedal patterns (Fig. 8A, B and D) the pedal tracks are rotated inwards and exhibit a moderately high pace angulation (∼144–166°) and a short stride (SL ∼4.5TL). At the La Mata del Viudà locality, Llompart [17] and López-Martínez et al. [20] suggested that at least three of the pedal tracks were arranged in a trackway but no further measurements or maps were provided. The present study provides a detailed map of the whole surface and the relevant measurements of this trackway (Fig. 8C). The trackway consists of three pedal tracks with corresponding manus tracks, thus indicating a walking hadrosaur with a quadrupedal gait. Notably, the quadrupedal trackway from the La Mata del Viudà locality shows a high pace angulation value (174°) and a long stride (SL∼8TL). Another example of a quadrupedal hadrosaur trackway in the Tremp Formation is at the La Pleta Nord locality, where a sequence of natural casts comprising three large pedes and one manus are aligned to form a trackway (Fig. 3E); the cross-sectional outcrop view prevents descriptions and measurements.


The latest succession of dinosaur tracksites in Europe: Hadrosaur ichnology, track production and palaeoenvironments.

Vila B, Oms O, Fondevilla V, Gaete R, Galobart A, Riera V, Canudo JI - PLoS ONE (2013)

Hadrosaur trackways in southwestern Europe.(A, B, and D) Bipedal trackways from the Areny 1, Moror B, and Sierra de los Gavilanes tracksites (redrawn from Barco et al. [19], Llompart [18], and Herrero-Santos, [24], respectively). (C) Quadrupedal trackway from the La Mata del Viudà tracksite.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3760888&req=5

pone-0072579-g008: Hadrosaur trackways in southwestern Europe.(A, B, and D) Bipedal trackways from the Areny 1, Moror B, and Sierra de los Gavilanes tracksites (redrawn from Barco et al. [19], Llompart [18], and Herrero-Santos, [24], respectively). (C) Quadrupedal trackway from the La Mata del Viudà tracksite.
Mentions: Hadrosaur trackways are rare in Europe and mostly show bipedal locomotion (Fig. 8). In bipedal patterns (Fig. 8A, B and D) the pedal tracks are rotated inwards and exhibit a moderately high pace angulation (∼144–166°) and a short stride (SL ∼4.5TL). At the La Mata del Viudà locality, Llompart [17] and López-Martínez et al. [20] suggested that at least three of the pedal tracks were arranged in a trackway but no further measurements or maps were provided. The present study provides a detailed map of the whole surface and the relevant measurements of this trackway (Fig. 8C). The trackway consists of three pedal tracks with corresponding manus tracks, thus indicating a walking hadrosaur with a quadrupedal gait. Notably, the quadrupedal trackway from the La Mata del Viudà locality shows a high pace angulation value (174°) and a long stride (SL∼8TL). Another example of a quadrupedal hadrosaur trackway in the Tremp Formation is at the La Pleta Nord locality, where a sequence of natural casts comprising three large pedes and one manus are aligned to form a trackway (Fig. 3E); the cross-sectional outcrop view prevents descriptions and measurements.

Bottom Line: The hadrosaur tracks are significantly smaller in size than, but morphologically similar to, those of North America and Asia and are attributable to the ichnogenus Hadrosauropodus.The track succession, with more than 40 distinct track levels, indicates that hadrosaur footprints in the Ibero-Armorican region occur predominantly in the late Maaastrichtian (at least above the early Maastrichtian-late Maastrichtian boundary).The highest abundance is found noticeably found in the late Maastrichtian, with tracks occurring in the C29r magnetochron, within about the latest 300,000 years of the Cretaceous.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Grupo Aragosaurus-IUCA, Paleontología, Facultad de Ciencias Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain ; Institut Català de Paleontologia Miquel Crusafont, Sabadell, Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
A comprehensive review and study of the rich dinosaur track record of the Tremp Formation in the southern Pyrenees of Spain (Southwestern Europe) shows a unique succession of footprint localities prior to the end-Cretaceous mass extinction event. A description of some 30 new tracksites and data on sedimentary environments, track occurrence and preservation, ichnology and chronostratigraphy are provided. These new track localities represent various facies types within a diverse set of fluvial environments. The footprint discoveries mostly represent hadrosaurian and, less abundantly, to sauropod dinosaurs. The hadrosaur tracks are significantly smaller in size than, but morphologically similar to, those of North America and Asia and are attributable to the ichnogenus Hadrosauropodus. The track succession, with more than 40 distinct track levels, indicates that hadrosaur footprints in the Ibero-Armorican region occur predominantly in the late Maaastrichtian (at least above the early Maastrichtian-late Maastrichtian boundary). The highest abundance is found noticeably found in the late Maastrichtian, with tracks occurring in the C29r magnetochron, within about the latest 300,000 years of the Cretaceous.

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