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The role of tumour stroma in colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis.

Conti J, Thomas G - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: It is now apparent that tumour stroma plays an important role in promoting tumour progression.A pronounced desmoplastic reaction was associated with a reduced immune response and has been shown to be an independent poor prognostic indicator in CRC and cancer recurrence.Determining the cause(s) and effect(s) of this stromal response will further our understanding of tumour cell/stromal interactions, and will help us identify prognostic indicators for patients with CRC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Sciences Division, Southampton University, Somers Building, Southampton General Hospital, Mailpoint 824, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. jaconti1@soton.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality in western society with a 5-year survival of approximately 50%. Metastasis to the liver and lungs is the principal cause of death and occurs in up to 25% of patients at presentation. Despite advances in available techniques for treating metastases, the majority of patients remain incurable and existing adjuvant therapies such as chemotherapy are only of limited effectiveness. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic process may allow us to identify those at greatest risk of recurrence and discover new tumour targets to prevent disease progression. It is now apparent that tumour stroma plays an important role in promoting tumour progression. A pronounced desmoplastic reaction was associated with a reduced immune response and has been shown to be an independent poor prognostic indicator in CRC and cancer recurrence. Determining the cause(s) and effect(s) of this stromal response will further our understanding of tumour cell/stromal interactions, and will help us identify prognostic indicators for patients with CRC. This will not only allow us to target our existing treatments more effectively, we also aim to identify novel and more specific therapeutic targets for the treatment of CRC which will add to our current therapeutic options.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The role of the stroma in CRC development. Matrix deposition and turnover occurs simultaneously, as does the release of cytokines/factors which stimulate angiogenesis and alter immune function. This allows the colorectal cancer to grow and metastasise.
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f2-cancers-03-02160: The role of the stroma in CRC development. Matrix deposition and turnover occurs simultaneously, as does the release of cytokines/factors which stimulate angiogenesis and alter immune function. This allows the colorectal cancer to grow and metastasise.

Mentions: A possible model for stromal and CRC interactions is shown below (Figure 2).


The role of tumour stroma in colorectal cancer invasion and metastasis.

Conti J, Thomas G - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

The role of the stroma in CRC development. Matrix deposition and turnover occurs simultaneously, as does the release of cytokines/factors which stimulate angiogenesis and alter immune function. This allows the colorectal cancer to grow and metastasise.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3757409&req=5

f2-cancers-03-02160: The role of the stroma in CRC development. Matrix deposition and turnover occurs simultaneously, as does the release of cytokines/factors which stimulate angiogenesis and alter immune function. This allows the colorectal cancer to grow and metastasise.
Mentions: A possible model for stromal and CRC interactions is shown below (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: It is now apparent that tumour stroma plays an important role in promoting tumour progression.A pronounced desmoplastic reaction was associated with a reduced immune response and has been shown to be an independent poor prognostic indicator in CRC and cancer recurrence.Determining the cause(s) and effect(s) of this stromal response will further our understanding of tumour cell/stromal interactions, and will help us identify prognostic indicators for patients with CRC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Sciences Division, Southampton University, Somers Building, Southampton General Hospital, Mailpoint 824, Tremona Road, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. jaconti1@soton.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of mortality in western society with a 5-year survival of approximately 50%. Metastasis to the liver and lungs is the principal cause of death and occurs in up to 25% of patients at presentation. Despite advances in available techniques for treating metastases, the majority of patients remain incurable and existing adjuvant therapies such as chemotherapy are only of limited effectiveness. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic process may allow us to identify those at greatest risk of recurrence and discover new tumour targets to prevent disease progression. It is now apparent that tumour stroma plays an important role in promoting tumour progression. A pronounced desmoplastic reaction was associated with a reduced immune response and has been shown to be an independent poor prognostic indicator in CRC and cancer recurrence. Determining the cause(s) and effect(s) of this stromal response will further our understanding of tumour cell/stromal interactions, and will help us identify prognostic indicators for patients with CRC. This will not only allow us to target our existing treatments more effectively, we also aim to identify novel and more specific therapeutic targets for the treatment of CRC which will add to our current therapeutic options.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus