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Diversity and functional significance of cellulolytic microbes living in termite, pill-bug and stem-borer guts.

Bashir Z, Kondapalli VK, Adlakha N, Sharma A, Bhatnagar RK, Chandel G, Yazdani SS - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Most of the carboxymethylcellulase positive strains also hydrolysed other amorphous substrates such as xylan, locust bean gum and β-D-glucan.Two strains, A11 and A21, demonstrated significant activity towards Avicel and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobiose, indicating that they express cellobiohydrolase.These results provide insight into the co-existence of symbionts in the guts of arthropods and their possible exploitation for the production of fuels and chemicals derived from plant biomass.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Synthetic Biology and Biofuels Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Arthropods living on plants are able to digest plant biomass with the help of microbial flora in their guts. This study considered three arthropods from different niches - termites, pill-bugs and yellow stem-borers - and screened their guts for cellulase producing microbes. Among 42 unique cellulase-producing strains, 50% belonged to Bacillaceae, 26% belonged to Enterobacteriaceae, 17% belonged to Microbacteriaceae, 5% belonged to Paenibacillaceae and 2% belonged to Promicromonosporaceae. The distribution of microbial families in the three arthropod guts reflected differences in their food consumption habits. Most of the carboxymethylcellulase positive strains also hydrolysed other amorphous substrates such as xylan, locust bean gum and β-D-glucan. Two strains, A11 and A21, demonstrated significant activity towards Avicel and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobiose, indicating that they express cellobiohydrolase. These results provide insight into the co-existence of symbionts in the guts of arthropods and their possible exploitation for the production of fuels and chemicals derived from plant biomass.

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Classification and phylogenetic analysis of natural isolates from the guts of termites, pill-bugs and yellow stem-borers.(A) 16s rDNA sequences of 42 isolates screened for their ability to produce cellulolytic enzymes obtained from the guts of termites (), pill bugs () and yellow stem borers () were used to perform blast searches to identify their nearest neighbors, and MEGA5 was used to construct the phylogenetic tree. The natural isolates were found to belong to five families. (B) Relative abundance of various bacterial families in the guts of these three arthropods.
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f2: Classification and phylogenetic analysis of natural isolates from the guts of termites, pill-bugs and yellow stem-borers.(A) 16s rDNA sequences of 42 isolates screened for their ability to produce cellulolytic enzymes obtained from the guts of termites (), pill bugs () and yellow stem borers () were used to perform blast searches to identify their nearest neighbors, and MEGA5 was used to construct the phylogenetic tree. The natural isolates were found to belong to five families. (B) Relative abundance of various bacterial families in the guts of these three arthropods.

Mentions: Among the 42 bacterial colonies selected for further characterisation, 17 were isolated from termite guts, 8 were isolated from pill-bug guts and 17 were isolated from yellow stem borer guts (Table 1). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences revealed that all identified bacterial species belonged to five families - 50% belonged to Bacillaceae, 26% belonged to Enterobacteriaceae, 17% belonged to Microbacteriaceae, 5% belonged to Paenibacillaceae and 2% belonged to Promicromonosporaceae (Figure 2A). Between 60 and 70% of the bacteria from the guts of termites and pill-bugs were from the Bacillaceae family, while bacteria from the Microbacteriaceae and Enterobacteriaceae families were more dominant in the guts of yellow stem borers (Figure 2B).


Diversity and functional significance of cellulolytic microbes living in termite, pill-bug and stem-borer guts.

Bashir Z, Kondapalli VK, Adlakha N, Sharma A, Bhatnagar RK, Chandel G, Yazdani SS - Sci Rep (2013)

Classification and phylogenetic analysis of natural isolates from the guts of termites, pill-bugs and yellow stem-borers.(A) 16s rDNA sequences of 42 isolates screened for their ability to produce cellulolytic enzymes obtained from the guts of termites (), pill bugs () and yellow stem borers () were used to perform blast searches to identify their nearest neighbors, and MEGA5 was used to construct the phylogenetic tree. The natural isolates were found to belong to five families. (B) Relative abundance of various bacterial families in the guts of these three arthropods.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3757366&req=5

f2: Classification and phylogenetic analysis of natural isolates from the guts of termites, pill-bugs and yellow stem-borers.(A) 16s rDNA sequences of 42 isolates screened for their ability to produce cellulolytic enzymes obtained from the guts of termites (), pill bugs () and yellow stem borers () were used to perform blast searches to identify their nearest neighbors, and MEGA5 was used to construct the phylogenetic tree. The natural isolates were found to belong to five families. (B) Relative abundance of various bacterial families in the guts of these three arthropods.
Mentions: Among the 42 bacterial colonies selected for further characterisation, 17 were isolated from termite guts, 8 were isolated from pill-bug guts and 17 were isolated from yellow stem borer guts (Table 1). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences revealed that all identified bacterial species belonged to five families - 50% belonged to Bacillaceae, 26% belonged to Enterobacteriaceae, 17% belonged to Microbacteriaceae, 5% belonged to Paenibacillaceae and 2% belonged to Promicromonosporaceae (Figure 2A). Between 60 and 70% of the bacteria from the guts of termites and pill-bugs were from the Bacillaceae family, while bacteria from the Microbacteriaceae and Enterobacteriaceae families were more dominant in the guts of yellow stem borers (Figure 2B).

Bottom Line: Most of the carboxymethylcellulase positive strains also hydrolysed other amorphous substrates such as xylan, locust bean gum and β-D-glucan.Two strains, A11 and A21, demonstrated significant activity towards Avicel and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobiose, indicating that they express cellobiohydrolase.These results provide insight into the co-existence of symbionts in the guts of arthropods and their possible exploitation for the production of fuels and chemicals derived from plant biomass.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Synthetic Biology and Biofuels Group, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Arthropods living on plants are able to digest plant biomass with the help of microbial flora in their guts. This study considered three arthropods from different niches - termites, pill-bugs and yellow stem-borers - and screened their guts for cellulase producing microbes. Among 42 unique cellulase-producing strains, 50% belonged to Bacillaceae, 26% belonged to Enterobacteriaceae, 17% belonged to Microbacteriaceae, 5% belonged to Paenibacillaceae and 2% belonged to Promicromonosporaceae. The distribution of microbial families in the three arthropod guts reflected differences in their food consumption habits. Most of the carboxymethylcellulase positive strains also hydrolysed other amorphous substrates such as xylan, locust bean gum and β-D-glucan. Two strains, A11 and A21, demonstrated significant activity towards Avicel and p-nitrophenyl-β-D-cellobiose, indicating that they express cellobiohydrolase. These results provide insight into the co-existence of symbionts in the guts of arthropods and their possible exploitation for the production of fuels and chemicals derived from plant biomass.

Show MeSH