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Hemoglobin magnetism in aqueous solution probed by muon spin relaxation and future applications to brain research.

Nagamine K, Shimomura K, Miyadera H, Kim YJ, Scheicher RH, Das TP, Schultz JS - Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Phys. Biol. Sci. (2007)

Bottom Line: A marked difference in spin relaxation behavior due to hemoglobin magnetism was found for positive muons (μ(+)) in deoxyhemoglobin in comparison with that observed in oxyhemoglobin in aqueous solution at room temperature under zero and external longitudinal magnetic fields upto 0.4 Tesla.At the same time, small but significant unique relaxation pattern was observed in nonmagnetic oxyhemoglobin.Combined with our previous measurements on hemoglobin in human blood, application of this type of measurement to the studies of the level of oxygenation in various regions of the human brain is suggested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama, Japan . ; Muon Science Laboratory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK, Ibaraki, Japan . ; Physics Department, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, U.S.A .

ABSTRACT
A marked difference in spin relaxation behavior due to hemoglobin magnetism was found for positive muons (μ(+)) in deoxyhemoglobin in comparison with that observed in oxyhemoglobin in aqueous solution at room temperature under zero and external longitudinal magnetic fields upto 0.4 Tesla. At the same time, small but significant unique relaxation pattern was observed in nonmagnetic oxyhemoglobin. Combined with our previous measurements on hemoglobin in human blood, application of this type of measurement to the studies of the level of oxygenation in various regions of the human brain is suggested.

No MeSH data available.


Muon spin relaxation time spectrum for positive muon in deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin in aqueous solution at room temperature under upto 30 G longitudinal field. It is clearly seen that the earlier-time relaxation is maintained in deoxy-Hb and it is suppressed in oxy-Hb.
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f2a-83_120: Muon spin relaxation time spectrum for positive muon in deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin in aqueous solution at room temperature under upto 30 G longitudinal field. It is clearly seen that the earlier-time relaxation is maintained in deoxy-Hb and it is suppressed in oxy-Hb.

Mentions: This picture was supported by the spin relaxation data under both weak and strong longitudinal decoupling magnetic fields whose results are seen in Fig. 2a and 2b. There, data consistent with the longitudinal-field decoupling of the fluctuating field were obtained: an earlier-time-range relaxation in terms of both asymmetry and relaxation rate was significantly recovered by a small longitudinal field of 20 G in oxyhemoglobin, while the asymmetry is not affected and the relaxation rate only is weakly recovered in deoxy-Hb (Fig. 2a); a significant reduction of the asymmetry at 1 μs exists for the deoxy-Hb at 1 kG region (83%) which is restored to the value of the oxy-Hb (95%) only above the 3 kG decoupling field (Fig. 2b).


Hemoglobin magnetism in aqueous solution probed by muon spin relaxation and future applications to brain research.

Nagamine K, Shimomura K, Miyadera H, Kim YJ, Scheicher RH, Das TP, Schultz JS - Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Phys. Biol. Sci. (2007)

Muon spin relaxation time spectrum for positive muon in deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin in aqueous solution at room temperature under upto 30 G longitudinal field. It is clearly seen that the earlier-time relaxation is maintained in deoxy-Hb and it is suppressed in oxy-Hb.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756736&req=5

f2a-83_120: Muon spin relaxation time spectrum for positive muon in deoxyhemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin in aqueous solution at room temperature under upto 30 G longitudinal field. It is clearly seen that the earlier-time relaxation is maintained in deoxy-Hb and it is suppressed in oxy-Hb.
Mentions: This picture was supported by the spin relaxation data under both weak and strong longitudinal decoupling magnetic fields whose results are seen in Fig. 2a and 2b. There, data consistent with the longitudinal-field decoupling of the fluctuating field were obtained: an earlier-time-range relaxation in terms of both asymmetry and relaxation rate was significantly recovered by a small longitudinal field of 20 G in oxyhemoglobin, while the asymmetry is not affected and the relaxation rate only is weakly recovered in deoxy-Hb (Fig. 2a); a significant reduction of the asymmetry at 1 μs exists for the deoxy-Hb at 1 kG region (83%) which is restored to the value of the oxy-Hb (95%) only above the 3 kG decoupling field (Fig. 2b).

Bottom Line: A marked difference in spin relaxation behavior due to hemoglobin magnetism was found for positive muons (μ(+)) in deoxyhemoglobin in comparison with that observed in oxyhemoglobin in aqueous solution at room temperature under zero and external longitudinal magnetic fields upto 0.4 Tesla.At the same time, small but significant unique relaxation pattern was observed in nonmagnetic oxyhemoglobin.Combined with our previous measurements on hemoglobin in human blood, application of this type of measurement to the studies of the level of oxygenation in various regions of the human brain is suggested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama, Japan . ; Muon Science Laboratory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK, Ibaraki, Japan . ; Physics Department, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, U.S.A .

ABSTRACT
A marked difference in spin relaxation behavior due to hemoglobin magnetism was found for positive muons (μ(+)) in deoxyhemoglobin in comparison with that observed in oxyhemoglobin in aqueous solution at room temperature under zero and external longitudinal magnetic fields upto 0.4 Tesla. At the same time, small but significant unique relaxation pattern was observed in nonmagnetic oxyhemoglobin. Combined with our previous measurements on hemoglobin in human blood, application of this type of measurement to the studies of the level of oxygenation in various regions of the human brain is suggested.

No MeSH data available.