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A case report of human immunodeficiency virus-associated anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

Taniai H, Furusyo N, Murata M, Mitsumoto F, Shimizu M, Toyoda K, Ogawa E, Kainuma M, Okada K, Hayashi J - Springerplus (2013)

Bottom Line: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is not so common, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein (ALK)-negative ALCL is rare and has a low survival rate.We report a case of a 31-year-old Japanese man diagnosed with HIV-associated ALK-negative ALCL who presented with long-lasting fever of unknown origin.Eight-cycle chemotherapy that included cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone in addition to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection provided a complete remission of his ALCL and over 5-year survival for him.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Internal Medicine, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is not so common, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein (ALK)-negative ALCL is rare and has a low survival rate. We report a case of a 31-year-old Japanese man diagnosed with HIV-associated ALK-negative ALCL who presented with long-lasting fever of unknown origin. The diagnosis was based on a full work-up that included inguinal lymph-node biopsy. Eight-cycle chemotherapy that included cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone in addition to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection provided a complete remission of his ALCL and over 5-year survival for him.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gallium scintigraphy at hospital day 38 and fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography at hospital day 56. Images of gallium scintigraphy show high up-take (arrows) in the systemic bone marrow (1A) and right sacroiliac joint (1B). Images of fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (1C and 1D) show abnormal uptake in some ribs, the spine, sacroiliac joint, mediastinal lymph nodes, and bilateral hilum of lung.
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Fig1: Gallium scintigraphy at hospital day 38 and fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography at hospital day 56. Images of gallium scintigraphy show high up-take (arrows) in the systemic bone marrow (1A) and right sacroiliac joint (1B). Images of fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (1C and 1D) show abnormal uptake in some ribs, the spine, sacroiliac joint, mediastinal lymph nodes, and bilateral hilum of lung.

Mentions: A second thoracic CT showed another lesion in the left lung, and on that occasion his blood was positive by Quanti FERON-TB Gold In Tube assay, which is used for the screening of latent tuberculosis. To rule out pulmonary tuberculosis, bronchoscopy was done, but the bronchoalveolar lavage indicated no pulmonary diseases. Repeated cultures of sputum, gastric fluid, and bone marrow tissue were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and MAC. The second trunk MRI at hospital day 31 showed high signals in the spine and sacroiliac joint. At hospital day 38, the second gallium scintigraphy showed high up-take of systematic bone marrow and in the right sacroiliac joint (FigureĀ 1A and 1B).Figure 1


A case report of human immunodeficiency virus-associated anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma.

Taniai H, Furusyo N, Murata M, Mitsumoto F, Shimizu M, Toyoda K, Ogawa E, Kainuma M, Okada K, Hayashi J - Springerplus (2013)

Gallium scintigraphy at hospital day 38 and fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography at hospital day 56. Images of gallium scintigraphy show high up-take (arrows) in the systemic bone marrow (1A) and right sacroiliac joint (1B). Images of fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (1C and 1D) show abnormal uptake in some ribs, the spine, sacroiliac joint, mediastinal lymph nodes, and bilateral hilum of lung.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756731&req=5

Fig1: Gallium scintigraphy at hospital day 38 and fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography at hospital day 56. Images of gallium scintigraphy show high up-take (arrows) in the systemic bone marrow (1A) and right sacroiliac joint (1B). Images of fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (1C and 1D) show abnormal uptake in some ribs, the spine, sacroiliac joint, mediastinal lymph nodes, and bilateral hilum of lung.
Mentions: A second thoracic CT showed another lesion in the left lung, and on that occasion his blood was positive by Quanti FERON-TB Gold In Tube assay, which is used for the screening of latent tuberculosis. To rule out pulmonary tuberculosis, bronchoscopy was done, but the bronchoalveolar lavage indicated no pulmonary diseases. Repeated cultures of sputum, gastric fluid, and bone marrow tissue were negative for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and MAC. The second trunk MRI at hospital day 31 showed high signals in the spine and sacroiliac joint. At hospital day 38, the second gallium scintigraphy showed high up-take of systematic bone marrow and in the right sacroiliac joint (FigureĀ 1A and 1B).Figure 1

Bottom Line: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is not so common, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein (ALK)-negative ALCL is rare and has a low survival rate.We report a case of a 31-year-old Japanese man diagnosed with HIV-associated ALK-negative ALCL who presented with long-lasting fever of unknown origin.Eight-cycle chemotherapy that included cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone in addition to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection provided a complete remission of his ALCL and over 5-year survival for him.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Internal Medicine, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-Ku, Fukuoka, 812-8582 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is not so common, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein (ALK)-negative ALCL is rare and has a low survival rate. We report a case of a 31-year-old Japanese man diagnosed with HIV-associated ALK-negative ALCL who presented with long-lasting fever of unknown origin. The diagnosis was based on a full work-up that included inguinal lymph-node biopsy. Eight-cycle chemotherapy that included cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone in addition to antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection provided a complete remission of his ALCL and over 5-year survival for him.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus