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A Novel Type of Tri-Colour Light-Emitting-Diode-Based Spectrometric Detector for Low-Budget Flow-Injection Analysis

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ABSTRACT

In this paper we describe a low-cost spectrometric detector that can be easily assembled in a laboratory for less than €80 with a minimal number of optical components and which has proved sensitive and flexible enough for real-life applications. The starting point for the idea to construct this small, compact low-cost spectrometric detector was the decision to use a tri-colour light-emitting diode (LED) of the red-green-blue (RGB) type as a light source with the objective of achieving some flexibility in the selection of the wavelength (430 nm, 565 nm, 625 nm) but avoiding the use of optical fibres. Due to the dislocation of the emitters of the different coloured light, the tri-colour LED-based detector required an optical geometry that differs from those that are described in literature. The proposed novel geometry, with a coil-type glass flow-through cell with up to four ascending turns, proved useful and fit for the purpose. The simplicity of the device means it requires a minimal number of optical components, i.e., only a tri-colour LED and a photoresistor. In order to make a flow-injection analysis (FIA) with the spectrometric detector even more accessible for those with a limited budget, we additionally describe a low-cost simplified syringe-pump-based FIA set-up (€625), the assembling of which requires no more than basic technical facilities. We used such a set-up to test the performance of the proposed spectrometric detector for flow-injection analyses. The tests proved its suitability for real-life applications. The design procedures are also described.

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The low-cost simplified FIA set-up with volume-based injection, the assembling of which we suggest for low-budget circumstances and which we used for testing the proposed spectrometric detector for real-life applications in the green light range. We used this set-up together with a low-cost data-acquisition device with a data-point sampling rate limited to 1 measurement per second.
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f7-sensors-07-00166: The low-cost simplified FIA set-up with volume-based injection, the assembling of which we suggest for low-budget circumstances and which we used for testing the proposed spectrometric detector for real-life applications in the green light range. We used this set-up together with a low-cost data-acquisition device with a data-point sampling rate limited to 1 measurement per second.

Mentions: In order to prove this presumption and to further extend the experimental opportunities for the low-cost FIA, the set-up was rearranged as shown in Figure 7, so that it allows for volume-based injection. The injection valve assembling procedure is described in the Experimental section 3.2. A low-cost counterpart (€180) which was used successfully as an interface and as a data acquisition device for the spectrometric detector is the digital multimeter M-3860, (Metex Corporation, Korea) with a serial output and supporting software. The spectrometer's analogue output was connected to the multimeter's voltage input, and its serial output was connected to the computer. The supporting software allowed data acquisition at a maximum rate of 1 measurement per second.


A Novel Type of Tri-Colour Light-Emitting-Diode-Based Spectrometric Detector for Low-Budget Flow-Injection Analysis
The low-cost simplified FIA set-up with volume-based injection, the assembling of which we suggest for low-budget circumstances and which we used for testing the proposed spectrometric detector for real-life applications in the green light range. We used this set-up together with a low-cost data-acquisition device with a data-point sampling rate limited to 1 measurement per second.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756699&req=5

f7-sensors-07-00166: The low-cost simplified FIA set-up with volume-based injection, the assembling of which we suggest for low-budget circumstances and which we used for testing the proposed spectrometric detector for real-life applications in the green light range. We used this set-up together with a low-cost data-acquisition device with a data-point sampling rate limited to 1 measurement per second.
Mentions: In order to prove this presumption and to further extend the experimental opportunities for the low-cost FIA, the set-up was rearranged as shown in Figure 7, so that it allows for volume-based injection. The injection valve assembling procedure is described in the Experimental section 3.2. A low-cost counterpart (€180) which was used successfully as an interface and as a data acquisition device for the spectrometric detector is the digital multimeter M-3860, (Metex Corporation, Korea) with a serial output and supporting software. The spectrometer's analogue output was connected to the multimeter's voltage input, and its serial output was connected to the computer. The supporting software allowed data acquisition at a maximum rate of 1 measurement per second.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

In this paper we describe a low-cost spectrometric detector that can be easily assembled in a laboratory for less than €80 with a minimal number of optical components and which has proved sensitive and flexible enough for real-life applications. The starting point for the idea to construct this small, compact low-cost spectrometric detector was the decision to use a tri-colour light-emitting diode (LED) of the red-green-blue (RGB) type as a light source with the objective of achieving some flexibility in the selection of the wavelength (430 nm, 565 nm, 625 nm) but avoiding the use of optical fibres. Due to the dislocation of the emitters of the different coloured light, the tri-colour LED-based detector required an optical geometry that differs from those that are described in literature. The proposed novel geometry, with a coil-type glass flow-through cell with up to four ascending turns, proved useful and fit for the purpose. The simplicity of the device means it requires a minimal number of optical components, i.e., only a tri-colour LED and a photoresistor. In order to make a flow-injection analysis (FIA) with the spectrometric detector even more accessible for those with a limited budget, we additionally describe a low-cost simplified syringe-pump-based FIA set-up (€625), the assembling of which requires no more than basic technical facilities. We used such a set-up to test the performance of the proposed spectrometric detector for flow-injection analyses. The tests proved its suitability for real-life applications. The design procedures are also described.

No MeSH data available.