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Better sanitation, with communities taking the lead.

Sabur MA - Community Eye Health (2013)

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Freelance public health consultant and former country representative: WaterAid Bangladesh.

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Most traditional sanitation programmes provide some form of subsidy to individual families to reduce the cost of building a toilet... This approach is based on the assumption that both the construction and use of toilets depend on private decisions and on hygiene behaviour at the household level... However, this approach normally results in small, step-by-step changes in sanitation coverage, with further improvements becoming steadily more difficult once early adopters and households with higher incomes have installed sanitation facilities... Few large-scale sanitation programmes of this type have been successful... This approach recognises that sanitation is both a public and a private good, and that individual hygiene behaviour can affect the whole community: if your neighbours defecate in the open, then your children risk excreta-related disease even when the members of your own household use a sanitary toilet, wash their hands, and practice good hygiene... In this sense, total sanitation refers to a total stop on open defecation, which requires that everyone in the community either owns or has access to a sanitary toilet... This process is the reverse of most conventional sanitation programmes, which tend to favour those who can afford toilets, have land available to build toilets, and are first on the list for subsidised facilities... The important thing is that the people see themselves as a community whose members affect and support each other... As individual communities within a geographical/administrative area become motivated, neighbouring communities become aware of the improved situation and are motivated to find out about total sanitation... Initially, the input of the external facilitators may be high as they work to encourage members of the community to get involved... As the process develops, the need for external facilitation will decrease and eventually end... Non-governmental organisations in Bangladesh and other countries report that they have used the total sanitation approach in stopping open defecation, using participatory techniques to raise awareness of local sanitation issues and to assist communities to solve their own problems... The combination of internal community pressure and external NGO support is reported to have enabled thousands of communities to reach total sanitation coverage without any hardware subsidies at household level.

No MeSH data available.


Muhammod Abdus Sabur
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Figure 1: Muhammod Abdus Sabur


Better sanitation, with communities taking the lead.

Sabur MA - Community Eye Health (2013)

Muhammod Abdus Sabur
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756646&req=5

Figure 1: Muhammod Abdus Sabur

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Freelance public health consultant and former country representative: WaterAid Bangladesh.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Most traditional sanitation programmes provide some form of subsidy to individual families to reduce the cost of building a toilet... This approach is based on the assumption that both the construction and use of toilets depend on private decisions and on hygiene behaviour at the household level... However, this approach normally results in small, step-by-step changes in sanitation coverage, with further improvements becoming steadily more difficult once early adopters and households with higher incomes have installed sanitation facilities... Few large-scale sanitation programmes of this type have been successful... This approach recognises that sanitation is both a public and a private good, and that individual hygiene behaviour can affect the whole community: if your neighbours defecate in the open, then your children risk excreta-related disease even when the members of your own household use a sanitary toilet, wash their hands, and practice good hygiene... In this sense, total sanitation refers to a total stop on open defecation, which requires that everyone in the community either owns or has access to a sanitary toilet... This process is the reverse of most conventional sanitation programmes, which tend to favour those who can afford toilets, have land available to build toilets, and are first on the list for subsidised facilities... The important thing is that the people see themselves as a community whose members affect and support each other... As individual communities within a geographical/administrative area become motivated, neighbouring communities become aware of the improved situation and are motivated to find out about total sanitation... Initially, the input of the external facilitators may be high as they work to encourage members of the community to get involved... As the process develops, the need for external facilitation will decrease and eventually end... Non-governmental organisations in Bangladesh and other countries report that they have used the total sanitation approach in stopping open defecation, using participatory techniques to raise awareness of local sanitation issues and to assist communities to solve their own problems... The combination of internal community pressure and external NGO support is reported to have enabled thousands of communities to reach total sanitation coverage without any hardware subsidies at household level.

No MeSH data available.