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Neglected tropical diseases.

Molyneux D - Community Eye Health (2013)

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Affiliation: Emeritus Professor: Centre for Neglected Tropical Diseases, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK.

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The infectious agents responsible include: viruses (rabies and dengue) bacteria (leprosy, yaws, trachoma and Buruli ulcer) protozoa (leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis) helminth parasites (schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, intestinal worms and Guinea worm)... Transmission is equally diverse and can take place via: flies, fomites (e.g. skin cells, hair, clothing or bedding) and fingers (trachoma) mosquitoes (dengue fever and filariasis) tsetse flies (sleeping sickness) sandflies (leishmaniasis) blackflies (onchocerciasis) snails, which release infective larvae into water to penetrate human skin (e.g schistosomiasis) the faeco-oral route (e.g. soil-transmitted helminths-see page 29) or via food products... NTDs can cause blindness (onchocerciasis and trachoma), deformity and disablement, disfigurement, cancers, and neurological problems... Despite the diversity of the strategies, however, there are good opportunities for comprehensive NTD elimination and control programmes... NTDs are a result of poverty; they also contribute to further poverty in those people affected... These programmes, together with increased country commitment to the control of NTDs and novel approaches to drug distribution (e.g. through community-directed interventions or school health programmes) have made it possible to address some NTDs (trachoma, onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, soil-transmitted helminths, and schistosomiasis) on a massive scale, in what have become known as mass drug administration (MDA) programmes... To address this, NTD partners need to: engage in advocacy in their country complete mapping enhance human resource capacity in order to deliver integrated treatments within the health system address the backlog of surgery for some diseases (in particular, trachoma and lymphatic filariasis) implement a new strategy in areas where Loa loa (tropical eye worm) is co-endemic with lymphatic filariasis... Globally, the investment required for the delivery of donated drugs is estimated at around US $0.50 per person treated, per year... Included in this ‘unit cost’ is the cost of training, social mobilisation, evaluation and monitoring, and surveillance, all of which are needed for mass drug administration programmes to be effective... Programmes to eliminate and control NTDs address issues of equity (equal access to health care) and are interventions that directly benefit the poor... The drug treatments are effective and broadly safe when correct policies are followed (see page 26)... They have proved that it is possible to deliver free drugs to the poorest in need at unit costs that even some of the poorest countries can afford, and have already afforded... We must call for this successful intervention to be made available to everyone who needs treatment... The NTD community has been successful in achieving a paradigm shift in the global health community's thinking about these diseases, as exemplified in a WHA Resolution and their inclusion in the a post-2015 Health Goal (see panel, page 23)... What were hitherto unpronounceable conditions of poor people, and which did not concern high-income countries, are now high on the global health agenda.

No MeSH data available.


Treatment is brought to every home in the village. ZANZIBAR
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Figure 4: Treatment is brought to every home in the village. ZANZIBAR


Neglected tropical diseases.

Molyneux D - Community Eye Health (2013)

Treatment is brought to every home in the village. ZANZIBAR
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756642&req=5

Figure 4: Treatment is brought to every home in the village. ZANZIBAR

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Emeritus Professor: Centre for Neglected Tropical Diseases, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, UK.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The infectious agents responsible include: viruses (rabies and dengue) bacteria (leprosy, yaws, trachoma and Buruli ulcer) protozoa (leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis) helminth parasites (schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, onchocerciasis, intestinal worms and Guinea worm)... Transmission is equally diverse and can take place via: flies, fomites (e.g. skin cells, hair, clothing or bedding) and fingers (trachoma) mosquitoes (dengue fever and filariasis) tsetse flies (sleeping sickness) sandflies (leishmaniasis) blackflies (onchocerciasis) snails, which release infective larvae into water to penetrate human skin (e.g schistosomiasis) the faeco-oral route (e.g. soil-transmitted helminths-see page 29) or via food products... NTDs can cause blindness (onchocerciasis and trachoma), deformity and disablement, disfigurement, cancers, and neurological problems... Despite the diversity of the strategies, however, there are good opportunities for comprehensive NTD elimination and control programmes... NTDs are a result of poverty; they also contribute to further poverty in those people affected... These programmes, together with increased country commitment to the control of NTDs and novel approaches to drug distribution (e.g. through community-directed interventions or school health programmes) have made it possible to address some NTDs (trachoma, onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis, soil-transmitted helminths, and schistosomiasis) on a massive scale, in what have become known as mass drug administration (MDA) programmes... To address this, NTD partners need to: engage in advocacy in their country complete mapping enhance human resource capacity in order to deliver integrated treatments within the health system address the backlog of surgery for some diseases (in particular, trachoma and lymphatic filariasis) implement a new strategy in areas where Loa loa (tropical eye worm) is co-endemic with lymphatic filariasis... Globally, the investment required for the delivery of donated drugs is estimated at around US $0.50 per person treated, per year... Included in this ‘unit cost’ is the cost of training, social mobilisation, evaluation and monitoring, and surveillance, all of which are needed for mass drug administration programmes to be effective... Programmes to eliminate and control NTDs address issues of equity (equal access to health care) and are interventions that directly benefit the poor... The drug treatments are effective and broadly safe when correct policies are followed (see page 26)... They have proved that it is possible to deliver free drugs to the poorest in need at unit costs that even some of the poorest countries can afford, and have already afforded... We must call for this successful intervention to be made available to everyone who needs treatment... The NTD community has been successful in achieving a paradigm shift in the global health community's thinking about these diseases, as exemplified in a WHA Resolution and their inclusion in the a post-2015 Health Goal (see panel, page 23)... What were hitherto unpronounceable conditions of poor people, and which did not concern high-income countries, are now high on the global health agenda.

No MeSH data available.