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The Inter-Life project: researching the potential of art, design and virtual worlds as a vehicle for assisting young people with key life changes and transitions.

Lally V, Sclater M - Br J Guid Counc (2013)

Bottom Line: During this they develop important life transition skills.We argue that the power of virtual worlds - to support emotional and cognitive engagement - could be utilised in practice settings.We need intermediate runaway objects which are less spectacular and more inviting… bringing together the big and the small, the impossible and the possible, the future-oriented activity level vision and the here and now consequential action. (Engeström, 2009, p. 305 and p. 328).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Education, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

ABSTRACT
Careers work in the twenty-first century faces a key challenge in terms of digital technologies: to evaluate their potential for careers work in challenging settings. Given the rapidity of developments, technologies require evaluation in research innovations and naturalistic settings. Virtual worlds offer potential for careers and guidance work, and the therapeutic domain. To illustrate this, we present examples in which young people explore their feelings and ideas, plans and difficulties, while preparing for film-making. During this they develop important life transition skills. We argue that the power of virtual worlds - to support emotional and cognitive engagement - could be utilised in practice settings. We conclude that they are serious candidates as digital tools in the careers and guidance domain. We need intermediate runaway objects which are less spectacular and more inviting… bringing together the big and the small, the impossible and the possible, the future-oriented activity level vision and the here and now consequential action. (Engeström, 2009, p. 305 and p. 328).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tutor and student summary from Workshop 2 on an interactive board in the ‘Beach’ gathering arena.
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Figure 2: Tutor and student summary from Workshop 2 on an interactive board in the ‘Beach’ gathering arena.

Mentions: Creative activities: this tool is based upon the concept of using a range of creative activities to give young people a vehicle for the expression of their feelings, ideas and emotions. It is intended that, in this way, the expression can be uniquely theirs, and can be shared with others within and without the group. In harnessing a wide range of non-verbal modes of expression, this tool helps to make these expressions more inclusive. In the workshop featured in this article, young people were able to use the interactive board system in ILI-2 to create exhibitions of their own photography, make commentaries on these, and share ideas arising from them (see Figures 1 and 2). In the Trinidad group the home environment/personal setting was used as a context for developing photographic work for a collaborative exhibition (Sclater, 2007, 2011).


The Inter-Life project: researching the potential of art, design and virtual worlds as a vehicle for assisting young people with key life changes and transitions.

Lally V, Sclater M - Br J Guid Counc (2013)

Tutor and student summary from Workshop 2 on an interactive board in the ‘Beach’ gathering arena.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756627&req=5

Figure 2: Tutor and student summary from Workshop 2 on an interactive board in the ‘Beach’ gathering arena.
Mentions: Creative activities: this tool is based upon the concept of using a range of creative activities to give young people a vehicle for the expression of their feelings, ideas and emotions. It is intended that, in this way, the expression can be uniquely theirs, and can be shared with others within and without the group. In harnessing a wide range of non-verbal modes of expression, this tool helps to make these expressions more inclusive. In the workshop featured in this article, young people were able to use the interactive board system in ILI-2 to create exhibitions of their own photography, make commentaries on these, and share ideas arising from them (see Figures 1 and 2). In the Trinidad group the home environment/personal setting was used as a context for developing photographic work for a collaborative exhibition (Sclater, 2007, 2011).

Bottom Line: During this they develop important life transition skills.We argue that the power of virtual worlds - to support emotional and cognitive engagement - could be utilised in practice settings.We need intermediate runaway objects which are less spectacular and more inviting… bringing together the big and the small, the impossible and the possible, the future-oriented activity level vision and the here and now consequential action. (Engeström, 2009, p. 305 and p. 328).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Education, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

ABSTRACT
Careers work in the twenty-first century faces a key challenge in terms of digital technologies: to evaluate their potential for careers work in challenging settings. Given the rapidity of developments, technologies require evaluation in research innovations and naturalistic settings. Virtual worlds offer potential for careers and guidance work, and the therapeutic domain. To illustrate this, we present examples in which young people explore their feelings and ideas, plans and difficulties, while preparing for film-making. During this they develop important life transition skills. We argue that the power of virtual worlds - to support emotional and cognitive engagement - could be utilised in practice settings. We conclude that they are serious candidates as digital tools in the careers and guidance domain. We need intermediate runaway objects which are less spectacular and more inviting… bringing together the big and the small, the impossible and the possible, the future-oriented activity level vision and the here and now consequential action. (Engeström, 2009, p. 305 and p. 328).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus