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In vivo imaging of human retinal microvasculature using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography.

Pinhas A, Dubow M, Shah N, Chui TY, Scoles D, Sulai YN, Weitz R, Walsh JB, Carroll J, Dubra A, Rosen RB - Biomed Opt Express (2013)

Bottom Line: We determined that all retinal capillary beds can be imaged using clinically accepted fluorescein dosages and safe light levels according to the ANSI Z136.1-2000 maximum permissible exposure.As expected, the 20 mg/kg oral dose showed higher image intensity for a longer period of time than did the 7 mg/kg oral and the 500 mg IV doses.The increased resolution of AOSLO FA, compared to conventional FA, offers great opportunity for studying physiological and pathological vascular processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, 310 E 14th St, New York, NY 10003, USA ; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1428 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029, USA ; Contributed equally to this manuscript and should be considered joint first authors.

ABSTRACT
The adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) allows visualization of microscopic structures of the human retina in vivo. In this work, we demonstrate its application in combination with oral and intravenous (IV) fluorescein angiography (FA) to the in vivo visualization of the human retinal microvasculature. Ten healthy subjects ages 20 to 38 years were imaged using oral (7 and/or 20 mg/kg) and/or IV (500 mg) fluorescein. In agreement with current literature, there were no adverse effects among the patients receiving oral fluorescein while one patient receiving IV fluorescein experienced some nausea and heaving. We determined that all retinal capillary beds can be imaged using clinically accepted fluorescein dosages and safe light levels according to the ANSI Z136.1-2000 maximum permissible exposure. As expected, the 20 mg/kg oral dose showed higher image intensity for a longer period of time than did the 7 mg/kg oral and the 500 mg IV doses. The increased resolution of AOSLO FA, compared to conventional FA, offers great opportunity for studying physiological and pathological vascular processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Conventional SLO FA image (A) taken 20 minutes after oral administration of 20 mg/kg fluorescein, with two areas of interest (A insets B and C) approximately 5┬░ from the fovea. These same areas were magnified and contrast stretched (B1 and C1) for comparison with AOSLO FA images of the corresponding areas (B2 and C2), collected 30 minutes after oral fluorescein administration. The scale bar represents 100 ┬Ám and applies to all images other than image A.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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g001: Conventional SLO FA image (A) taken 20 minutes after oral administration of 20 mg/kg fluorescein, with two areas of interest (A insets B and C) approximately 5┬░ from the fovea. These same areas were magnified and contrast stretched (B1 and C1) for comparison with AOSLO FA images of the corresponding areas (B2 and C2), collected 30 minutes after oral fluorescein administration. The scale bar represents 100 ┬Ám and applies to all images other than image A.

Mentions: Images collected within 10 minutes of each other in a single subject using conventional scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) FA and AOSLO FA, following oral administration of 20 mg/kg fluorescein, illustrate the superior resolution provided by the use of adaptive optics (Fig. 1Fig. 1


In vivo imaging of human retinal microvasculature using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography.

Pinhas A, Dubow M, Shah N, Chui TY, Scoles D, Sulai YN, Weitz R, Walsh JB, Carroll J, Dubra A, Rosen RB - Biomed Opt Express (2013)

Conventional SLO FA image (A) taken 20 minutes after oral administration of 20 mg/kg fluorescein, with two areas of interest (A insets B and C) approximately 5┬░ from the fovea. These same areas were magnified and contrast stretched (B1 and C1) for comparison with AOSLO FA images of the corresponding areas (B2 and C2), collected 30 minutes after oral fluorescein administration. The scale bar represents 100 ┬Ám and applies to all images other than image A.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756583&req=5

g001: Conventional SLO FA image (A) taken 20 minutes after oral administration of 20 mg/kg fluorescein, with two areas of interest (A insets B and C) approximately 5┬░ from the fovea. These same areas were magnified and contrast stretched (B1 and C1) for comparison with AOSLO FA images of the corresponding areas (B2 and C2), collected 30 minutes after oral fluorescein administration. The scale bar represents 100 ┬Ám and applies to all images other than image A.
Mentions: Images collected within 10 minutes of each other in a single subject using conventional scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) FA and AOSLO FA, following oral administration of 20 mg/kg fluorescein, illustrate the superior resolution provided by the use of adaptive optics (Fig. 1Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We determined that all retinal capillary beds can be imaged using clinically accepted fluorescein dosages and safe light levels according to the ANSI Z136.1-2000 maximum permissible exposure.As expected, the 20 mg/kg oral dose showed higher image intensity for a longer period of time than did the 7 mg/kg oral and the 500 mg IV doses.The increased resolution of AOSLO FA, compared to conventional FA, offers great opportunity for studying physiological and pathological vascular processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, 310 E 14th St, New York, NY 10003, USA ; Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1428 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029, USA ; Contributed equally to this manuscript and should be considered joint first authors.

ABSTRACT
The adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) allows visualization of microscopic structures of the human retina in vivo. In this work, we demonstrate its application in combination with oral and intravenous (IV) fluorescein angiography (FA) to the in vivo visualization of the human retinal microvasculature. Ten healthy subjects ages 20 to 38 years were imaged using oral (7 and/or 20 mg/kg) and/or IV (500 mg) fluorescein. In agreement with current literature, there were no adverse effects among the patients receiving oral fluorescein while one patient receiving IV fluorescein experienced some nausea and heaving. We determined that all retinal capillary beds can be imaged using clinically accepted fluorescein dosages and safe light levels according to the ANSI Z136.1-2000 maximum permissible exposure. As expected, the 20 mg/kg oral dose showed higher image intensity for a longer period of time than did the 7 mg/kg oral and the 500 mg IV doses. The increased resolution of AOSLO FA, compared to conventional FA, offers great opportunity for studying physiological and pathological vascular processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus