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Translating knowledge from Pakistan's second generation surveillance system to other global contexts.

Adrien A, Thompson LH, Archibald CP, Sandstrom PA, Munro M, Emmanuel F, Blanchard JF - Sex Transm Infect (2012)

Bottom Line: Importantly, the donor country, Canada, has benefited in significant ways from this partnership.Operational and logistical lessons from HASP have, in turn, improved how surveillance is performed in Canada.Through this project, significant capacity was built among the staff of HASP, non-governmental organisations which were engaged as implementation partners, data coordination units which were established in each province, and in the laboratory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Direction de Santé Publique, Agence de la Santé et des Services Sociaux de Montreal, , Montréal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: From 2004 to 2011, a collaborative project was undertaken to enhance the capacity of the Government of Pakistan to implement an effective second-generation surveillance system for HIV/AIDS, known as the HIV/AIDS Surveillance Project (HASP). In four separate rounds, behavioural questionnaires were administered among injection drug users, and female, male and hijra (transgender) sex workers. Dried blood spots were collected for HIV testing.

Methods: Through interviews with project staff in Pakistan and Canada, we have undertaken a critical review of the role of HASP in generating, using and translating knowledge, with an emphasis on capacity building within both the donor and recipient countries. We also documented ongoing and future opportunities for the translation of knowledge produced through HASP.

Results: Knowledge translation activities have included educational workshops and consultations held in places as diverse as Colombia and Cairo, and the implementation of HASP methodologies in Asia, the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. HASP methodologies have been incorporated in multiple WHO reports. Importantly, the donor country, Canada, has benefited in significant ways from this partnership. Operational and logistical lessons from HASP have, in turn, improved how surveillance is performed in Canada. Through this project, significant capacity was built among the staff of HASP, non-governmental organisations which were engaged as implementation partners, data coordination units which were established in each province, and in the laboratory. As is to be expected, different organisations have different agendas and priorities, requiring negotiation, at times, to ensure the success of collaborative activities. Overall, there has been considerable interest in and opportunities made for learning about the methodologies and approaches employed by HASP.

Conclusions: Generally, the recognition of the strengths of the approaches and methodologies used by HASP has ensured an appetite for opportunities of mutual learning.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

HASP methodology.
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SEXTRANS2012050774F1: HASP methodology.

Mentions: The first step of HASP methodology (figure 1) is geographic mapping to obtain a better understanding of the size of key populations and patterns of risk behaviour. The approach involves characterising high-risk activities such as sex work and injection drug use, and estimating the number of individuals involved in these activities. In addition, mapping identifies and characterises locations where high-risk activities take place. Finally, mapping provides information about sub-types of high-risk activities (eg street-based sex work and brothel-based sex work). This information is critical for developing sampling strategies that can ensure selection biases are minimised and information collected is representative of the sub-population studied. After many discussions, it was decided that recruitment of key populations should take place through offices dedicated specifically to HASP rather than pre-existing sexually transmitted infection clinics and primary health centres. Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) were engaged as implementation partners in many aspects of surveillance planning and implementation, including mapping, the recruitment of key population members and data collection. Through the use of questionnaires and dried blood spot collection at regular intervals, information about HIV prevalence and key behavioural and structural vulnerability indicators were then obtained from IDUs, MSWs, FSWs and hijra sex workers. Mapping and integrated behavioural and biological surveillance were conducted in four separate rounds and in many cities across Pakistan, allowing for geographic comparisons and the analysis of temporal trends.


Translating knowledge from Pakistan's second generation surveillance system to other global contexts.

Adrien A, Thompson LH, Archibald CP, Sandstrom PA, Munro M, Emmanuel F, Blanchard JF - Sex Transm Infect (2012)

HASP methodology.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756434&req=5

SEXTRANS2012050774F1: HASP methodology.
Mentions: The first step of HASP methodology (figure 1) is geographic mapping to obtain a better understanding of the size of key populations and patterns of risk behaviour. The approach involves characterising high-risk activities such as sex work and injection drug use, and estimating the number of individuals involved in these activities. In addition, mapping identifies and characterises locations where high-risk activities take place. Finally, mapping provides information about sub-types of high-risk activities (eg street-based sex work and brothel-based sex work). This information is critical for developing sampling strategies that can ensure selection biases are minimised and information collected is representative of the sub-population studied. After many discussions, it was decided that recruitment of key populations should take place through offices dedicated specifically to HASP rather than pre-existing sexually transmitted infection clinics and primary health centres. Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) were engaged as implementation partners in many aspects of surveillance planning and implementation, including mapping, the recruitment of key population members and data collection. Through the use of questionnaires and dried blood spot collection at regular intervals, information about HIV prevalence and key behavioural and structural vulnerability indicators were then obtained from IDUs, MSWs, FSWs and hijra sex workers. Mapping and integrated behavioural and biological surveillance were conducted in four separate rounds and in many cities across Pakistan, allowing for geographic comparisons and the analysis of temporal trends.

Bottom Line: Importantly, the donor country, Canada, has benefited in significant ways from this partnership.Operational and logistical lessons from HASP have, in turn, improved how surveillance is performed in Canada.Through this project, significant capacity was built among the staff of HASP, non-governmental organisations which were engaged as implementation partners, data coordination units which were established in each province, and in the laboratory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Direction de Santé Publique, Agence de la Santé et des Services Sociaux de Montreal, , Montréal, Quebec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: From 2004 to 2011, a collaborative project was undertaken to enhance the capacity of the Government of Pakistan to implement an effective second-generation surveillance system for HIV/AIDS, known as the HIV/AIDS Surveillance Project (HASP). In four separate rounds, behavioural questionnaires were administered among injection drug users, and female, male and hijra (transgender) sex workers. Dried blood spots were collected for HIV testing.

Methods: Through interviews with project staff in Pakistan and Canada, we have undertaken a critical review of the role of HASP in generating, using and translating knowledge, with an emphasis on capacity building within both the donor and recipient countries. We also documented ongoing and future opportunities for the translation of knowledge produced through HASP.

Results: Knowledge translation activities have included educational workshops and consultations held in places as diverse as Colombia and Cairo, and the implementation of HASP methodologies in Asia, the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. HASP methodologies have been incorporated in multiple WHO reports. Importantly, the donor country, Canada, has benefited in significant ways from this partnership. Operational and logistical lessons from HASP have, in turn, improved how surveillance is performed in Canada. Through this project, significant capacity was built among the staff of HASP, non-governmental organisations which were engaged as implementation partners, data coordination units which were established in each province, and in the laboratory. As is to be expected, different organisations have different agendas and priorities, requiring negotiation, at times, to ensure the success of collaborative activities. Overall, there has been considerable interest in and opportunities made for learning about the methodologies and approaches employed by HASP.

Conclusions: Generally, the recognition of the strengths of the approaches and methodologies used by HASP has ensured an appetite for opportunities of mutual learning.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus