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Components of cell-matrix linkage as potential new markers for prostate cancer.

Navdaev A, Eble JA - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: Often being non-aggressive, prostate tumors in these cases do not need immediate treatment.Existing diagnostic methods may fail to accurately recognize the transition of a dormant, non-aggressive tumor into highly malignant prostate cancer.This review evaluates existing methods to diagnose prostate carcinoma, such as the biochemical marker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), but also discusses the possibility to use the altered expression of integrins and laminin-332 in prostate carcinomas as diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets of prostate cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Molecular Medicine, Deptartment Vascular Matrix Biology, Excellence Cluster Cardio-Pulmonary System, Frankfurt University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. eble@med.uni-frankfurt.de.

ABSTRACT
Prostate cancer is one of the most common tumor diseases worldwide. Often being non-aggressive, prostate tumors in these cases do not need immediate treatment. However, about 20% of diagnosed prostate cancers tend to metastasize and require treatment. Existing diagnostic methods may fail to accurately recognize the transition of a dormant, non-aggressive tumor into highly malignant prostate cancer. Therefore, new diagnostic tools are needed to improve diagnosis and therapy of prostate carcinoma. This review evaluates existing methods to diagnose prostate carcinoma, such as the biochemical marker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), but also discusses the possibility to use the altered expression of integrins and laminin-332 in prostate carcinomas as diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets of prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Metastatic cascade of prostate carcinoma (PC). PC cells grow into a primary tumor mostly within the peripheral zone of the prostate. At an aggressive stage, carcinoma cells start to disseminate from the primary tumor and penetrate through a basal membrane and stroma. After invading blood vessels or lymphatics, carcinoma cells can reach different organs where they can extravasate, settle, and form metastases, most often in bones and lymph nodes. Characteristically, PC cells also tend to migrate along nerve bundles which abundantly innervate the prostate.
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f1-cancers-03-00883: Metastatic cascade of prostate carcinoma (PC). PC cells grow into a primary tumor mostly within the peripheral zone of the prostate. At an aggressive stage, carcinoma cells start to disseminate from the primary tumor and penetrate through a basal membrane and stroma. After invading blood vessels or lymphatics, carcinoma cells can reach different organs where they can extravasate, settle, and form metastases, most often in bones and lymph nodes. Characteristically, PC cells also tend to migrate along nerve bundles which abundantly innervate the prostate.

Mentions: Aggressive carcinoma cells migrate from the primary tumor, invade and infiltrate into neighboring tissues. After penetrating blood or lymphatic vessels they can colonize other organs which are located far from the primary tumor. Almost any step of this metastatic cascade requires contact to basal membranes, which are penetrated by the tumor cells (Figure 1).


Components of cell-matrix linkage as potential new markers for prostate cancer.

Navdaev A, Eble JA - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

Metastatic cascade of prostate carcinoma (PC). PC cells grow into a primary tumor mostly within the peripheral zone of the prostate. At an aggressive stage, carcinoma cells start to disseminate from the primary tumor and penetrate through a basal membrane and stroma. After invading blood vessels or lymphatics, carcinoma cells can reach different organs where they can extravasate, settle, and form metastases, most often in bones and lymph nodes. Characteristically, PC cells also tend to migrate along nerve bundles which abundantly innervate the prostate.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756394&req=5

f1-cancers-03-00883: Metastatic cascade of prostate carcinoma (PC). PC cells grow into a primary tumor mostly within the peripheral zone of the prostate. At an aggressive stage, carcinoma cells start to disseminate from the primary tumor and penetrate through a basal membrane and stroma. After invading blood vessels or lymphatics, carcinoma cells can reach different organs where they can extravasate, settle, and form metastases, most often in bones and lymph nodes. Characteristically, PC cells also tend to migrate along nerve bundles which abundantly innervate the prostate.
Mentions: Aggressive carcinoma cells migrate from the primary tumor, invade and infiltrate into neighboring tissues. After penetrating blood or lymphatic vessels they can colonize other organs which are located far from the primary tumor. Almost any step of this metastatic cascade requires contact to basal membranes, which are penetrated by the tumor cells (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Often being non-aggressive, prostate tumors in these cases do not need immediate treatment.Existing diagnostic methods may fail to accurately recognize the transition of a dormant, non-aggressive tumor into highly malignant prostate cancer.This review evaluates existing methods to diagnose prostate carcinoma, such as the biochemical marker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), but also discusses the possibility to use the altered expression of integrins and laminin-332 in prostate carcinomas as diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets of prostate cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Molecular Medicine, Deptartment Vascular Matrix Biology, Excellence Cluster Cardio-Pulmonary System, Frankfurt University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany. eble@med.uni-frankfurt.de.

ABSTRACT
Prostate cancer is one of the most common tumor diseases worldwide. Often being non-aggressive, prostate tumors in these cases do not need immediate treatment. However, about 20% of diagnosed prostate cancers tend to metastasize and require treatment. Existing diagnostic methods may fail to accurately recognize the transition of a dormant, non-aggressive tumor into highly malignant prostate cancer. Therefore, new diagnostic tools are needed to improve diagnosis and therapy of prostate carcinoma. This review evaluates existing methods to diagnose prostate carcinoma, such as the biochemical marker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), but also discusses the possibility to use the altered expression of integrins and laminin-332 in prostate carcinomas as diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets of prostate cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus