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Growth factor mediated signaling in pancreatic pathogenesis.

Nandy D, Mukhopadhyay D - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis.Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors.However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu.

ABSTRACT
Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The pancreas is developed from fusion of ventral and dorsal bud.
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f1-cancers-03-00841: The pancreas is developed from fusion of ventral and dorsal bud.

Mentions: The pancreas develops from the fusion of the ventral and dorsal pancreatic bud after rotation (Figure 1) [1]. Congenital pancreatic anomalies such as agenesis (totally absent pancreas), pancreas division (failure of the fusion of the ventral and dorsal pancreatic buds) and annular pancreas (duodenum encircled by the pancreatic head) are rare. Embryonic model systems have established the importance of fibroblast growth factors for growth of the primitive pancreatic rudiment [2] and subsequent pancreatic development [3]. Specific growth factors (transforming growth factors, insulin and insulin-like growth factors) have been shown to be involved in the process of proliferation and differentiation of insulin- and glucagon-secreting pancreatic cells [4]. On the other hand, in zebrafish embryos-, the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to the ventral pancreatic bud expressed fibroblast growth factor-10 (FGF10), which plays a crucial role in ventral pancreatic induction and growth. Moreover, fibroblast growth factor-24 (FGF24) expression is vital for the pancreatic LPM patterning required for subsequent induction of the ventral pancreatic bud [5]. Overall, these studies suggest that growth factors play a pivotal role in pancreatic development.


Growth factor mediated signaling in pancreatic pathogenesis.

Nandy D, Mukhopadhyay D - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

The pancreas is developed from fusion of ventral and dorsal bud.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756392&req=5

f1-cancers-03-00841: The pancreas is developed from fusion of ventral and dorsal bud.
Mentions: The pancreas develops from the fusion of the ventral and dorsal pancreatic bud after rotation (Figure 1) [1]. Congenital pancreatic anomalies such as agenesis (totally absent pancreas), pancreas division (failure of the fusion of the ventral and dorsal pancreatic buds) and annular pancreas (duodenum encircled by the pancreatic head) are rare. Embryonic model systems have established the importance of fibroblast growth factors for growth of the primitive pancreatic rudiment [2] and subsequent pancreatic development [3]. Specific growth factors (transforming growth factors, insulin and insulin-like growth factors) have been shown to be involved in the process of proliferation and differentiation of insulin- and glucagon-secreting pancreatic cells [4]. On the other hand, in zebrafish embryos-, the lateral plate mesoderm (LPM) adjacent to the ventral pancreatic bud expressed fibroblast growth factor-10 (FGF10), which plays a crucial role in ventral pancreatic induction and growth. Moreover, fibroblast growth factor-24 (FGF24) expression is vital for the pancreatic LPM patterning required for subsequent induction of the ventral pancreatic bud [5]. Overall, these studies suggest that growth factors play a pivotal role in pancreatic development.

Bottom Line: Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis.Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors.However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu.

ABSTRACT
Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus