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Mastic oil inhibits the metastatic phenotype of mouse lung adenocarcinoma cells.

Loutrari H, Magkouta S, Papapetropoulos A, Roussos C - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: However, no studies have addressed its anti-metastatic actions.Moreover, exposure of LLC and endothelial cells to mastic oil impaired their adhesive interactions in a co-culture assay and reduced the expression of key adhesion molecules by endothelial cells upon their stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha.Overall, this study provides novel evidence supporting a multipotent role for mastic oil in prevention of crucial processes related to cancer metastasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: "G.P. Livanos and M. Simou Laboratories", Evangelismos Hospital, Department of Critical Care and Pulmonary Services, School of Medicine, University of Athens, 3 Ploutarchou Street, 10675 Athens, Greece. elloutrar@med.uoa.gr.

ABSTRACT
Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus variation chia, a natural combination of bioactive terpenes, has been shown to exert anti-tumor growth effects against a broad spectrum of cancers including mouse Lewis lung adenocarcinomas (LLC). However, no studies have addressed its anti-metastatic actions. In this study, we showed that treatment of LLC cells with mastic oil within a range of non-toxic concentrations (0.01-0.04% v/v): (a) abrogated their Matrigel invasion and migration capabilities in transwell assays; (b) reduced the levels of secreted MMP-2; (c) restricted phorbol ester-induced actin remodeling and (d) limited the length of neo-vessel networks in tumor microenvironment in the model of chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. Moreover, exposure of LLC and endothelial cells to mastic oil impaired their adhesive interactions in a co-culture assay and reduced the expression of key adhesion molecules by endothelial cells upon their stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Overall, this study provides novel evidence supporting a multipotent role for mastic oil in prevention of crucial processes related to cancer metastasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mastic oil attenuates tumor-related angiogenesis. Tumor cells pre-treated with vehicle (CTL), Moil (0.01-0.02 % v/v) or POH (0.5 mM) for 2 h were applied onto the CAM and further incubated for 48 h at 37 °C in the presence of test agents. (A) Representative photographs of vessel networks in the CAM; (B) Graphs from image analysis of vessel network length (mean % of control ± SEM, n = 30, *P<0.05 from vehicle.
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f3-cancers-03-00789: Mastic oil attenuates tumor-related angiogenesis. Tumor cells pre-treated with vehicle (CTL), Moil (0.01-0.02 % v/v) or POH (0.5 mM) for 2 h were applied onto the CAM and further incubated for 48 h at 37 °C in the presence of test agents. (A) Representative photographs of vessel networks in the CAM; (B) Graphs from image analysis of vessel network length (mean % of control ± SEM, n = 30, *P<0.05 from vehicle.

Mentions: We subsequently wished to address the consequences of mastic oil treatment on critical connections between tumor cells and the neighboring vasculature leading to tumor-related angiogenesis, endothelial adhesion and vascular penetration [25,35]. Previous experimental evidence from our laboratory indicated an inhibitory role of mastic oil on vascularization of LLC tumors and on the expression of two important chemotactic/pro-angiogenic mediators, namely vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [23]. Herein, by using an alternative tumor growth model in chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which recapitulates several of the in vivo tumor-host interactions [16,36], we were able to directly estimate the length of the vascular network in tumor microenvironment. As revealed by image analysis of pictures taken two days after the initial inoculation of tumor cells on the CAM, mastic oil treatment at 0.01% to 0.04% v/v reduced the length of the microvessel networks surrounding LLC implants in a concentration-dependent manner, compared to the vehicle control, whereas POH (0.5 and 1.0 mM) had a similar but weaker effect. Figure 3 shows the effects of test agents at the lower concentration range. Although MMP-2 has been shown to promote tumor-associated vascular remodeling [30,31], the anti-angiogenic effects presented in Figure 3 may not be related to the decrease of secreted MMP-2 by mastic oil as it was mediated only at the highest test concentration (0.04% v/v, Figure 1B).


Mastic oil inhibits the metastatic phenotype of mouse lung adenocarcinoma cells.

Loutrari H, Magkouta S, Papapetropoulos A, Roussos C - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

Mastic oil attenuates tumor-related angiogenesis. Tumor cells pre-treated with vehicle (CTL), Moil (0.01-0.02 % v/v) or POH (0.5 mM) for 2 h were applied onto the CAM and further incubated for 48 h at 37 °C in the presence of test agents. (A) Representative photographs of vessel networks in the CAM; (B) Graphs from image analysis of vessel network length (mean % of control ± SEM, n = 30, *P<0.05 from vehicle.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756390&req=5

f3-cancers-03-00789: Mastic oil attenuates tumor-related angiogenesis. Tumor cells pre-treated with vehicle (CTL), Moil (0.01-0.02 % v/v) or POH (0.5 mM) for 2 h were applied onto the CAM and further incubated for 48 h at 37 °C in the presence of test agents. (A) Representative photographs of vessel networks in the CAM; (B) Graphs from image analysis of vessel network length (mean % of control ± SEM, n = 30, *P<0.05 from vehicle.
Mentions: We subsequently wished to address the consequences of mastic oil treatment on critical connections between tumor cells and the neighboring vasculature leading to tumor-related angiogenesis, endothelial adhesion and vascular penetration [25,35]. Previous experimental evidence from our laboratory indicated an inhibitory role of mastic oil on vascularization of LLC tumors and on the expression of two important chemotactic/pro-angiogenic mediators, namely vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [23]. Herein, by using an alternative tumor growth model in chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which recapitulates several of the in vivo tumor-host interactions [16,36], we were able to directly estimate the length of the vascular network in tumor microenvironment. As revealed by image analysis of pictures taken two days after the initial inoculation of tumor cells on the CAM, mastic oil treatment at 0.01% to 0.04% v/v reduced the length of the microvessel networks surrounding LLC implants in a concentration-dependent manner, compared to the vehicle control, whereas POH (0.5 and 1.0 mM) had a similar but weaker effect. Figure 3 shows the effects of test agents at the lower concentration range. Although MMP-2 has been shown to promote tumor-associated vascular remodeling [30,31], the anti-angiogenic effects presented in Figure 3 may not be related to the decrease of secreted MMP-2 by mastic oil as it was mediated only at the highest test concentration (0.04% v/v, Figure 1B).

Bottom Line: However, no studies have addressed its anti-metastatic actions.Moreover, exposure of LLC and endothelial cells to mastic oil impaired their adhesive interactions in a co-culture assay and reduced the expression of key adhesion molecules by endothelial cells upon their stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha.Overall, this study provides novel evidence supporting a multipotent role for mastic oil in prevention of crucial processes related to cancer metastasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: "G.P. Livanos and M. Simou Laboratories", Evangelismos Hospital, Department of Critical Care and Pulmonary Services, School of Medicine, University of Athens, 3 Ploutarchou Street, 10675 Athens, Greece. elloutrar@med.uoa.gr.

ABSTRACT
Mastic oil from Pistacia lentiscus variation chia, a natural combination of bioactive terpenes, has been shown to exert anti-tumor growth effects against a broad spectrum of cancers including mouse Lewis lung adenocarcinomas (LLC). However, no studies have addressed its anti-metastatic actions. In this study, we showed that treatment of LLC cells with mastic oil within a range of non-toxic concentrations (0.01-0.04% v/v): (a) abrogated their Matrigel invasion and migration capabilities in transwell assays; (b) reduced the levels of secreted MMP-2; (c) restricted phorbol ester-induced actin remodeling and (d) limited the length of neo-vessel networks in tumor microenvironment in the model of chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. Moreover, exposure of LLC and endothelial cells to mastic oil impaired their adhesive interactions in a co-culture assay and reduced the expression of key adhesion molecules by endothelial cells upon their stimulation with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Overall, this study provides novel evidence supporting a multipotent role for mastic oil in prevention of crucial processes related to cancer metastasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus