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Extra-neural metastases of malignant gliomas: myth or reality?

Beauchesne P - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

Bottom Line: Virtually no patients are cured of their illness.They generally appear after craniotomy although spontaneous metastases have also been reported.Extra-neural metastases from gliomas frequently occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years), and generally appear after craniotomy, but spontaneous metastases have also been reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuro-Oncology, CHU de NANCY, Hôpital Central, CO n°34, 54035 Nancy Cedex, France. beauchesnep@wanadoo.fr.

ABSTRACT
Malignant gliomas account for approximately 60% of all primary brain tumors in adults. Prognosis for these patients has not significantly changed in recent years-despite debulking surgery, radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy-with a median survival of 9-12 months. Virtually no patients are cured of their illness. Malignant gliomas are usually locally invasive tumors, though extra-neural metastases can sometimes occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years). They generally appear after craniotomy although spontaneous metastases have also been reported. The incidence of these metastases from primary intra-cranial malignant gliomas is low; it is estimated at less than 2% of all cases. Extra-neural metastases from gliomas frequently occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years), and generally appear after craniotomy, but spontaneous metastases have also been reported. Malignant glioma metastases usually involve the regional lymph nodes, lungs and pleural cavity, and occasionally the bone and liver. In this review, we present three cases of extra-neural metastasis of malignant gliomas from our department, summarize the main reported cases in literature, and try to understand the mechanisms underlying these systemic metastases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT-scan axial imaging showing the brain after neurosurgery; a cavity was seen with blood.
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f1-cancers-03-00461: CT-scan axial imaging showing the brain after neurosurgery; a cavity was seen with blood.

Mentions: A 74 year-old male with a medical history of pulmonary tuberculosis progressively developed agitation and mental confusion over one month. Neurological examination revealed an intracranial pressure syndrome and a left-sided paresis. A cranial MRI displayed a large heterogeneous enhancing mass in the right temporo-occipital lobe. Surprisingly, the biological parameters revealed hyponatremia and a pancytopenia involving the red blood cells and platelets. A craniotomy was performed with an incomplete tumor resection and a GBM was diagnosed (Figure 1). The post-operative course was excellent with improved patient status; the confusion and intracranial pressure syndrome disappeared and the left-sided paresis was mild.


Extra-neural metastases of malignant gliomas: myth or reality?

Beauchesne P - Cancers (Basel) (2011)

CT-scan axial imaging showing the brain after neurosurgery; a cavity was seen with blood.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756372&req=5

f1-cancers-03-00461: CT-scan axial imaging showing the brain after neurosurgery; a cavity was seen with blood.
Mentions: A 74 year-old male with a medical history of pulmonary tuberculosis progressively developed agitation and mental confusion over one month. Neurological examination revealed an intracranial pressure syndrome and a left-sided paresis. A cranial MRI displayed a large heterogeneous enhancing mass in the right temporo-occipital lobe. Surprisingly, the biological parameters revealed hyponatremia and a pancytopenia involving the red blood cells and platelets. A craniotomy was performed with an incomplete tumor resection and a GBM was diagnosed (Figure 1). The post-operative course was excellent with improved patient status; the confusion and intracranial pressure syndrome disappeared and the left-sided paresis was mild.

Bottom Line: Virtually no patients are cured of their illness.They generally appear after craniotomy although spontaneous metastases have also been reported.Extra-neural metastases from gliomas frequently occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years), and generally appear after craniotomy, but spontaneous metastases have also been reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neuro-Oncology, CHU de NANCY, Hôpital Central, CO n°34, 54035 Nancy Cedex, France. beauchesnep@wanadoo.fr.

ABSTRACT
Malignant gliomas account for approximately 60% of all primary brain tumors in adults. Prognosis for these patients has not significantly changed in recent years-despite debulking surgery, radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy-with a median survival of 9-12 months. Virtually no patients are cured of their illness. Malignant gliomas are usually locally invasive tumors, though extra-neural metastases can sometimes occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years). They generally appear after craniotomy although spontaneous metastases have also been reported. The incidence of these metastases from primary intra-cranial malignant gliomas is low; it is estimated at less than 2% of all cases. Extra-neural metastases from gliomas frequently occur late in the course of the disease (median of two years), and generally appear after craniotomy, but spontaneous metastases have also been reported. Malignant glioma metastases usually involve the regional lymph nodes, lungs and pleural cavity, and occasionally the bone and liver. In this review, we present three cases of extra-neural metastasis of malignant gliomas from our department, summarize the main reported cases in literature, and try to understand the mechanisms underlying these systemic metastases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus