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Deceptively simple … The "deception-general" ability and the need to put the liar under the spotlight.

Wright GR, Berry CJ, Bird G - Front Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: Here, following the Focused Review format, we outline the method and results of the original paper and comment more on the value of lab-based experimental studies of deception, which have attracted criticism in recent years.While acknowledging that experimental paradigms may fail to recreate the full complexity and potential seriousness of real-world deceptive behavior, we suggest that lab-based deception paradigms can offer valuable insight into ecologically-valid deceptive behavior.It is our thesis that by addressing deception more holistically-by bringing the liar into the "spotlight" which is typically trained exclusively on the lie detector-we may further enhance our understanding of deception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Social Interaction Lab, Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London London, UK.

ABSTRACT
This Focused Review expands upon our original paper (You can't kid a kidder": Interaction between production and detection of deception in an interactive deception task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6:87). In that paper we introduced a new socially interactive, laboratory-based task, the Deceptive Interaction Task (DeceIT), and used it to measure individuals' ability to lie, their ability to detect the lies of others, and potential individual difference measures contributing to these abilities. We showed that the two skills were correlated; better liars made better lie detectors (a "deception general" ability) and this ability seemed to be independent of cognitive (IQ) and emotional (EQ) intelligence. Here, following the Focused Review format, we outline the method and results of the original paper and comment more on the value of lab-based experimental studies of deception, which have attracted criticism in recent years. While acknowledging that experimental paradigms may fail to recreate the full complexity and potential seriousness of real-world deceptive behavior, we suggest that lab-based deception paradigms can offer valuable insight into ecologically-valid deceptive behavior. The use of the DeceIT procedure enabled deception to be studied in an interactive setting, with motivated participants, and importantly allowed the study of both the liar and the lie detector within the same deceptive interaction. It is our thesis that by addressing deception more holistically-by bringing the liar into the "spotlight" which is typically trained exclusively on the lie detector-we may further enhance our understanding of deception.

No MeSH data available.


Correlation between Sender and Receiver performance using SDT measures for Receiver Accuracy (d′receiver) and Sender Detectability (d′sender) (r = −0.348, p = 0.006, d = 0.742).
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Figure 2: Correlation between Sender and Receiver performance using SDT measures for Receiver Accuracy (d′receiver) and Sender Detectability (d′sender) (r = −0.348, p = 0.006, d = 0.742).

Mentions: Large individual differences were observed in all of the four performance measures analyzed using Signal Detection Theory (M d′receiver = 0.242, SD = 0.418; M Creceiver = −0.086, SD = 0.233; M d′sender = 0.272, SD = 0.509; M Csender = 0.097, SD = 0.256). Of principal interest is the fact that detectability in the Sender role (d′sender) and the ability to discriminate in the Receiver role (d′receiver) were significantly correlated (r = −0.348, p = 0.006, d = 0.742, see Figure 2). As the ability to discriminate truthful from deceptive messages increased, the ability to produce deceptive messages that were hard to discriminate from truthful messages increased. Interestingly, a trend was observed for decreasing detectability in the Sender role to be associated with a reduced response latency difference between truthful and deceptive statements (Spearman's rho = 0.259, p = 0.068, post-hoc). The only significant association with either measure of bias (Truth-Bias or Credibility) was a correlation between a Sender's confidence that they were believed and their Credibility measure, i.e., those that judged they were believed were more likely to be seen as honest independently of the veracity of their statements (Spearman's rho = −0.316, p = 0.024, post-hoc). Neither IQ (all r values < 0.184), emotional ability relating to the self (all r values < 0.198), nor empathy (all r values < 0.153) correlated with d′receiver, Creceiver, d′sender, or Csender.


Deceptively simple … The "deception-general" ability and the need to put the liar under the spotlight.

Wright GR, Berry CJ, Bird G - Front Neurosci (2013)

Correlation between Sender and Receiver performance using SDT measures for Receiver Accuracy (d′receiver) and Sender Detectability (d′sender) (r = −0.348, p = 0.006, d = 0.742).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756307&req=5

Figure 2: Correlation between Sender and Receiver performance using SDT measures for Receiver Accuracy (d′receiver) and Sender Detectability (d′sender) (r = −0.348, p = 0.006, d = 0.742).
Mentions: Large individual differences were observed in all of the four performance measures analyzed using Signal Detection Theory (M d′receiver = 0.242, SD = 0.418; M Creceiver = −0.086, SD = 0.233; M d′sender = 0.272, SD = 0.509; M Csender = 0.097, SD = 0.256). Of principal interest is the fact that detectability in the Sender role (d′sender) and the ability to discriminate in the Receiver role (d′receiver) were significantly correlated (r = −0.348, p = 0.006, d = 0.742, see Figure 2). As the ability to discriminate truthful from deceptive messages increased, the ability to produce deceptive messages that were hard to discriminate from truthful messages increased. Interestingly, a trend was observed for decreasing detectability in the Sender role to be associated with a reduced response latency difference between truthful and deceptive statements (Spearman's rho = 0.259, p = 0.068, post-hoc). The only significant association with either measure of bias (Truth-Bias or Credibility) was a correlation between a Sender's confidence that they were believed and their Credibility measure, i.e., those that judged they were believed were more likely to be seen as honest independently of the veracity of their statements (Spearman's rho = −0.316, p = 0.024, post-hoc). Neither IQ (all r values < 0.184), emotional ability relating to the self (all r values < 0.198), nor empathy (all r values < 0.153) correlated with d′receiver, Creceiver, d′sender, or Csender.

Bottom Line: Here, following the Focused Review format, we outline the method and results of the original paper and comment more on the value of lab-based experimental studies of deception, which have attracted criticism in recent years.While acknowledging that experimental paradigms may fail to recreate the full complexity and potential seriousness of real-world deceptive behavior, we suggest that lab-based deception paradigms can offer valuable insight into ecologically-valid deceptive behavior.It is our thesis that by addressing deception more holistically-by bringing the liar into the "spotlight" which is typically trained exclusively on the lie detector-we may further enhance our understanding of deception.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Social Interaction Lab, Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London London, UK.

ABSTRACT
This Focused Review expands upon our original paper (You can't kid a kidder": Interaction between production and detection of deception in an interactive deception task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6:87). In that paper we introduced a new socially interactive, laboratory-based task, the Deceptive Interaction Task (DeceIT), and used it to measure individuals' ability to lie, their ability to detect the lies of others, and potential individual difference measures contributing to these abilities. We showed that the two skills were correlated; better liars made better lie detectors (a "deception general" ability) and this ability seemed to be independent of cognitive (IQ) and emotional (EQ) intelligence. Here, following the Focused Review format, we outline the method and results of the original paper and comment more on the value of lab-based experimental studies of deception, which have attracted criticism in recent years. While acknowledging that experimental paradigms may fail to recreate the full complexity and potential seriousness of real-world deceptive behavior, we suggest that lab-based deception paradigms can offer valuable insight into ecologically-valid deceptive behavior. The use of the DeceIT procedure enabled deception to be studied in an interactive setting, with motivated participants, and importantly allowed the study of both the liar and the lie detector within the same deceptive interaction. It is our thesis that by addressing deception more holistically-by bringing the liar into the "spotlight" which is typically trained exclusively on the lie detector-we may further enhance our understanding of deception.

No MeSH data available.