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Onychomycosis in children: an experience of 59 cases.

Kim DM, Suh MK, Ha GY - Ann Dermatol (2013)

Bottom Line: Fourteen (23.7%) children had concomitant tinea pedis infection, and tinea pedis or onychomycosis was also found in eight of the parents (13.6%).Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis was the most common (62.7%) clinical type.In fingernails, C. albicans was the most common isolated pathogen (50.0%), followed by T. rubrum (10.0%), C. parapsilosis (10.0%), and C. glabrata (5.0%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Gyeongju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although tinea unguium in children has been studied in the past, no specific etiological agents of onychomycosis in children has been reported in Korea.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate onychomycosis in Korean children.

Methods: We reviewed fifty nine patients with onychomycosis in children (0~18 years of age) who presented during the ten-year period between 1999 and 2009. Etiological agents were identified by cultures on Sabouraud's dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. An isolated colony of yeasts was considered as pathogens if the same fungal element was identified at initial direct microscopy and in specimen-yielding cultures at a follow-up visit.

Results: Onychomycosis in children represented 2.3% of all onychomycosis. Of the 59 pediatric patients with onychomycosis, 66.1% had toenail onychomycosis with the rest (33.9%) having fingernail onychomycosis. The male-to-female ratio was 1.95:1. Fourteen (23.7%) children had concomitant tinea pedis infection, and tinea pedis or onychomycosis was also found in eight of the parents (13.6%). Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis was the most common (62.7%) clinical type. In toenails, Trichophyton rubrum was the most common etiological agent (51.3%), followed by Candida albicans (10.2%), C. parapsilosis (5.1%), C. tropicalis (2.6%), and C. guilliermondii (2.6%). In fingernails, C. albicans was the most common isolated pathogen (50.0%), followed by T. rubrum (10.0%), C. parapsilosis (10.0%), and C. glabrata (5.0%).

Conclusion: Because of the increase in pediatric onychomycosis, we suggest the need for a careful mycological examination of children who are diagnosed with onychomycosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Residence of patients with onychomycosis in children.
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Figure 6: Residence of patients with onychomycosis in children.

Mentions: To determine the correlation between socioeconomic conditions and prevalence of pediatric onychomycosis, residential distribution of the patients were investigated. Patients living in urban area (45 children, 76.3%) were more likely to have onychomychosis than those living in rural areas (14 children; 23.7%) (Fig. 6).


Onychomycosis in children: an experience of 59 cases.

Kim DM, Suh MK, Ha GY - Ann Dermatol (2013)

Residence of patients with onychomycosis in children.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756198&req=5

Figure 6: Residence of patients with onychomycosis in children.
Mentions: To determine the correlation between socioeconomic conditions and prevalence of pediatric onychomycosis, residential distribution of the patients were investigated. Patients living in urban area (45 children, 76.3%) were more likely to have onychomychosis than those living in rural areas (14 children; 23.7%) (Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: Fourteen (23.7%) children had concomitant tinea pedis infection, and tinea pedis or onychomycosis was also found in eight of the parents (13.6%).Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis was the most common (62.7%) clinical type.In fingernails, C. albicans was the most common isolated pathogen (50.0%), followed by T. rubrum (10.0%), C. parapsilosis (10.0%), and C. glabrata (5.0%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Gyeongju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Although tinea unguium in children has been studied in the past, no specific etiological agents of onychomycosis in children has been reported in Korea.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate onychomycosis in Korean children.

Methods: We reviewed fifty nine patients with onychomycosis in children (0~18 years of age) who presented during the ten-year period between 1999 and 2009. Etiological agents were identified by cultures on Sabouraud's dextrose agar with and without cycloheximide. An isolated colony of yeasts was considered as pathogens if the same fungal element was identified at initial direct microscopy and in specimen-yielding cultures at a follow-up visit.

Results: Onychomycosis in children represented 2.3% of all onychomycosis. Of the 59 pediatric patients with onychomycosis, 66.1% had toenail onychomycosis with the rest (33.9%) having fingernail onychomycosis. The male-to-female ratio was 1.95:1. Fourteen (23.7%) children had concomitant tinea pedis infection, and tinea pedis or onychomycosis was also found in eight of the parents (13.6%). Distal and lateral subungual onychomycosis was the most common (62.7%) clinical type. In toenails, Trichophyton rubrum was the most common etiological agent (51.3%), followed by Candida albicans (10.2%), C. parapsilosis (5.1%), C. tropicalis (2.6%), and C. guilliermondii (2.6%). In fingernails, C. albicans was the most common isolated pathogen (50.0%), followed by T. rubrum (10.0%), C. parapsilosis (10.0%), and C. glabrata (5.0%).

Conclusion: Because of the increase in pediatric onychomycosis, we suggest the need for a careful mycological examination of children who are diagnosed with onychomycosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus