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Assessment of Psychosocial Status among Short-stature Children with and without Growth Hormone Therapy and Their Parents.

Naiki Y, Horikawa R, Tanaka T, Child Health and Development Netwo - Clin Pediatr Endocrinol (2013)

Bottom Line: Ninety-eight percent of parents of children with GHT and 83% of parents of children without GHT had expected the current treatment strategy to be effective.It is important for doctors to inform their patients regarding realistic height expectations before starting GHT.Additionally, medical consultation is recommended for patients who remain below -2 SD in height despite GHT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
To evaluate the psychosocial status of short children with and without growth hormone therapy (GHT) and that of their parents, self-administered questionnaires were collected from patients and parents who regularly visit the outpatient clinics participating in the Child Health and Development Network. Completed questionnaires were received for one hundred and thirteen patients with GHT and 67 patients without GHT. According to the parents, both children with GHT and without GHT have no difficulty in their daily lives (89% vs. 95%) and are positive (56% vs. 65%), respectively. Ninety-eight percent of parents of children with GHT and 83% of parents of children without GHT had expected the current treatment strategy to be effective. Parents of children with GHT are more satisfied with the current therapy than those without GHT (79% vs. 50%), and feel less anxiety about the on-going therapy than (31% vs. 58%, respectively). Children treated with or without equally reported having no difficulty in their daily lives (90% vs. 93%), and being positive in their lives (81% vs. 75%, respectively) despite their short stature. Although less than one third of the patients have been bullied in their classroom (26% with GHT vs. 29% without GHT), younger and shorter children tend to be bullied more often. Short children undergoing GHT and their parents have anxiety regarding their height and expectations of the effect of GHT. It is important for doctors to inform their patients regarding realistic height expectations before starting GHT. Additionally, medical consultation is recommended for patients who remain below -2 SD in height despite GHT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Numbers of children being bullied by peers according to their GHT status, age rangeand height. The numbers are divided by the patient’s age (younger than 9 yr old, agebetween 10 to 12 yr old and older than 13 yr old). Each group was also divided bypatient height below or above –2SD. The upper panel shows patients with GHT, and thelower panel shows those without GHT. Black bars indicate numbers of patients that havebeen bullied and gray bars show the numbers of those who have not been bullied.
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fig_004: Numbers of children being bullied by peers according to their GHT status, age rangeand height. The numbers are divided by the patient’s age (younger than 9 yr old, agebetween 10 to 12 yr old and older than 13 yr old). Each group was also divided bypatient height below or above –2SD. The upper panel shows patients with GHT, and thelower panel shows those without GHT. Black bars indicate numbers of patients that havebeen bullied and gray bars show the numbers of those who have not been bullied.

Mentions: Children who received GHT and those who did not reported a similar likelihood of feelinginferior about their shortness (79% vs. 83%), being unsatisfied with their height (84% vs.90%), expecting GHT to make them taller (81% vs. 75%), having no difficulty in their dailylived (90% vs. 93%), being positive (81% vs. 75%), having been bullied in their classroom(26% vs. 29%), and worrying about their height (56% vs. 55%), respectively. However,children receiving GHT showed a greater expectation to be taller versus those without GHT(97% vs. 83%, respectively). Also, there was a tendency for patients of a younger age andshorter stature to be more likely to be bullied (Fig.4Fig. 4


Assessment of Psychosocial Status among Short-stature Children with and without Growth Hormone Therapy and Their Parents.

Naiki Y, Horikawa R, Tanaka T, Child Health and Development Netwo - Clin Pediatr Endocrinol (2013)

Numbers of children being bullied by peers according to their GHT status, age rangeand height. The numbers are divided by the patient’s age (younger than 9 yr old, agebetween 10 to 12 yr old and older than 13 yr old). Each group was also divided bypatient height below or above –2SD. The upper panel shows patients with GHT, and thelower panel shows those without GHT. Black bars indicate numbers of patients that havebeen bullied and gray bars show the numbers of those who have not been bullied.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756184&req=5

fig_004: Numbers of children being bullied by peers according to their GHT status, age rangeand height. The numbers are divided by the patient’s age (younger than 9 yr old, agebetween 10 to 12 yr old and older than 13 yr old). Each group was also divided bypatient height below or above –2SD. The upper panel shows patients with GHT, and thelower panel shows those without GHT. Black bars indicate numbers of patients that havebeen bullied and gray bars show the numbers of those who have not been bullied.
Mentions: Children who received GHT and those who did not reported a similar likelihood of feelinginferior about their shortness (79% vs. 83%), being unsatisfied with their height (84% vs.90%), expecting GHT to make them taller (81% vs. 75%), having no difficulty in their dailylived (90% vs. 93%), being positive (81% vs. 75%), having been bullied in their classroom(26% vs. 29%), and worrying about their height (56% vs. 55%), respectively. However,children receiving GHT showed a greater expectation to be taller versus those without GHT(97% vs. 83%, respectively). Also, there was a tendency for patients of a younger age andshorter stature to be more likely to be bullied (Fig.4Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Ninety-eight percent of parents of children with GHT and 83% of parents of children without GHT had expected the current treatment strategy to be effective.It is important for doctors to inform their patients regarding realistic height expectations before starting GHT.Additionally, medical consultation is recommended for patients who remain below -2 SD in height despite GHT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
To evaluate the psychosocial status of short children with and without growth hormone therapy (GHT) and that of their parents, self-administered questionnaires were collected from patients and parents who regularly visit the outpatient clinics participating in the Child Health and Development Network. Completed questionnaires were received for one hundred and thirteen patients with GHT and 67 patients without GHT. According to the parents, both children with GHT and without GHT have no difficulty in their daily lives (89% vs. 95%) and are positive (56% vs. 65%), respectively. Ninety-eight percent of parents of children with GHT and 83% of parents of children without GHT had expected the current treatment strategy to be effective. Parents of children with GHT are more satisfied with the current therapy than those without GHT (79% vs. 50%), and feel less anxiety about the on-going therapy than (31% vs. 58%, respectively). Children treated with or without equally reported having no difficulty in their daily lives (90% vs. 93%), and being positive in their lives (81% vs. 75%, respectively) despite their short stature. Although less than one third of the patients have been bullied in their classroom (26% with GHT vs. 29% without GHT), younger and shorter children tend to be bullied more often. Short children undergoing GHT and their parents have anxiety regarding their height and expectations of the effect of GHT. It is important for doctors to inform their patients regarding realistic height expectations before starting GHT. Additionally, medical consultation is recommended for patients who remain below -2 SD in height despite GHT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus