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Seasonal variation in skin sensitivity to aeroallergens.

Choi IS, Lee SS, Myeong E, Lee JW, Kim WJ, Jin J - Allergy Asthma Immunol Res (2013)

Bottom Line: The test results from subjects aged ≤60 years were compared between the groups classified according to the season when the patients received the tests (spring: March-May, summer: June-August, fall: September-November, winter: December-February).The skin sensitization rates to D. pteronyssinus (23.2% vs. 32.1%, P=0.004) and D. farinae (22.2% vs. 30.2%, P=0.009) were significantly lower in the summer and higher in the fall (38.3% vs. 26.6% and 35.6% vs. 25.3%; P=0.001 respectively) than those in other seasons in patients with a respiratory allergy (n=1,102).Non-respiratory allergy patients also showed seasonal variation in sensitivity to aeroallergens, which might be related to the "priming" effect of allergens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Allergy, Chonnam National University Medical School and Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We previously demonstrated seasonal variation in sensitization to aeroallergens in a small group of patients with exercise-induced asthma. This study was performed to confirm the relationship in a much larger population.

Methods: The charts of 1,891 patients who received allergy skin prick tests were reviewed retrospectively. The test results from subjects aged ≤60 years were compared between the groups classified according to the season when the patients received the tests (spring: March-May, summer: June-August, fall: September-November, winter: December-February). The data from 25 respiratory allergy patients who received the tests two or more times and showed a positive response at least once were analyzed longitudinally.

Results: The most prevalent among 29 tested aeroallergens were house dust mites (HDMs) Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae. The skin sensitization rates to D. pteronyssinus (23.2% vs. 32.1%, P=0.004) and D. farinae (22.2% vs. 30.2%, P=0.009) were significantly lower in the summer and higher in the fall (38.3% vs. 26.6% and 35.6% vs. 25.3%; P=0.001 respectively) than those in other seasons in patients with a respiratory allergy (n=1,102). The sensitization rates to weed pollens in the fall (13.9% vs. 8.3%, P=0.006) and to Aspergillus fumigatus in the winter (2.9% vs. 0.7%, P=0.005) were significantly higher. In patients with non-respiratory allergy such as urticaria/anaphylaxis (n=340), the D. farinae sensitization rate was significantly lower in the summer also but higher in the spring. The trend of the HDM sensitization rate being lower in the summer and higher in the fall was observed in the longitudinal study.

Conclusions: Skin sensitivity to aeroallergens such as HDMs, pollens, and molds demonstrates seasonal variation in respiratory allergy patients. Non-respiratory allergy patients also showed seasonal variation in sensitivity to aeroallergens, which might be related to the "priming" effect of allergens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Rate of clinically significant positive responses (≥100% of allergen/histamine wheal size ratio) to skin prick tests with aeroallergens in patients with respiratory or non-respiratory allergy such as urticaria/anaphylaxis. *P<0.05, †P<0.01, and ‡P<0.001 compared to other seasons.
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Figure 1: Rate of clinically significant positive responses (≥100% of allergen/histamine wheal size ratio) to skin prick tests with aeroallergens in patients with respiratory or non-respiratory allergy such as urticaria/anaphylaxis. *P<0.05, †P<0.01, and ‡P<0.001 compared to other seasons.

Mentions: There was a significant difference in the rate of positive response to D. farinae among seasons in both patients with respiratory allergy and those with non-respiratory allergy (Fig. 1). However, the seasonal variation in the D. pteronyssinus sensitivity was only significant in respiratory allergy patients. The skin sensitization rate to D. pteronyssinus was significantly lower in the summer (23.2% vs. 32.1%, P=0.004) and higher in the fall (38.3% vs. 26.6%, P=0.000) than in the other seasons in patients with respiratory allergy. Similarly, the D. farinae sensitization rate was also significantly lower in the summer (22.2% vs. 30.2%, P=0.009) and higher in the fall (35.6% vs. 25.3%, P<0.001). The rate of sensitization to D. farinae was significantly higher in the spring (33.7% vs. 17.1%, P<0.001) and lower in the summer (14.1% vs. 24.9%, P=0.029) than in the other seasons in non-respiratory allergy patients.


Seasonal variation in skin sensitivity to aeroallergens.

Choi IS, Lee SS, Myeong E, Lee JW, Kim WJ, Jin J - Allergy Asthma Immunol Res (2013)

Rate of clinically significant positive responses (≥100% of allergen/histamine wheal size ratio) to skin prick tests with aeroallergens in patients with respiratory or non-respiratory allergy such as urticaria/anaphylaxis. *P<0.05, †P<0.01, and ‡P<0.001 compared to other seasons.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756177&req=5

Figure 1: Rate of clinically significant positive responses (≥100% of allergen/histamine wheal size ratio) to skin prick tests with aeroallergens in patients with respiratory or non-respiratory allergy such as urticaria/anaphylaxis. *P<0.05, †P<0.01, and ‡P<0.001 compared to other seasons.
Mentions: There was a significant difference in the rate of positive response to D. farinae among seasons in both patients with respiratory allergy and those with non-respiratory allergy (Fig. 1). However, the seasonal variation in the D. pteronyssinus sensitivity was only significant in respiratory allergy patients. The skin sensitization rate to D. pteronyssinus was significantly lower in the summer (23.2% vs. 32.1%, P=0.004) and higher in the fall (38.3% vs. 26.6%, P=0.000) than in the other seasons in patients with respiratory allergy. Similarly, the D. farinae sensitization rate was also significantly lower in the summer (22.2% vs. 30.2%, P=0.009) and higher in the fall (35.6% vs. 25.3%, P<0.001). The rate of sensitization to D. farinae was significantly higher in the spring (33.7% vs. 17.1%, P<0.001) and lower in the summer (14.1% vs. 24.9%, P=0.029) than in the other seasons in non-respiratory allergy patients.

Bottom Line: The test results from subjects aged ≤60 years were compared between the groups classified according to the season when the patients received the tests (spring: March-May, summer: June-August, fall: September-November, winter: December-February).The skin sensitization rates to D. pteronyssinus (23.2% vs. 32.1%, P=0.004) and D. farinae (22.2% vs. 30.2%, P=0.009) were significantly lower in the summer and higher in the fall (38.3% vs. 26.6% and 35.6% vs. 25.3%; P=0.001 respectively) than those in other seasons in patients with a respiratory allergy (n=1,102).Non-respiratory allergy patients also showed seasonal variation in sensitivity to aeroallergens, which might be related to the "priming" effect of allergens.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Allergy, Chonnam National University Medical School and Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: We previously demonstrated seasonal variation in sensitization to aeroallergens in a small group of patients with exercise-induced asthma. This study was performed to confirm the relationship in a much larger population.

Methods: The charts of 1,891 patients who received allergy skin prick tests were reviewed retrospectively. The test results from subjects aged ≤60 years were compared between the groups classified according to the season when the patients received the tests (spring: March-May, summer: June-August, fall: September-November, winter: December-February). The data from 25 respiratory allergy patients who received the tests two or more times and showed a positive response at least once were analyzed longitudinally.

Results: The most prevalent among 29 tested aeroallergens were house dust mites (HDMs) Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and D. farinae. The skin sensitization rates to D. pteronyssinus (23.2% vs. 32.1%, P=0.004) and D. farinae (22.2% vs. 30.2%, P=0.009) were significantly lower in the summer and higher in the fall (38.3% vs. 26.6% and 35.6% vs. 25.3%; P=0.001 respectively) than those in other seasons in patients with a respiratory allergy (n=1,102). The sensitization rates to weed pollens in the fall (13.9% vs. 8.3%, P=0.006) and to Aspergillus fumigatus in the winter (2.9% vs. 0.7%, P=0.005) were significantly higher. In patients with non-respiratory allergy such as urticaria/anaphylaxis (n=340), the D. farinae sensitization rate was significantly lower in the summer also but higher in the spring. The trend of the HDM sensitization rate being lower in the summer and higher in the fall was observed in the longitudinal study.

Conclusions: Skin sensitivity to aeroallergens such as HDMs, pollens, and molds demonstrates seasonal variation in respiratory allergy patients. Non-respiratory allergy patients also showed seasonal variation in sensitivity to aeroallergens, which might be related to the "priming" effect of allergens.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus