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Association between pet ownership and the sensitization to pet allergens in adults with various allergic diseases.

Park YB, Mo EK, Lee JY, Kim JH, Kim CH, Hyun IG, Choi JH - Allergy Asthma Immunol Res (2013)

Bottom Line: We performed skin prick tests with 55 common inhalant and food allergens, including dog, cat, and rabbit allergens.A mean wheal diameter of 3 mm or greater was considered a positive reaction.Direct exposure to dogs (72.0%) was significantly higher than that of other animals (18.4% for cats and 16.7% for rabbits), whereas 'no contact' with cats (78.3%) and rabbits (83.3%) was significantly higher than with dogs (26.8%; P<0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea. ; Lung Research Institute of Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: As pet ownership increases, sensitization to animal allergens due to domestic exposure is a concern. Sensitization to animal allergens may occur from indirect exposure, as well as direct ownership of animals. However, there have been conflicting results regarding the association between pet ownership and sensitization to animal allergens in adults.

Methods: In total, 401 patients with various allergic diseases were enrolled in this study. We performed skin prick tests with 55 common inhalant and food allergens, including dog, cat, and rabbit allergens. A mean wheal diameter of 3 mm or greater was considered a positive reaction. The exposure modality to each animal allergen was investigated using a questionnaire and included present ownership, past ownership, occupational exposure, occasional exposure, contact with pet owner, and no contact. Present ownership, past ownership, occupational, and occasional exposure were regarded as direct exposure.

Results: The sensitization rate for animal allergens was 20.4% for dog, 15.0% for cat, and 9.0% for rabbit. Direct exposure to dogs (72.0%) was significantly higher than that of other animals (18.4% for cats and 16.7% for rabbits), whereas 'no contact' with cats (78.3%) and rabbits (83.3%) was significantly higher than with dogs (26.8%; P<0.0001). Independent risk factors for sensitization to animal allergens were sensitization to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (OR=2.4, P=0.052), Dermatophagoides farinae (OR=5.1, P<0.001), cat (OR=4.4, P<0.0001), and direct exposure to dogs (OR=1.5, P=0.029) for dog, and sensitization to dog (OR=4.4, P<0.0001) and rabbit (OR=2.6, P=0.036) for cats. Finally, for rabbits, the independent risk factor was sensitization to Alternaria (OR=6.0, P<0.002).

Conclusions: These results suggest that direct exposure to dogs contributes to the sensitization to dog allergens in patients with allergic diseases, whereas indirect exposure to cats and rabbits may induce sensitization to each animal's allergen.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The sensitization rate of common inhalant allergens in the study subjects. Dp, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus; Df, Dermatophagoides farinae.
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Figure 2: The sensitization rate of common inhalant allergens in the study subjects. Dp, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus; Df, Dermatophagoides farinae.

Mentions: In total, 401 patients were enrolled in this study. The mean age of the study subjects was 40.9±15.6 years with a range of 16 to 82, and 201 (50.1%) subjects were male. Of the subjects, 178 (44.4%) had a family history of allergic diseases. The most common clinical diagnosis of the patients was chronic cough (34.2%), followed by asthma (28.2%), allergic rhinitis (11.2%), urticaria (3.2%), and atopic dermatitis (2.5%). The prevalence of pet ownership in the past was 55.8% (dog: 52.9%, cat: 3.1%, rabbit: 7.6%), and the prevalence of pet ownership at present was 22.2% (dog: 83.1%, cat: 2.2%, rabbit: 0.2%). Sensitization rates to common inhalant allergens in the study subjects were 47.1% for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, 47.4% for Dermatophagoides farinae, 5.7% for Alternaria, 20.4% for dog epithelium, 15.0% for cat epithelium, 9.0% for rabbit epithelium, 10.7% for birch, 12.0% for ragweed, and 13.5% for mugwort (Fig. 2).


Association between pet ownership and the sensitization to pet allergens in adults with various allergic diseases.

Park YB, Mo EK, Lee JY, Kim JH, Kim CH, Hyun IG, Choi JH - Allergy Asthma Immunol Res (2013)

The sensitization rate of common inhalant allergens in the study subjects. Dp, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus; Df, Dermatophagoides farinae.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756176&req=5

Figure 2: The sensitization rate of common inhalant allergens in the study subjects. Dp, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus; Df, Dermatophagoides farinae.
Mentions: In total, 401 patients were enrolled in this study. The mean age of the study subjects was 40.9±15.6 years with a range of 16 to 82, and 201 (50.1%) subjects were male. Of the subjects, 178 (44.4%) had a family history of allergic diseases. The most common clinical diagnosis of the patients was chronic cough (34.2%), followed by asthma (28.2%), allergic rhinitis (11.2%), urticaria (3.2%), and atopic dermatitis (2.5%). The prevalence of pet ownership in the past was 55.8% (dog: 52.9%, cat: 3.1%, rabbit: 7.6%), and the prevalence of pet ownership at present was 22.2% (dog: 83.1%, cat: 2.2%, rabbit: 0.2%). Sensitization rates to common inhalant allergens in the study subjects were 47.1% for Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, 47.4% for Dermatophagoides farinae, 5.7% for Alternaria, 20.4% for dog epithelium, 15.0% for cat epithelium, 9.0% for rabbit epithelium, 10.7% for birch, 12.0% for ragweed, and 13.5% for mugwort (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: We performed skin prick tests with 55 common inhalant and food allergens, including dog, cat, and rabbit allergens.A mean wheal diameter of 3 mm or greater was considered a positive reaction.Direct exposure to dogs (72.0%) was significantly higher than that of other animals (18.4% for cats and 16.7% for rabbits), whereas 'no contact' with cats (78.3%) and rabbits (83.3%) was significantly higher than with dogs (26.8%; P<0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea. ; Lung Research Institute of Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: As pet ownership increases, sensitization to animal allergens due to domestic exposure is a concern. Sensitization to animal allergens may occur from indirect exposure, as well as direct ownership of animals. However, there have been conflicting results regarding the association between pet ownership and sensitization to animal allergens in adults.

Methods: In total, 401 patients with various allergic diseases were enrolled in this study. We performed skin prick tests with 55 common inhalant and food allergens, including dog, cat, and rabbit allergens. A mean wheal diameter of 3 mm or greater was considered a positive reaction. The exposure modality to each animal allergen was investigated using a questionnaire and included present ownership, past ownership, occupational exposure, occasional exposure, contact with pet owner, and no contact. Present ownership, past ownership, occupational, and occasional exposure were regarded as direct exposure.

Results: The sensitization rate for animal allergens was 20.4% for dog, 15.0% for cat, and 9.0% for rabbit. Direct exposure to dogs (72.0%) was significantly higher than that of other animals (18.4% for cats and 16.7% for rabbits), whereas 'no contact' with cats (78.3%) and rabbits (83.3%) was significantly higher than with dogs (26.8%; P<0.0001). Independent risk factors for sensitization to animal allergens were sensitization to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (OR=2.4, P=0.052), Dermatophagoides farinae (OR=5.1, P<0.001), cat (OR=4.4, P<0.0001), and direct exposure to dogs (OR=1.5, P=0.029) for dog, and sensitization to dog (OR=4.4, P<0.0001) and rabbit (OR=2.6, P=0.036) for cats. Finally, for rabbits, the independent risk factor was sensitization to Alternaria (OR=6.0, P<0.002).

Conclusions: These results suggest that direct exposure to dogs contributes to the sensitization to dog allergens in patients with allergic diseases, whereas indirect exposure to cats and rabbits may induce sensitization to each animal's allergen.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus