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Single and multiple valve surgery in native valve infective endocarditis.

Kim TS, Na CY, Oh SS, Kim JH, Yie GS, Han JW, Chae MC - Korean J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg (2013)

Bottom Line: The overall survival (p=0.913) and valve-related event-free survival (p=0.204) did not differ between the two groups.The independent predictor of postoperative complications was New York Heart Association class (p=0.001).The number of surgically corrected valves in native IE seems to be unrelated to perioperative and long-term outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Sejong General Hospital, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) remains a challenge, especially in cases of multiple valve surgery. We evaluated the clinical outcomes of native valve IE and compared the outcomes of single valve surgery with those of multiple valve surgery.

Materials and methods: From 1997 to 2011, 90 patients underwent surgery for native valve IE; 67 patients with single valve surgery (single valve group) and 23 patients with multiple valve surgery (multiple valve group). The mean follow-up duration was 73.1±47.4 months.

Results: The surgical mortality in the total cohort was 4.4%. The overall survival (p=0.913) and valve-related event-free survival (p=0.204) did not differ between the two groups. The independent predictor of postoperative complications was New York Heart Association class (p=0.001). Multiple valve surgery was not a significant predictor of surgical mortality (p=0.225) or late mortality (p=0.936). Uncontrolled infection, urgent or emergency surgery, and postoperative complications were identified as independent predictors of valve-related morbidity, excluding multiple valve surgery (p=0.072).

Conclusion: In native valve IE, multiple valve surgery as a factor was not an independent predictor of mortality and morbidity. The number of surgically corrected valves in native IE seems to be unrelated to perioperative and long-term outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The actuarial valve-related event-free survival in the single valve and multiple valve groups (log rank, p=0.204).
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Figure 2: The actuarial valve-related event-free survival in the single valve and multiple valve groups (log rank, p=0.204).

Mentions: The actuarial valve-related event-free survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 91.8%±3.5%, 86.4%±4.5%, and 74.2%±6.4% in the single valve group, and 95.2%±4.6%, 95.2%±4.6%, and 88.4%±7.8% in the multiple valve group, respectively (p=0.204) (Fig. 2).


Single and multiple valve surgery in native valve infective endocarditis.

Kim TS, Na CY, Oh SS, Kim JH, Yie GS, Han JW, Chae MC - Korean J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg (2013)

The actuarial valve-related event-free survival in the single valve and multiple valve groups (log rank, p=0.204).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756156&req=5

Figure 2: The actuarial valve-related event-free survival in the single valve and multiple valve groups (log rank, p=0.204).
Mentions: The actuarial valve-related event-free survival rates at 1, 2, and 5 years were 91.8%±3.5%, 86.4%±4.5%, and 74.2%±6.4% in the single valve group, and 95.2%±4.6%, 95.2%±4.6%, and 88.4%±7.8% in the multiple valve group, respectively (p=0.204) (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: The overall survival (p=0.913) and valve-related event-free survival (p=0.204) did not differ between the two groups.The independent predictor of postoperative complications was New York Heart Association class (p=0.001).The number of surgically corrected valves in native IE seems to be unrelated to perioperative and long-term outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Sejong General Hospital, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Surgical treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) remains a challenge, especially in cases of multiple valve surgery. We evaluated the clinical outcomes of native valve IE and compared the outcomes of single valve surgery with those of multiple valve surgery.

Materials and methods: From 1997 to 2011, 90 patients underwent surgery for native valve IE; 67 patients with single valve surgery (single valve group) and 23 patients with multiple valve surgery (multiple valve group). The mean follow-up duration was 73.1±47.4 months.

Results: The surgical mortality in the total cohort was 4.4%. The overall survival (p=0.913) and valve-related event-free survival (p=0.204) did not differ between the two groups. The independent predictor of postoperative complications was New York Heart Association class (p=0.001). Multiple valve surgery was not a significant predictor of surgical mortality (p=0.225) or late mortality (p=0.936). Uncontrolled infection, urgent or emergency surgery, and postoperative complications were identified as independent predictors of valve-related morbidity, excluding multiple valve surgery (p=0.072).

Conclusion: In native valve IE, multiple valve surgery as a factor was not an independent predictor of mortality and morbidity. The number of surgically corrected valves in native IE seems to be unrelated to perioperative and long-term outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus