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Upward migration of a peritoneal catheter following ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

Cho KR, Yeon JY, Shin HJ - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

Bottom Line: The peritoneal catheter, connected to an 'ultra small, low pressure valve system' (Strata®; PS Medical,Gola, CA, USA) at the subgaleal space, was placed into the peritoneal cavity about 30 cm in length.The patient returned to our hospital due to scalp swelling 21 days after the surgery.Simple X-ray images revealed total upward migration and coiling of the peritoneal catheter around the valve.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
We present an unusual case of peritoneal catheter migration following a ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation. A 7-month-old infant, who had suffered from intraventricular hemorrhage at birth, was shunted for progressive hydrocephalus. The peritoneal catheter, connected to an 'ultra small, low pressure valve system' (Strata®; PS Medical,Gola, CA, USA) at the subgaleal space, was placed into the peritoneal cavity about 30 cm in length. The patient returned to our hospital due to scalp swelling 21 days after the surgery. Simple X-ray images revealed total upward migration and coiling of the peritoneal catheter around the valve. Possible mechanisms leading to proximal upward migration of a peritoneal catheter are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A : Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan of the initial ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. Ventricle size decreased with the shunt tip placed properly in the ventricle horn. Subdural hygroma and encephalomatic lesions are seen together. B : CT taken before revision surgery. Ventricle size decreased compared to that on the previous CT scan. The distal catheter has migrated upward and coiled around the shunt reservoir.
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Figure 3: A : Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan of the initial ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. Ventricle size decreased with the shunt tip placed properly in the ventricle horn. Subdural hygroma and encephalomatic lesions are seen together. B : CT taken before revision surgery. Ventricle size decreased compared to that on the previous CT scan. The distal catheter has migrated upward and coiled around the shunt reservoir.

Mentions: He visited our outpatient office with prominent swelling of the surgical site 21 days after surgery, and a round coil like mass was palpable under the scalp, but no neurological changes were noticed. Simple chest, abdomen, and skull X-ray images were taken, and no shunt catheter on the trunk was found, but the distal catheter had migrated upward into the subgaleal space (Fig. 2). Brain computed tomography scans indicated decreased ventricle size compared to those taken before surgery (Fig. 3). Shunted cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was thought to be absorbed in the subgaleal space and shunt function seemed to be maintained.


Upward migration of a peritoneal catheter following ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

Cho KR, Yeon JY, Shin HJ - J Korean Neurosurg Soc (2013)

A : Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan of the initial ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. Ventricle size decreased with the shunt tip placed properly in the ventricle horn. Subdural hygroma and encephalomatic lesions are seen together. B : CT taken before revision surgery. Ventricle size decreased compared to that on the previous CT scan. The distal catheter has migrated upward and coiled around the shunt reservoir.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756136&req=5

Figure 3: A : Postoperative computed tomography (CT) scan of the initial ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. Ventricle size decreased with the shunt tip placed properly in the ventricle horn. Subdural hygroma and encephalomatic lesions are seen together. B : CT taken before revision surgery. Ventricle size decreased compared to that on the previous CT scan. The distal catheter has migrated upward and coiled around the shunt reservoir.
Mentions: He visited our outpatient office with prominent swelling of the surgical site 21 days after surgery, and a round coil like mass was palpable under the scalp, but no neurological changes were noticed. Simple chest, abdomen, and skull X-ray images were taken, and no shunt catheter on the trunk was found, but the distal catheter had migrated upward into the subgaleal space (Fig. 2). Brain computed tomography scans indicated decreased ventricle size compared to those taken before surgery (Fig. 3). Shunted cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was thought to be absorbed in the subgaleal space and shunt function seemed to be maintained.

Bottom Line: The peritoneal catheter, connected to an 'ultra small, low pressure valve system' (Strata®; PS Medical,Gola, CA, USA) at the subgaleal space, was placed into the peritoneal cavity about 30 cm in length.The patient returned to our hospital due to scalp swelling 21 days after the surgery.Simple X-ray images revealed total upward migration and coiling of the peritoneal catheter around the valve.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
We present an unusual case of peritoneal catheter migration following a ventriculoperitoneal shunt operation. A 7-month-old infant, who had suffered from intraventricular hemorrhage at birth, was shunted for progressive hydrocephalus. The peritoneal catheter, connected to an 'ultra small, low pressure valve system' (Strata®; PS Medical,Gola, CA, USA) at the subgaleal space, was placed into the peritoneal cavity about 30 cm in length. The patient returned to our hospital due to scalp swelling 21 days after the surgery. Simple X-ray images revealed total upward migration and coiling of the peritoneal catheter around the valve. Possible mechanisms leading to proximal upward migration of a peritoneal catheter are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus