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Perceived stress at work is associated with lower levels of DHEA-S.

Lennartsson AK, Theorell T, Rockwood AL, Kushnir MM, Jonsdottir IH - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: It is known that long-term psychosocial stress may cause or contribute to different diseases and symptoms and accelerate aging.The mean DHEA-S levels were 23% lower in the subjects who reported stress at work compared to the non-stressed group.This study indicates that stressed individual have markedly lower levels of DHEA-S.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Stress Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden ; The Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: It is known that long-term psychosocial stress may cause or contribute to different diseases and symptoms and accelerate aging. One of the consequences of prolonged psychosocial stress may be a negative effect on the levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphated metabolite dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S). The aim of this study is to investigate whether levels of DHEA and DHEA-S differ in individuals who report perceived stress at work compared to individuals who report no perceived stress at work.

Methods: Morning fasting DHEA-S and DHEA levels were measured in serum in a non-stressed group (n = 40) and a stressed group (n = 41). DHEA and DHEA-S levels were compared between the groups using ANCOVA, controlling for age.

Results: The mean DHEA-S levels were 23% lower in the subjects who reported stress at work compared to the non-stressed group. Statistical analysis (ANCOVA) showed a significant difference in DHEA-S levels between the groups (p = 0.010). There was no difference in DHEA level between the groups.

Conclusions: This study indicates that stressed individual have markedly lower levels of DHEA-S. Given the important and beneficial functions of DHEA and DHEA-S, lower levels of DHEA-S may constitute one link between psychosocial stress, ill health and accelerated ageing.

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Mean (95% CI) DHEA-S levels in the stressed and the non-stressed individuals.
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pone-0072460-g003: Mean (95% CI) DHEA-S levels in the stressed and the non-stressed individuals.

Mentions: DHEA-S and DHEA levels in the stressed and non-stressed group are reported in Table 1 and Figure 3. DHEA-S levels were significantly lower [F(1,78) = 6.9, p = 0.010, partial eta squared = 0.08) in the group of individuals reporting stress at work compared to the individuals in the non-stressed group, after controlling for age. Mean DHEA-S level in the stressed group were 23% lower than mean DHEA-S level in the non-stressed group (same pattern in both men and women). There was no difference in DHEA levels between the stressed and the non-stressed group, after controlling for age (p = 0.343).


Perceived stress at work is associated with lower levels of DHEA-S.

Lennartsson AK, Theorell T, Rockwood AL, Kushnir MM, Jonsdottir IH - PLoS ONE (2013)

Mean (95% CI) DHEA-S levels in the stressed and the non-stressed individuals.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756071&req=5

pone-0072460-g003: Mean (95% CI) DHEA-S levels in the stressed and the non-stressed individuals.
Mentions: DHEA-S and DHEA levels in the stressed and non-stressed group are reported in Table 1 and Figure 3. DHEA-S levels were significantly lower [F(1,78) = 6.9, p = 0.010, partial eta squared = 0.08) in the group of individuals reporting stress at work compared to the individuals in the non-stressed group, after controlling for age. Mean DHEA-S level in the stressed group were 23% lower than mean DHEA-S level in the non-stressed group (same pattern in both men and women). There was no difference in DHEA levels between the stressed and the non-stressed group, after controlling for age (p = 0.343).

Bottom Line: It is known that long-term psychosocial stress may cause or contribute to different diseases and symptoms and accelerate aging.The mean DHEA-S levels were 23% lower in the subjects who reported stress at work compared to the non-stressed group.This study indicates that stressed individual have markedly lower levels of DHEA-S.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute of Stress Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden ; The Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Background: It is known that long-term psychosocial stress may cause or contribute to different diseases and symptoms and accelerate aging. One of the consequences of prolonged psychosocial stress may be a negative effect on the levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphated metabolite dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S). The aim of this study is to investigate whether levels of DHEA and DHEA-S differ in individuals who report perceived stress at work compared to individuals who report no perceived stress at work.

Methods: Morning fasting DHEA-S and DHEA levels were measured in serum in a non-stressed group (n = 40) and a stressed group (n = 41). DHEA and DHEA-S levels were compared between the groups using ANCOVA, controlling for age.

Results: The mean DHEA-S levels were 23% lower in the subjects who reported stress at work compared to the non-stressed group. Statistical analysis (ANCOVA) showed a significant difference in DHEA-S levels between the groups (p = 0.010). There was no difference in DHEA level between the groups.

Conclusions: This study indicates that stressed individual have markedly lower levels of DHEA-S. Given the important and beneficial functions of DHEA and DHEA-S, lower levels of DHEA-S may constitute one link between psychosocial stress, ill health and accelerated ageing.

Show MeSH