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Two invaders instead of one: the true identity of species under the name Ceracis cucullatus (Coleoptera: Ciidae).

Antunes-Carvalho C, Lopes-Andrade C - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: As results, we reverse three previous junior synonymies of Cer. cucullatus, proposing Cer. lamellatus (Pic) and Cer. tabellifer (Mellié), both reinstated status and new combinations, as separate species.Based on these data, we discuss possible explanations to the successful invasion of Cer. tabellifer in Africa and elsewhere and its potential threat to native faunas of ciids.This study helps to fulfil an old gap in the literature on biological invasions, with considerably more studies on predatory species, disease vectors or potential pests of agricultural crops, than on non-pest fungivorous organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Entomologia, Departamento de Entomologia, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The Neotropical obligate fungivorous beetle Ceracis cucullatus (Mellié) has attracted attention of coleopterists due to the increasing number of records of populations in Africa. Although its disjunct populations have been interpreted as a cohesive taxonomic unity, previous comparisons between African and Neotropical specimens revealed differences in their external morphology, causing uncertainty about the true unity of the species. Here, we compare the external morphology of specimens named Cer. cucullatus from several localities of the Neotropical, Palearctic, Afrotropical, Afrotemperate and Oriental regions. As results, we reverse three previous junior synonymies of Cer. cucullatus, proposing Cer. lamellatus (Pic) and Cer. tabellifer (Mellié), both reinstated status and new combinations, as separate species. We also propose Enn. bilamellatum Pic as a new synonym of Cer. tabellifer. In face of these taxonomic changes, we identify Cer. tabellifer as the actual invasive species on African lands, instead of Cer. cucullatus as was previously accepted. Then, through historical records gathered from scientific collections and literature, and through examination of recently collected specimens from South Africa and Brazil, we provide data on host fungi and geographic distribution of Cer. tabellifer. Based on these data, we discuss possible explanations to the successful invasion of Cer. tabellifer in Africa and elsewhere and its potential threat to native faunas of ciids. This study helps to fulfil an old gap in the literature on biological invasions, with considerably more studies on predatory species, disease vectors or potential pests of agricultural crops, than on non-pest fungivorous organisms.

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Geographic distribution of Ceracis cucullatus (Mellié), Cer. lamellatus (Pic) and Cer. tabellifer (Mellié).(A) Arrows indicate the possible direction of introductions of Cer. cucullatus and Cer. tabellifer in the Galapagos Islands and Africa, respectively. The records of Cer. tabellifer are divided into four time periods, represented by different colors. Undated records are represented by black circles (see map legend). Between 1800 and 1893, no record was found. (B) Geographic distribution of Cer. cucullatus in the Galapagos Islands. Records of Cer. cucullatus from Cuba and Galapagos Islands (Floreana, Pinta, San Cristobal, Santa Fé, Santiago), and of Cer. tabellifer from Zimbabwe are indicated by “?”, because it was not possible to determine the exact collection site.
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pone-0072319-g009: Geographic distribution of Ceracis cucullatus (Mellié), Cer. lamellatus (Pic) and Cer. tabellifer (Mellié).(A) Arrows indicate the possible direction of introductions of Cer. cucullatus and Cer. tabellifer in the Galapagos Islands and Africa, respectively. The records of Cer. tabellifer are divided into four time periods, represented by different colors. Undated records are represented by black circles (see map legend). Between 1800 and 1893, no record was found. (B) Geographic distribution of Cer. cucullatus in the Galapagos Islands. Records of Cer. cucullatus from Cuba and Galapagos Islands (Floreana, Pinta, San Cristobal, Santa Fé, Santiago), and of Cer. tabellifer from Zimbabwe are indicated by “?”, because it was not possible to determine the exact collection site.

Mentions: Aiming to trace the geographical distribution of Cer. cucullatus, Cer. lamellatus and Cer. tabellifer (Fig. 9), we searched for records of these species by direct observation of labels in museum specimens and throughout literature. Dates for each record on the map were obtained from specimens' labels. For records obtained from scientific literature, we assigned the date of publication of the work providing the information. We estimated latitude and longitude coordinates by tracking localities in the online database GeoNames [18] and plotted them in a map using the software ArcGis 9.3 (ESRI, Redlands, CA, USA).


Two invaders instead of one: the true identity of species under the name Ceracis cucullatus (Coleoptera: Ciidae).

Antunes-Carvalho C, Lopes-Andrade C - PLoS ONE (2013)

Geographic distribution of Ceracis cucullatus (Mellié), Cer. lamellatus (Pic) and Cer. tabellifer (Mellié).(A) Arrows indicate the possible direction of introductions of Cer. cucullatus and Cer. tabellifer in the Galapagos Islands and Africa, respectively. The records of Cer. tabellifer are divided into four time periods, represented by different colors. Undated records are represented by black circles (see map legend). Between 1800 and 1893, no record was found. (B) Geographic distribution of Cer. cucullatus in the Galapagos Islands. Records of Cer. cucullatus from Cuba and Galapagos Islands (Floreana, Pinta, San Cristobal, Santa Fé, Santiago), and of Cer. tabellifer from Zimbabwe are indicated by “?”, because it was not possible to determine the exact collection site.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756068&req=5

pone-0072319-g009: Geographic distribution of Ceracis cucullatus (Mellié), Cer. lamellatus (Pic) and Cer. tabellifer (Mellié).(A) Arrows indicate the possible direction of introductions of Cer. cucullatus and Cer. tabellifer in the Galapagos Islands and Africa, respectively. The records of Cer. tabellifer are divided into four time periods, represented by different colors. Undated records are represented by black circles (see map legend). Between 1800 and 1893, no record was found. (B) Geographic distribution of Cer. cucullatus in the Galapagos Islands. Records of Cer. cucullatus from Cuba and Galapagos Islands (Floreana, Pinta, San Cristobal, Santa Fé, Santiago), and of Cer. tabellifer from Zimbabwe are indicated by “?”, because it was not possible to determine the exact collection site.
Mentions: Aiming to trace the geographical distribution of Cer. cucullatus, Cer. lamellatus and Cer. tabellifer (Fig. 9), we searched for records of these species by direct observation of labels in museum specimens and throughout literature. Dates for each record on the map were obtained from specimens' labels. For records obtained from scientific literature, we assigned the date of publication of the work providing the information. We estimated latitude and longitude coordinates by tracking localities in the online database GeoNames [18] and plotted them in a map using the software ArcGis 9.3 (ESRI, Redlands, CA, USA).

Bottom Line: As results, we reverse three previous junior synonymies of Cer. cucullatus, proposing Cer. lamellatus (Pic) and Cer. tabellifer (Mellié), both reinstated status and new combinations, as separate species.Based on these data, we discuss possible explanations to the successful invasion of Cer. tabellifer in Africa and elsewhere and its potential threat to native faunas of ciids.This study helps to fulfil an old gap in the literature on biological invasions, with considerably more studies on predatory species, disease vectors or potential pests of agricultural crops, than on non-pest fungivorous organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Programa de Pós-Graduação em Entomologia, Departamento de Entomologia, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
The Neotropical obligate fungivorous beetle Ceracis cucullatus (Mellié) has attracted attention of coleopterists due to the increasing number of records of populations in Africa. Although its disjunct populations have been interpreted as a cohesive taxonomic unity, previous comparisons between African and Neotropical specimens revealed differences in their external morphology, causing uncertainty about the true unity of the species. Here, we compare the external morphology of specimens named Cer. cucullatus from several localities of the Neotropical, Palearctic, Afrotropical, Afrotemperate and Oriental regions. As results, we reverse three previous junior synonymies of Cer. cucullatus, proposing Cer. lamellatus (Pic) and Cer. tabellifer (Mellié), both reinstated status and new combinations, as separate species. We also propose Enn. bilamellatum Pic as a new synonym of Cer. tabellifer. In face of these taxonomic changes, we identify Cer. tabellifer as the actual invasive species on African lands, instead of Cer. cucullatus as was previously accepted. Then, through historical records gathered from scientific collections and literature, and through examination of recently collected specimens from South Africa and Brazil, we provide data on host fungi and geographic distribution of Cer. tabellifer. Based on these data, we discuss possible explanations to the successful invasion of Cer. tabellifer in Africa and elsewhere and its potential threat to native faunas of ciids. This study helps to fulfil an old gap in the literature on biological invasions, with considerably more studies on predatory species, disease vectors or potential pests of agricultural crops, than on non-pest fungivorous organisms.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus