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The role of explicit and implicit self-esteem in peer modeling of palatable food intake: a study on social media interaction among youngsters.

Bevelander KE, Anschütz DJ, Creemers DH, Kleinjan M, Engels RC - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Participants with higher ISE adjusted their candy intake to that of a peer more closely than those with lower ISE when the confederate ate nothing compared to when eating a modest (β = .26, p = .05) or considerable amount of candy (kcal) (β = .32, p = .001).In contrast, participants with lower BE modeled peer intake more than those with higher BE when eating nothing compared to a considerable amount of candy (kcal) (β = .21, p = .02); ESE did not moderate social modeling behavior.In addition, participants with higher discrepant or "damaged" self-esteem (i.e., high ISE and low ESE) modeled peer intake more when the peer ate nothing or a modest amount compared to a substantial amount of candy (kcal) (β = -.24, p = .004; β = -.26, p<.0001, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This experimental study investigated the impact of peers on palatable food intake of youngsters within a social media setting. To determine whether this effect was moderated by self-esteem, the present study examined the roles of global explicit self-esteem (ESE), body esteem (BE) and implicit self-esteem (ISE).

Methods: Participants (N = 118; 38.1% boys; M age 11.14±.79) were asked to play a computer game while they believed to interact online with a same-sex normal-weight remote confederate (i.e., instructed peer) who ate either nothing, a small or large amount of candy.

Results: Participants modeled the candy intake of peers via a social media interaction, but this was qualified by their self-esteem. Participants with higher ISE adjusted their candy intake to that of a peer more closely than those with lower ISE when the confederate ate nothing compared to when eating a modest (β = .26, p = .05) or considerable amount of candy (kcal) (β = .32, p = .001). In contrast, participants with lower BE modeled peer intake more than those with higher BE when eating nothing compared to a considerable amount of candy (kcal) (β = .21, p = .02); ESE did not moderate social modeling behavior. In addition, participants with higher discrepant or "damaged" self-esteem (i.e., high ISE and low ESE) modeled peer intake more when the peer ate nothing or a modest amount compared to a substantial amount of candy (kcal) (β = -.24, p = .004; β = -.26, p<.0001, respectively).

Conclusion: Youngsters conform to the amount of palatable food eaten by peers through social media interaction. Those with lower body esteem or damaged self-esteem may be more at risk to peer influences on food intake.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Interaction effects between experimental intake condition, ISE and BE on social modeling of candy intake (kcal).Note: The figure presents an interpretation of the interaction effect plotted with the unstandardized regression coefficients. In BE, there is a significant difference between the no- and high-intake condition for youngsters with lower BE. In ISE, there is a significant difference between the no- and high-, and low- and high-intake condition for those with higher ISE.
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pone-0072481-g003: Interaction effects between experimental intake condition, ISE and BE on social modeling of candy intake (kcal).Note: The figure presents an interpretation of the interaction effect plotted with the unstandardized regression coefficients. In BE, there is a significant difference between the no- and high-intake condition for youngsters with lower BE. In ISE, there is a significant difference between the no- and high-, and low- and high-intake condition for those with higher ISE.

Mentions: The main effect of the experimental intake condition on the participant’s candy intake (kcal) was qualified by an interaction effect between BE and experimental intake condition on participant’s candy intake (kcal). The standardized regression weights of the interaction models are presented in Table 3. There was only a significant difference between the no- versus high-intake condition (β = .21, p = .02). Figure 3 presents the interpretation of the interaction effects for BE. It shows that participants with lower BE followed the candy intake of the remote confederate more closely when they ate a substantial amount of candy compared to nothing. The models were also tested without the participants (n = 9) who wanted to gain weight. The models showed a significant difference between the no- versus high-intake condition (β = .26, p = .02) and between the low- versus high-intake condition (β = .43, p = .04) implying that participants with lower BE followed the candy intake of the remote confederate more closely when they ate nothing or a modest amount compared to a substantial amount of candy.


The role of explicit and implicit self-esteem in peer modeling of palatable food intake: a study on social media interaction among youngsters.

Bevelander KE, Anschütz DJ, Creemers DH, Kleinjan M, Engels RC - PLoS ONE (2013)

Interaction effects between experimental intake condition, ISE and BE on social modeling of candy intake (kcal).Note: The figure presents an interpretation of the interaction effect plotted with the unstandardized regression coefficients. In BE, there is a significant difference between the no- and high-intake condition for youngsters with lower BE. In ISE, there is a significant difference between the no- and high-, and low- and high-intake condition for those with higher ISE.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756026&req=5

pone-0072481-g003: Interaction effects between experimental intake condition, ISE and BE on social modeling of candy intake (kcal).Note: The figure presents an interpretation of the interaction effect plotted with the unstandardized regression coefficients. In BE, there is a significant difference between the no- and high-intake condition for youngsters with lower BE. In ISE, there is a significant difference between the no- and high-, and low- and high-intake condition for those with higher ISE.
Mentions: The main effect of the experimental intake condition on the participant’s candy intake (kcal) was qualified by an interaction effect between BE and experimental intake condition on participant’s candy intake (kcal). The standardized regression weights of the interaction models are presented in Table 3. There was only a significant difference between the no- versus high-intake condition (β = .21, p = .02). Figure 3 presents the interpretation of the interaction effects for BE. It shows that participants with lower BE followed the candy intake of the remote confederate more closely when they ate a substantial amount of candy compared to nothing. The models were also tested without the participants (n = 9) who wanted to gain weight. The models showed a significant difference between the no- versus high-intake condition (β = .26, p = .02) and between the low- versus high-intake condition (β = .43, p = .04) implying that participants with lower BE followed the candy intake of the remote confederate more closely when they ate nothing or a modest amount compared to a substantial amount of candy.

Bottom Line: Participants with higher ISE adjusted their candy intake to that of a peer more closely than those with lower ISE when the confederate ate nothing compared to when eating a modest (β = .26, p = .05) or considerable amount of candy (kcal) (β = .32, p = .001).In contrast, participants with lower BE modeled peer intake more than those with higher BE when eating nothing compared to a considerable amount of candy (kcal) (β = .21, p = .02); ESE did not moderate social modeling behavior.In addition, participants with higher discrepant or "damaged" self-esteem (i.e., high ISE and low ESE) modeled peer intake more when the peer ate nothing or a modest amount compared to a substantial amount of candy (kcal) (β = -.24, p = .004; β = -.26, p<.0001, respectively).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This experimental study investigated the impact of peers on palatable food intake of youngsters within a social media setting. To determine whether this effect was moderated by self-esteem, the present study examined the roles of global explicit self-esteem (ESE), body esteem (BE) and implicit self-esteem (ISE).

Methods: Participants (N = 118; 38.1% boys; M age 11.14±.79) were asked to play a computer game while they believed to interact online with a same-sex normal-weight remote confederate (i.e., instructed peer) who ate either nothing, a small or large amount of candy.

Results: Participants modeled the candy intake of peers via a social media interaction, but this was qualified by their self-esteem. Participants with higher ISE adjusted their candy intake to that of a peer more closely than those with lower ISE when the confederate ate nothing compared to when eating a modest (β = .26, p = .05) or considerable amount of candy (kcal) (β = .32, p = .001). In contrast, participants with lower BE modeled peer intake more than those with higher BE when eating nothing compared to a considerable amount of candy (kcal) (β = .21, p = .02); ESE did not moderate social modeling behavior. In addition, participants with higher discrepant or "damaged" self-esteem (i.e., high ISE and low ESE) modeled peer intake more when the peer ate nothing or a modest amount compared to a substantial amount of candy (kcal) (β = -.24, p = .004; β = -.26, p<.0001, respectively).

Conclusion: Youngsters conform to the amount of palatable food eaten by peers through social media interaction. Those with lower body esteem or damaged self-esteem may be more at risk to peer influences on food intake.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus