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Chitin in the silk gland ducts of the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori.

Davies GJ, Knight DP, Vollrath F - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Here we report the detection and localisation of chitin in the cuticle of the spinning ducts of both the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori.Our observations demonstrate that the duct walls of both animals contain chitin notwithstanding totally independent evolutionary pathways of the systems.We conclude that chitin may well be an essential component for the construction of spinning ducts; we further conclude that in both species chitin may indicate the evolutionary origin of the spinning ducts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, The University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Here we report the detection and localisation of chitin in the cuticle of the spinning ducts of both the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori. Our observations demonstrate that the duct walls of both animals contain chitin notwithstanding totally independent evolutionary pathways of the systems. We conclude that chitin may well be an essential component for the construction of spinning ducts; we further conclude that in both species chitin may indicate the evolutionary origin of the spinning ducts.

Show MeSH
Original length of spider duct and portion testing positive for chitin plotted against cephalothorax width.Original length of duct (black squares), portion testing positive for chitin (red circles). Error bars show standard deviations of length measurements.
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pone-0073225-g002: Original length of spider duct and portion testing positive for chitin plotted against cephalothorax width.Original length of duct (black squares), portion testing positive for chitin (red circles). Error bars show standard deviations of length measurements.

Mentions: The length of the spider duct before the histochemical treatment was a linear function of cephalothorax width (p>0.01; R2 = 0.9141, n = 8). After the chitin test, the length of the remaining duct was also a linear function of cephalothorax width (p>0.01; R2 = 0.8759, n = 8) (Figure 2).


Chitin in the silk gland ducts of the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori.

Davies GJ, Knight DP, Vollrath F - PLoS ONE (2013)

Original length of spider duct and portion testing positive for chitin plotted against cephalothorax width.Original length of duct (black squares), portion testing positive for chitin (red circles). Error bars show standard deviations of length measurements.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3756001&req=5

pone-0073225-g002: Original length of spider duct and portion testing positive for chitin plotted against cephalothorax width.Original length of duct (black squares), portion testing positive for chitin (red circles). Error bars show standard deviations of length measurements.
Mentions: The length of the spider duct before the histochemical treatment was a linear function of cephalothorax width (p>0.01; R2 = 0.9141, n = 8). After the chitin test, the length of the remaining duct was also a linear function of cephalothorax width (p>0.01; R2 = 0.8759, n = 8) (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Here we report the detection and localisation of chitin in the cuticle of the spinning ducts of both the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori.Our observations demonstrate that the duct walls of both animals contain chitin notwithstanding totally independent evolutionary pathways of the systems.We conclude that chitin may well be an essential component for the construction of spinning ducts; we further conclude that in both species chitin may indicate the evolutionary origin of the spinning ducts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Zoology, The University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Here we report the detection and localisation of chitin in the cuticle of the spinning ducts of both the spider Nephila edulis and the silkworm Bombyx mori. Our observations demonstrate that the duct walls of both animals contain chitin notwithstanding totally independent evolutionary pathways of the systems. We conclude that chitin may well be an essential component for the construction of spinning ducts; we further conclude that in both species chitin may indicate the evolutionary origin of the spinning ducts.

Show MeSH