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Relationship between Water Content and Osmotic Potential of Lentinula edodes.

Koo CD, Cho SY - Mycobiology (2008)

Bottom Line: As the mushrooms mature, tissue water content maintained ca 94% in head tissues and ca 90% in gills, but significantly decreased from ca 90% to 82% in the stipe tissues.While osmotic potentials maintained -0.25 to -0.45 MPa in head and gill tissues, the potentials greatly decreased from -0.65 to -1.33MPa in stipe tissues.Our results show that osmotic potentials in L. edodes tissues are exponentially proportional to tissue water contents, that strains differ in osmotic potential related to water, and that stipe tissues can still have nutritional value when they mature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Forest Science, Chungbuk National University, Chungbuk 361-763, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was conducted to understand how osmotic potentials in Lentinula edodes tissues are related to water contents and how they change while a mushroom matures. Water content and osmotic potential of L. edodes mushroom tissues from log cultivation and sawdust cultivation were measured and the relationships were analyzed. Osmotic potentials in the tissues were exponentially proportional to their moisture contents and there were strain differences in the potentials. Strain 290 has lower osmotic potential than strain 302, in the tissues at the same water content. As the mushrooms mature, tissue water content maintained ca 94% in head tissues and ca 90% in gills, but significantly decreased from ca 90% to 82% in the stipe tissues. Osmotic potential changes were similar to the tissue water content changes as the mushrooms mature. While osmotic potentials maintained -0.25 to -0.45 MPa in head and gill tissues, the potentials greatly decreased from -0.65 to -1.33MPa in stipe tissues. Our results show that osmotic potentials in L. edodes tissues are exponentially proportional to tissue water contents, that strains differ in osmotic potential related to water, and that stipe tissues can still have nutritional value when they mature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between water content and osmotic potential in Lentinula edodes strain 290.
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Figure 2: Relationship between water content and osmotic potential in Lentinula edodes strain 290.

Mentions: Osmotic potentials in L. edodes tissues were exponentially proportional to water contents (Figs. 2 and 3). The relationships of two strains, 290 and 302 respectively, were not significantly different, but strain 302 had lower potential at the same water content than strain 290; that is, when water content in the mushroom tissue was 75 to 80% the osmotic potential was ca -1.0 to -0.65 MPa in strain 290 (Fig. 2), whereas it was ca -0.8 to -0.5MPa in strain 302 (Fig. 3). This difference becomes greater when water content decreases but becomes less when water content increases. When water content in the tissue was 95% the osmotic potential was ca -1.8 to -1.6MPa in both strains.


Relationship between Water Content and Osmotic Potential of Lentinula edodes.

Koo CD, Cho SY - Mycobiology (2008)

Relationship between water content and osmotic potential in Lentinula edodes strain 290.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3755247&req=5

Figure 2: Relationship between water content and osmotic potential in Lentinula edodes strain 290.
Mentions: Osmotic potentials in L. edodes tissues were exponentially proportional to water contents (Figs. 2 and 3). The relationships of two strains, 290 and 302 respectively, were not significantly different, but strain 302 had lower potential at the same water content than strain 290; that is, when water content in the mushroom tissue was 75 to 80% the osmotic potential was ca -1.0 to -0.65 MPa in strain 290 (Fig. 2), whereas it was ca -0.8 to -0.5MPa in strain 302 (Fig. 3). This difference becomes greater when water content decreases but becomes less when water content increases. When water content in the tissue was 95% the osmotic potential was ca -1.8 to -1.6MPa in both strains.

Bottom Line: As the mushrooms mature, tissue water content maintained ca 94% in head tissues and ca 90% in gills, but significantly decreased from ca 90% to 82% in the stipe tissues.While osmotic potentials maintained -0.25 to -0.45 MPa in head and gill tissues, the potentials greatly decreased from -0.65 to -1.33MPa in stipe tissues.Our results show that osmotic potentials in L. edodes tissues are exponentially proportional to tissue water contents, that strains differ in osmotic potential related to water, and that stipe tissues can still have nutritional value when they mature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Forest Science, Chungbuk National University, Chungbuk 361-763, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was conducted to understand how osmotic potentials in Lentinula edodes tissues are related to water contents and how they change while a mushroom matures. Water content and osmotic potential of L. edodes mushroom tissues from log cultivation and sawdust cultivation were measured and the relationships were analyzed. Osmotic potentials in the tissues were exponentially proportional to their moisture contents and there were strain differences in the potentials. Strain 290 has lower osmotic potential than strain 302, in the tissues at the same water content. As the mushrooms mature, tissue water content maintained ca 94% in head tissues and ca 90% in gills, but significantly decreased from ca 90% to 82% in the stipe tissues. Osmotic potential changes were similar to the tissue water content changes as the mushrooms mature. While osmotic potentials maintained -0.25 to -0.45 MPa in head and gill tissues, the potentials greatly decreased from -0.65 to -1.33MPa in stipe tissues. Our results show that osmotic potentials in L. edodes tissues are exponentially proportional to tissue water contents, that strains differ in osmotic potential related to water, and that stipe tissues can still have nutritional value when they mature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus