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Isolation of Bacteria Associated with the King Oyster Mushroom, Pleurotus eryngii.

Lim Y, Ryu JS, Shi S, Noh W, Kim E, Le QV, Lee HS, Ro HS - Mycobiology (2008)

Bottom Line: Among them, 4 bacterial isolates including LBS1, LBS4, LBS5, and LBS9 evidenced growth inhibitory activity on the mushroom mycelia.However, its cell-free supernatant was capable of inhibiting the formation of fruiting bodies.This indicates that LBS1 may produce an inhibitory heat-stable chemical compound which is readily degraded by its own secreted enzyme.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Deparment of Microbiology and Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwa-Dong, Chinju 660-701, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Eight distinct bacteria were isolated form diseased mycelia of the edible mushroom, Pleurotus eryngii. 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that the isolates belonged to a variety of bacterial genera including Bacillus (LBS5), Enterobacter (LBS1), Sphingomonas (LBS8 and LBS10), Staphylococcus (LBS3, LBS4 and LBS9) and Moraxella (LBS6). Among them, 4 bacterial isolates including LBS1, LBS4, LBS5, and LBS9 evidenced growth inhibitory activity on the mushroom mycelia. The inhibitory activity on the growth of the mushroom fruiting bodies was evaluated by the treatment of the bacterial culture broth or the heat-treated cell-free supernatant of the broth. The treatment of the culture broths or the cell-free supernatants of LBS4 or LBS9 completely inhibited the formation of the fruiting body, thereby suggesting that the inhibitory agent is a heat-stable compound. In the case of LBS5, only the bacterial cell-containing culture broth was capable of inhibiting the formation of the fruiting body, whereas the cell-free supernatant did not, which suggests that an inhibitory agent generated by LBS5 is a protein or a heat-labile chemical compound, potentially a fungal cell wall-degrading enzyme. The culture broth of LBS1 was not inhibitory. However, its cell-free supernatant was capable of inhibiting the formation of fruiting bodies. This indicates that LBS1 may produce an inhibitory heat-stable chemical compound which is readily degraded by its own secreted enzyme.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Isolation of bacteria from the diseased mycelia of P. eryngii. A) The mycelia propagated in the substrate bottle. B) Top view of the substrate bottle. The area included within the dotted line is the contaminated mycelia. C) Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence of the bacterial isolates. Gene bank accession numbers of the 16S rDNA sequences of the isolates are written in the parenthesis after the code name.
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Figure 1: Isolation of bacteria from the diseased mycelia of P. eryngii. A) The mycelia propagated in the substrate bottle. B) Top view of the substrate bottle. The area included within the dotted line is the contaminated mycelia. C) Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence of the bacterial isolates. Gene bank accession numbers of the 16S rDNA sequences of the isolates are written in the parenthesis after the code name.

Mentions: Full mycelial propagation within the substrate bottle requires at least 30 days under controlled environmental conditions, including humidity and temperature. During incubation, it has been frequently observed that parts of the mycelia assume a brownish color as the result of bacterial contamination (Fig. 1A and B). Once this occurs, the contaminated mycelia are not able to generate fruiting bodies, or they generate fruiting bodies with a significantly reduced half-life. In some farmland areas, more than 30% of the inoculated bottles are reportedly contaminated, and this results in a significant loss of mushroom productivity. In order to investigate the nature of the contamination, we attempted to isolate the contaminated bacteria from the diseased mycelia.


Isolation of Bacteria Associated with the King Oyster Mushroom, Pleurotus eryngii.

Lim Y, Ryu JS, Shi S, Noh W, Kim E, Le QV, Lee HS, Ro HS - Mycobiology (2008)

Isolation of bacteria from the diseased mycelia of P. eryngii. A) The mycelia propagated in the substrate bottle. B) Top view of the substrate bottle. The area included within the dotted line is the contaminated mycelia. C) Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence of the bacterial isolates. Gene bank accession numbers of the 16S rDNA sequences of the isolates are written in the parenthesis after the code name.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3755245&req=5

Figure 1: Isolation of bacteria from the diseased mycelia of P. eryngii. A) The mycelia propagated in the substrate bottle. B) Top view of the substrate bottle. The area included within the dotted line is the contaminated mycelia. C) Phylogenetic analysis on the basis of 16S rDNA sequence of the bacterial isolates. Gene bank accession numbers of the 16S rDNA sequences of the isolates are written in the parenthesis after the code name.
Mentions: Full mycelial propagation within the substrate bottle requires at least 30 days under controlled environmental conditions, including humidity and temperature. During incubation, it has been frequently observed that parts of the mycelia assume a brownish color as the result of bacterial contamination (Fig. 1A and B). Once this occurs, the contaminated mycelia are not able to generate fruiting bodies, or they generate fruiting bodies with a significantly reduced half-life. In some farmland areas, more than 30% of the inoculated bottles are reportedly contaminated, and this results in a significant loss of mushroom productivity. In order to investigate the nature of the contamination, we attempted to isolate the contaminated bacteria from the diseased mycelia.

Bottom Line: Among them, 4 bacterial isolates including LBS1, LBS4, LBS5, and LBS9 evidenced growth inhibitory activity on the mushroom mycelia.However, its cell-free supernatant was capable of inhibiting the formation of fruiting bodies.This indicates that LBS1 may produce an inhibitory heat-stable chemical compound which is readily degraded by its own secreted enzyme.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Deparment of Microbiology and Research Institute of Life Science, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gajwa-Dong, Chinju 660-701, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Eight distinct bacteria were isolated form diseased mycelia of the edible mushroom, Pleurotus eryngii. 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that the isolates belonged to a variety of bacterial genera including Bacillus (LBS5), Enterobacter (LBS1), Sphingomonas (LBS8 and LBS10), Staphylococcus (LBS3, LBS4 and LBS9) and Moraxella (LBS6). Among them, 4 bacterial isolates including LBS1, LBS4, LBS5, and LBS9 evidenced growth inhibitory activity on the mushroom mycelia. The inhibitory activity on the growth of the mushroom fruiting bodies was evaluated by the treatment of the bacterial culture broth or the heat-treated cell-free supernatant of the broth. The treatment of the culture broths or the cell-free supernatants of LBS4 or LBS9 completely inhibited the formation of the fruiting body, thereby suggesting that the inhibitory agent is a heat-stable compound. In the case of LBS5, only the bacterial cell-containing culture broth was capable of inhibiting the formation of the fruiting body, whereas the cell-free supernatant did not, which suggests that an inhibitory agent generated by LBS5 is a protein or a heat-labile chemical compound, potentially a fungal cell wall-degrading enzyme. The culture broth of LBS1 was not inhibitory. However, its cell-free supernatant was capable of inhibiting the formation of fruiting bodies. This indicates that LBS1 may produce an inhibitory heat-stable chemical compound which is readily degraded by its own secreted enzyme.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus