Limits...
Degradation of three aromatic dyes by white rot fungi and the production of ligninolytic enzymes.

Jayasinghe C, Imtiaj A, Lee GW, Im KH, Hur H, Lee MW, Yang HS, Lee TS - Mycobiology (2008)

Bottom Line: Therefore, they did not effectively decolorize malachite green on solid media.However, P. cinnabarinus and P. pulmonarius were able to effectively decolorize malachite green on solid media.P. coccineus, Coriolus versicolor and P. cinnabarinus were found to produce a large amount of laccase when grown in medium that contained napthalene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, University of Incheon, Incheon 402-749, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was conducted to evaluate the degradation of aromatic dyes and the production of ligninolytic enzymes by 10 white rot fungi. The results of this study revealed that Pycnoporus cinnabarinus, Pleurotus pulmonarius, Ganoderma lucidum, Trametes suaveolens, Stereum ostrea and Fomes fomentarius have the ability to efficiently degrade congo red on solid media. However, malachite green inhibited the mycelial growth of these organisms. Therefore, they did not effectively decolorize malachite green on solid media. However, P. cinnabarinus and P. pulmonarius were able to effectively decolorize malachite green on solid media. T. suaveolens and F. rosea decolorized methylene blue more effectively than any of the other fungi evaluated in this study. In liquid culture, G. lucidum, P. cinnabarinus, Naematoloma fasciculare and Pycnoporus coccineus were found to have a greater ability to decolorize congo red. In addition, P. cinnabarinus, G. lucidum and T. suaveolens decolorized methylene blue in liquid media more effectively than any of the other organisms evaluated in this study. Only F. fomentarius was able to decolorize malachite green in liquid media, and its ability to do so was limited. To investigate the production of ligninolytic enzymes in media containing aromatic compounds, fungi were cultured in naphthalene supplemented liquid media. P. coccineus, Coriolus versicolor and P. cinnabarinus were found to produce a large amount of laccase when grown in medium that contained napthalene.

No MeSH data available.


Production of laccase by white rot fungi in potato broth containing 1% of naphthalene and glucose. Results shown are the means of five replications. Vertical bars represent the standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3755234&req=5

Figure 2: Production of laccase by white rot fungi in potato broth containing 1% of naphthalene and glucose. Results shown are the means of five replications. Vertical bars represent the standard deviation.

Mentions: Fungal mycelia were grown in 20% potato broth supplemented with 1% glucose and 1% naphthalene and the laccase production was then determined based on an ABTS assay (Fig. 2). The largest amount of laccase (> 0.5 Uml-1) was secreted by P. cinnabarinus, C. versicolor and P. coccineus in media that contained naphthalene, whereas F. rosea and T. suaveolens only produced around 0.1 Uml-1 of laccase under the same conditions. All other species produced less than 0.1 Uml-1 of laccase in media that contained naphthalene. P. pulmonarius and N. fasciculare were found to produce more LiP in media that contained naphthalene (around 0.16 Uml-1) than the other species. However, F. rosea and T. suaveolens produced around 0.11 Uml-1 LiP and G. lucidum and F. fomentarius produced around 0.09 Uml-l LiP under the same conditions. All other species evaluated in this study produced less than 0.05 Uml-1 LiP in media that contained naphthalene (Fig. 3). C. versicolor produced the highest amount (0.27 Uml-1) of MnP in media that contained naphthalene, followed by F. fomentarius (0.16 Uml-1). The remainder of the species evaluated in this study produced less than 0.1 Uml-1 of MnP when they were cultured in media that contained naphthalene (Fig. 4). The secretion of laccase by P. cinnabarinus, C. versicolor and P. coccineus was greatly enhanced when they were cultured in media supplemented with naphthalene. Similarly, the production of LiP by P. pulmonarius, N. fasciculare, F. rosea and T. suaveolens was also enhanced in response to the addition of naphthalene the media. Furthermore, the production of MnP by C. versicolor was improved by the addition of naphthalene to the media. Production of ligninolytic enzymes is affected by many factors during fermentation, including the medium composition, carbon to nitrogen ratio, pH, temperature, and aeration rate. Moreover, many aromatic compounds have been widely used to stimulate the production of ligninolytic enzymes during fermentation (Arora and Gill, 2001; Mansur et al., 1997). Therefore, many studies have been conducted in an attempt to improve the production of ligninolytic enzymes by white rot fungi (Yesilada et al., 1991; Ardon et al., 1996; Kaluskar et al., 1999). The results of this study suggest that supplementation of the medium with a small amount of aromatic hydrocarbons can greatly enhance ligninolytic enzyme production and that fungi have the capability to degrade aromatic compounds efficiently.


Degradation of three aromatic dyes by white rot fungi and the production of ligninolytic enzymes.

Jayasinghe C, Imtiaj A, Lee GW, Im KH, Hur H, Lee MW, Yang HS, Lee TS - Mycobiology (2008)

Production of laccase by white rot fungi in potato broth containing 1% of naphthalene and glucose. Results shown are the means of five replications. Vertical bars represent the standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3755234&req=5

Figure 2: Production of laccase by white rot fungi in potato broth containing 1% of naphthalene and glucose. Results shown are the means of five replications. Vertical bars represent the standard deviation.
Mentions: Fungal mycelia were grown in 20% potato broth supplemented with 1% glucose and 1% naphthalene and the laccase production was then determined based on an ABTS assay (Fig. 2). The largest amount of laccase (> 0.5 Uml-1) was secreted by P. cinnabarinus, C. versicolor and P. coccineus in media that contained naphthalene, whereas F. rosea and T. suaveolens only produced around 0.1 Uml-1 of laccase under the same conditions. All other species produced less than 0.1 Uml-1 of laccase in media that contained naphthalene. P. pulmonarius and N. fasciculare were found to produce more LiP in media that contained naphthalene (around 0.16 Uml-1) than the other species. However, F. rosea and T. suaveolens produced around 0.11 Uml-1 LiP and G. lucidum and F. fomentarius produced around 0.09 Uml-l LiP under the same conditions. All other species evaluated in this study produced less than 0.05 Uml-1 LiP in media that contained naphthalene (Fig. 3). C. versicolor produced the highest amount (0.27 Uml-1) of MnP in media that contained naphthalene, followed by F. fomentarius (0.16 Uml-1). The remainder of the species evaluated in this study produced less than 0.1 Uml-1 of MnP when they were cultured in media that contained naphthalene (Fig. 4). The secretion of laccase by P. cinnabarinus, C. versicolor and P. coccineus was greatly enhanced when they were cultured in media supplemented with naphthalene. Similarly, the production of LiP by P. pulmonarius, N. fasciculare, F. rosea and T. suaveolens was also enhanced in response to the addition of naphthalene the media. Furthermore, the production of MnP by C. versicolor was improved by the addition of naphthalene to the media. Production of ligninolytic enzymes is affected by many factors during fermentation, including the medium composition, carbon to nitrogen ratio, pH, temperature, and aeration rate. Moreover, many aromatic compounds have been widely used to stimulate the production of ligninolytic enzymes during fermentation (Arora and Gill, 2001; Mansur et al., 1997). Therefore, many studies have been conducted in an attempt to improve the production of ligninolytic enzymes by white rot fungi (Yesilada et al., 1991; Ardon et al., 1996; Kaluskar et al., 1999). The results of this study suggest that supplementation of the medium with a small amount of aromatic hydrocarbons can greatly enhance ligninolytic enzyme production and that fungi have the capability to degrade aromatic compounds efficiently.

Bottom Line: Therefore, they did not effectively decolorize malachite green on solid media.However, P. cinnabarinus and P. pulmonarius were able to effectively decolorize malachite green on solid media.P. coccineus, Coriolus versicolor and P. cinnabarinus were found to produce a large amount of laccase when grown in medium that contained napthalene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, University of Incheon, Incheon 402-749, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was conducted to evaluate the degradation of aromatic dyes and the production of ligninolytic enzymes by 10 white rot fungi. The results of this study revealed that Pycnoporus cinnabarinus, Pleurotus pulmonarius, Ganoderma lucidum, Trametes suaveolens, Stereum ostrea and Fomes fomentarius have the ability to efficiently degrade congo red on solid media. However, malachite green inhibited the mycelial growth of these organisms. Therefore, they did not effectively decolorize malachite green on solid media. However, P. cinnabarinus and P. pulmonarius were able to effectively decolorize malachite green on solid media. T. suaveolens and F. rosea decolorized methylene blue more effectively than any of the other fungi evaluated in this study. In liquid culture, G. lucidum, P. cinnabarinus, Naematoloma fasciculare and Pycnoporus coccineus were found to have a greater ability to decolorize congo red. In addition, P. cinnabarinus, G. lucidum and T. suaveolens decolorized methylene blue in liquid media more effectively than any of the other organisms evaluated in this study. Only F. fomentarius was able to decolorize malachite green in liquid media, and its ability to do so was limited. To investigate the production of ligninolytic enzymes in media containing aromatic compounds, fungi were cultured in naphthalene supplemented liquid media. P. coccineus, Coriolus versicolor and P. cinnabarinus were found to produce a large amount of laccase when grown in medium that contained napthalene.

No MeSH data available.