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Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus.

Lee MW, Hur H, Chang KC, Lee TS, Ka KH, Jankovsky L - Mycobiology (2008)

Bottom Line: In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic.The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica.Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Science, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in Russia, Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe. Distribution at lower latitudes in Western and Southern Europe, Northern America, Asia, Japan, and Korea is rare. Infected trees grow for many years without several symptoms of decline. The infection can penetrate through stem injuries with exterior sterile conks developing later. In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic. The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica. Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Plantation area of birch and sterile conk development of Chaga. A, Location of birch stand area in peat bog site; B, Wetland of birch stand in peat bog; C, Infected tree by I. obliquus. The black conk is the mycelia mass of the fungus; D, Infested area visualized by cutting off the cinder conk. The scar of the infected portion is evident as a yellowish-brown color; E, The front view of a sterile conk cut off from a host plant. The yellowish-brown color is typical of the inside of a sterile conk; F, Side view of a sterile conk. Part of the yellowish-brown portion was attached to the host tree, and the black color is an out-growth produced during development of the sterile conk.
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Figure 1: Plantation area of birch and sterile conk development of Chaga. A, Location of birch stand area in peat bog site; B, Wetland of birch stand in peat bog; C, Infected tree by I. obliquus. The black conk is the mycelia mass of the fungus; D, Infested area visualized by cutting off the cinder conk. The scar of the infected portion is evident as a yellowish-brown color; E, The front view of a sterile conk cut off from a host plant. The yellowish-brown color is typical of the inside of a sterile conk; F, Side view of a sterile conk. Part of the yellowish-brown portion was attached to the host tree, and the black color is an out-growth produced during development of the sterile conk.

Mentions: In boreal forest ecosystems, the commonly involved tree is the birch (Betula spp.) and in meridional mountain forests the common tree is the beech (Fagus spp.) (Figs. 1A and 1B). I. obliquus cause a white heart rot. When the sterile conk is cut off from the host log or trunk, a yellowish-brown margin between fungal growth and the tree is typically evident (Fig. 1C). The blackish outer conk is not a fruiting body, but a dead fungal mass (Fig. 1D). The fungus penetrates the tree through wounds, especially through poorly healed branch stubs. Decay spreads throughout heartwood, but does not penetrate sapwood in the infection cycle that occurs in living trees, except for the portion around the sterile conk. Sapwood is colonized only in limited areas around basidiocarps on dead wood. Decay will continue for 10~80+ years inside a living host tree. Within infected living trees, the fungus produces only sterile cinder conks, 1~3 per stem.


Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus.

Lee MW, Hur H, Chang KC, Lee TS, Ka KH, Jankovsky L - Mycobiology (2008)

Plantation area of birch and sterile conk development of Chaga. A, Location of birch stand area in peat bog site; B, Wetland of birch stand in peat bog; C, Infected tree by I. obliquus. The black conk is the mycelia mass of the fungus; D, Infested area visualized by cutting off the cinder conk. The scar of the infected portion is evident as a yellowish-brown color; E, The front view of a sterile conk cut off from a host plant. The yellowish-brown color is typical of the inside of a sterile conk; F, Side view of a sterile conk. Part of the yellowish-brown portion was attached to the host tree, and the black color is an out-growth produced during development of the sterile conk.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3755195&req=5

Figure 1: Plantation area of birch and sterile conk development of Chaga. A, Location of birch stand area in peat bog site; B, Wetland of birch stand in peat bog; C, Infected tree by I. obliquus. The black conk is the mycelia mass of the fungus; D, Infested area visualized by cutting off the cinder conk. The scar of the infected portion is evident as a yellowish-brown color; E, The front view of a sterile conk cut off from a host plant. The yellowish-brown color is typical of the inside of a sterile conk; F, Side view of a sterile conk. Part of the yellowish-brown portion was attached to the host tree, and the black color is an out-growth produced during development of the sterile conk.
Mentions: In boreal forest ecosystems, the commonly involved tree is the birch (Betula spp.) and in meridional mountain forests the common tree is the beech (Fagus spp.) (Figs. 1A and 1B). I. obliquus cause a white heart rot. When the sterile conk is cut off from the host log or trunk, a yellowish-brown margin between fungal growth and the tree is typically evident (Fig. 1C). The blackish outer conk is not a fruiting body, but a dead fungal mass (Fig. 1D). The fungus penetrates the tree through wounds, especially through poorly healed branch stubs. Decay spreads throughout heartwood, but does not penetrate sapwood in the infection cycle that occurs in living trees, except for the portion around the sterile conk. Sapwood is colonized only in limited areas around basidiocarps on dead wood. Decay will continue for 10~80+ years inside a living host tree. Within infected living trees, the fungus produces only sterile cinder conks, 1~3 per stem.

Bottom Line: In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic.The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica.Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Science, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in Russia, Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe. Distribution at lower latitudes in Western and Southern Europe, Northern America, Asia, Japan, and Korea is rare. Infected trees grow for many years without several symptoms of decline. The infection can penetrate through stem injuries with exterior sterile conks developing later. In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic. The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica. Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus