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Fruitbody Development of Pleurotus ostreatus via Bottle Cultivation Using Recycled Substrate.

Jo WS, Kim JS, Cho DH, Park SD, Jung HY - Mycobiology (2008)

Bottom Line: Total nitrogen percentage was 0.76%, 1.13%, 1.16%, 1.36%, and 1.38% in the 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate, respectively; 0.95%, 1.04%, 1.34%, 1.36%, and 1.25% in the 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time postharvest substrate, respectively; and 0.72% and 0.68% in the 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate, respectively.Weight of the fresh fruiting body harvest was 115 g, 120 g, 117 g, 118 g, and 114 g on 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate, respectively; and 105 g and 45 g on 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate, respectively.The first mixed substrate (fresh) and recycled substrates generated no significant difference in the weight of fresh fruiting bodies harvested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Environment, Gyeongbuk Agricultural Technology Administration, Daegu 702-320, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was carried out to determine the possibility of bottle cultivation utilizing recycled oyster mushroom culture waste as a cultivating substrate for P. ostreatus. Total nitrogen percentage was 0.76%, 1.13%, 1.16%, 1.36%, and 1.38% in the 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate, respectively; 0.95%, 1.04%, 1.34%, 1.36%, and 1.25% in the 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time postharvest substrate, respectively; and 0.72% and 0.68% in the 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate, respectively. Weight of the fresh fruiting body harvest was 115 g, 120 g, 117 g, 118 g, and 114 g on 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate, respectively; and 105 g and 45 g on 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate, respectively. The first mixed substrate (fresh) and recycled substrates generated no significant difference in the weight of fresh fruiting bodies harvested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Primordium formation of P. ostreatus. A, 1st mixed; B, 3rd mixed (nonadditive); C, occurrence of P. ostreatus on waste substrate under wild conditions in May.
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Figure 1: Primordium formation of P. ostreatus. A, 1st mixed; B, 3rd mixed (nonadditive); C, occurrence of P. ostreatus on waste substrate under wild conditions in May.

Mentions: The current experiments were conducted to determine the possibility of artificial bottle culture using recycling substrates of P. ostreatus. The days for primordium formation were similar at 5~6 days on both mixed substrates and nonadditive substrates (Fig. 1). Furthermore, the days required for growing basidiocarps were similar at 4~5 days on both mixed substrates and nonadditive substrates. The weights of fresh fruiting body harvest on 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate were 115 g, 120 g, 117 g, 118 g, and 114 g, respectively; and 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate were 105 g and 45 g, respectively (Table 3, Fig. 2). Among these, the yields from different mixed substrates were similar, whereas the 3-time nonadditive substrate was the poorest. Chai (2000) reported that the second flush F. velutipes was tried utilizing the waste Populus mixed waste for commercial F. velutipes cultivation, indicating the potentiality of second crop and suggesting further research for it. This is in agreement with our experimental results. Using recycling substrates is economical because the first mixed substrate and recycling substrates show no substantial difference in the weight of fresh fruiting body harvested (Table 3).


Fruitbody Development of Pleurotus ostreatus via Bottle Cultivation Using Recycled Substrate.

Jo WS, Kim JS, Cho DH, Park SD, Jung HY - Mycobiology (2008)

Primordium formation of P. ostreatus. A, 1st mixed; B, 3rd mixed (nonadditive); C, occurrence of P. ostreatus on waste substrate under wild conditions in May.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3755186&req=5

Figure 1: Primordium formation of P. ostreatus. A, 1st mixed; B, 3rd mixed (nonadditive); C, occurrence of P. ostreatus on waste substrate under wild conditions in May.
Mentions: The current experiments were conducted to determine the possibility of artificial bottle culture using recycling substrates of P. ostreatus. The days for primordium formation were similar at 5~6 days on both mixed substrates and nonadditive substrates (Fig. 1). Furthermore, the days required for growing basidiocarps were similar at 4~5 days on both mixed substrates and nonadditive substrates. The weights of fresh fruiting body harvest on 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate were 115 g, 120 g, 117 g, 118 g, and 114 g, respectively; and 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate were 105 g and 45 g, respectively (Table 3, Fig. 2). Among these, the yields from different mixed substrates were similar, whereas the 3-time nonadditive substrate was the poorest. Chai (2000) reported that the second flush F. velutipes was tried utilizing the waste Populus mixed waste for commercial F. velutipes cultivation, indicating the potentiality of second crop and suggesting further research for it. This is in agreement with our experimental results. Using recycling substrates is economical because the first mixed substrate and recycling substrates show no substantial difference in the weight of fresh fruiting body harvested (Table 3).

Bottom Line: Total nitrogen percentage was 0.76%, 1.13%, 1.16%, 1.36%, and 1.38% in the 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate, respectively; 0.95%, 1.04%, 1.34%, 1.36%, and 1.25% in the 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time postharvest substrate, respectively; and 0.72% and 0.68% in the 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate, respectively.Weight of the fresh fruiting body harvest was 115 g, 120 g, 117 g, 118 g, and 114 g on 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate, respectively; and 105 g and 45 g on 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate, respectively.The first mixed substrate (fresh) and recycled substrates generated no significant difference in the weight of fresh fruiting bodies harvested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agricultural Environment, Gyeongbuk Agricultural Technology Administration, Daegu 702-320, Korea.

ABSTRACT
This study was carried out to determine the possibility of bottle cultivation utilizing recycled oyster mushroom culture waste as a cultivating substrate for P. ostreatus. Total nitrogen percentage was 0.76%, 1.13%, 1.16%, 1.36%, and 1.38% in the 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate, respectively; 0.95%, 1.04%, 1.34%, 1.36%, and 1.25% in the 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time postharvest substrate, respectively; and 0.72% and 0.68% in the 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate, respectively. Weight of the fresh fruiting body harvest was 115 g, 120 g, 117 g, 118 g, and 114 g on 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-time mixed substrate, respectively; and 105 g and 45 g on 2- and 3-time nonadditive substrate, respectively. The first mixed substrate (fresh) and recycled substrates generated no significant difference in the weight of fresh fruiting bodies harvested.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus