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Randomized controlled trial of a brief dyadic cognitive-behavioral intervention designed to prevent PTSD.

Brunet A, Des Groseilliers IB, Cordova MJ, Ruzek JI - Eur J Psychotraumatol (2013)

Bottom Line: In an intent-to-treat analysis, a time-by-group interaction was found, whereby the treated participants had less PTSD symptoms at the post-treatment but not at the pre-treatment compared to controls.Controlling for the improvement observed in the control participants, the intervention yielded a net effect size of d=0.39.A brief, early, and effective intervention can be provided by nurses or social workers in hospital settings, at a fairly low cost to individuals presenting to the emergency room as the result of trauma exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychosocial Research Division, Douglas Institute Research Center, Verdun, Québec, Canada ; Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a dearth of effective interventions to prevent the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Method: We evaluated the efficacy of a brief dyadic two-session cognitive-behavioral intervention through a controlled trial involving trauma-exposed individuals recruited at the hospital's emergency room. Participants were randomly assigned to either the dyadic intervention group (n=37) or to a waiting list (assessment only) group (n=37).

Results: In an intent-to-treat analysis, a time-by-group interaction was found, whereby the treated participants had less PTSD symptoms at the post-treatment but not at the pre-treatment compared to controls. Controlling for the improvement observed in the control participants, the intervention yielded a net effect size of d=0.39.

Conclusions: A brief, early, and effective intervention can be provided by nurses or social workers in hospital settings, at a fairly low cost to individuals presenting to the emergency room as the result of trauma exposure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Self-reported mean PTSD symptom scores across time for the two study groups according the IES-R.
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Figure 0002: Self-reported mean PTSD symptom scores across time for the two study groups according the IES-R.

Mentions: There was a statistically significant time-by-group interaction, F(2,72)=4.17, p=0.019. The contrasts analysis on the interaction term demonstrates that the PTSD symptom difference, as measured by the square-rooted IES-R, between the groups tend to increase with time (see Fig. 2 and Table 3) and achieved significance after the intervention treatment was completed, F(1,72)=4.44, p=0.039.


Randomized controlled trial of a brief dyadic cognitive-behavioral intervention designed to prevent PTSD.

Brunet A, Des Groseilliers IB, Cordova MJ, Ruzek JI - Eur J Psychotraumatol (2013)

Self-reported mean PTSD symptom scores across time for the two study groups according the IES-R.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3755180&req=5

Figure 0002: Self-reported mean PTSD symptom scores across time for the two study groups according the IES-R.
Mentions: There was a statistically significant time-by-group interaction, F(2,72)=4.17, p=0.019. The contrasts analysis on the interaction term demonstrates that the PTSD symptom difference, as measured by the square-rooted IES-R, between the groups tend to increase with time (see Fig. 2 and Table 3) and achieved significance after the intervention treatment was completed, F(1,72)=4.44, p=0.039.

Bottom Line: In an intent-to-treat analysis, a time-by-group interaction was found, whereby the treated participants had less PTSD symptoms at the post-treatment but not at the pre-treatment compared to controls.Controlling for the improvement observed in the control participants, the intervention yielded a net effect size of d=0.39.A brief, early, and effective intervention can be provided by nurses or social workers in hospital settings, at a fairly low cost to individuals presenting to the emergency room as the result of trauma exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychosocial Research Division, Douglas Institute Research Center, Verdun, Québec, Canada ; Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a dearth of effective interventions to prevent the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Method: We evaluated the efficacy of a brief dyadic two-session cognitive-behavioral intervention through a controlled trial involving trauma-exposed individuals recruited at the hospital's emergency room. Participants were randomly assigned to either the dyadic intervention group (n=37) or to a waiting list (assessment only) group (n=37).

Results: In an intent-to-treat analysis, a time-by-group interaction was found, whereby the treated participants had less PTSD symptoms at the post-treatment but not at the pre-treatment compared to controls. Controlling for the improvement observed in the control participants, the intervention yielded a net effect size of d=0.39.

Conclusions: A brief, early, and effective intervention can be provided by nurses or social workers in hospital settings, at a fairly low cost to individuals presenting to the emergency room as the result of trauma exposure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus