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Nutrigenomics approach elucidates health-promoting effects of high vegetable intake in lean and obese men.

Pasman WJ, van Erk MJ, Klöpping WA, Pellis L, Wopereis S, Bijlsma S, Hendriks HF, Kardinaal AF - Genes Nutr (2013)

Bottom Line: We aimed to explore whether vegetable consumption according to guidelines has beneficial health effects determined with classical biomarkers and nutrigenomics technologies.The high vegetable intake resulted in increased levels of plasma amino acid metabolites, decreased levels of 9-HODE and prostaglandin D3 and decreased levels of ASAT and ALP compared to low vegetable intake.By inclusion of sensitive omics technologies and comparing the changes induced by high vegetable intake with changes induced by energy restriction, it has been shown that part of vegetables' health benefits are mediated by changes in energy metabolism, inflammatory processes and oxidative stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: TNO, P.O. Box 360, 3700 AJ, Zeist, The Netherlands, wilrike.pasman@tno.nl.

ABSTRACT
We aimed to explore whether vegetable consumption according to guidelines has beneficial health effects determined with classical biomarkers and nutrigenomics technologies. Fifteen lean (age 36 ± 7 years; BMI 23.4 ± 1.7 kg m(-2)) and 17 obese (age 40 ± 6 years; BMI 30.3 ± 2.4 kg m(-2)) men consumed 50- or 200-g vegetables for 4 weeks in a randomized, crossover trial. Afterward, all subjects underwent 4 weeks of energy restriction (60 % of normal energy intake). Despite the limited weight loss of 1.7 ± 2.4 kg for the lean and 2.1 ± 1.9 kg for the obese due to energy restriction, beneficial health effects were found, including lower total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HbA1c concentrations. The high vegetable intake resulted in increased levels of plasma amino acid metabolites, decreased levels of 9-HODE and prostaglandin D3 and decreased levels of ASAT and ALP compared to low vegetable intake. Adipose tissue gene expression changes in response to vegetable intake were identified, and sets of selected genes were submitted to network analysis. The network of inflammation genes illustrated a central role for NFkB in (adipose tissue) modulation of inflammation by increased vegetable intake, in lean as well as obese subjects. In obese subjects, high vegetable intake also resulted in changes related to energy metabolism, adhesion and inflammation. By inclusion of sensitive omics technologies and comparing the changes induced by high vegetable intake with changes induced by energy restriction, it has been shown that part of vegetables' health benefits are mediated by changes in energy metabolism, inflammatory processes and oxidative stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Network showing biological links between genes involved in inflammation and plasma markers that respond to high vegetable intake in lean subjects. Red circle indicates up-regulation in response to high vegetable intake, blue circle indicates down-regulation in response to high vegetable intake. BAFF-R tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 13C; Bcl-3 B cell CLL/lymphoma 3; C3 complement component 3; CCL28 chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 28; CCR10 chemokine (C–C motif) receptor 10; CSF1 colony stimulating factor 1 (macrophage); Factor H complement factor H; IL-8: interleukin 8; MASP1: mannan-binding lectin serine peptidase 1 (C4/C2 activating component of Ra-reactive factor); NF-kB: nuclear factor-kappa-B; NFKBIB I-kappa-B-beta; PPAR-γ peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma; TNF-α tumor necrosis factor alpha; VISA mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein
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Fig2: Network showing biological links between genes involved in inflammation and plasma markers that respond to high vegetable intake in lean subjects. Red circle indicates up-regulation in response to high vegetable intake, blue circle indicates down-regulation in response to high vegetable intake. BAFF-R tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 13C; Bcl-3 B cell CLL/lymphoma 3; C3 complement component 3; CCL28 chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 28; CCR10 chemokine (C–C motif) receptor 10; CSF1 colony stimulating factor 1 (macrophage); Factor H complement factor H; IL-8: interleukin 8; MASP1: mannan-binding lectin serine peptidase 1 (C4/C2 activating component of Ra-reactive factor); NF-kB: nuclear factor-kappa-B; NFKBIB I-kappa-B-beta; PPAR-γ peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma; TNF-α tumor necrosis factor alpha; VISA mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein

Mentions: In lean subjects, high vegetable intake resulted in differential expression of 40 genes annotated to immune-related processes. The biological network in Fig. 2 shows direct interactions between 15 of these genes and plasma TNF-alpha, with transcription factor NFkB as a central regulator. Furthermore, network analysis showed that 9-HODE (measured in plasma) may be linked to this network through PPARγ. Potential anti-inflammatory effects of high vegetable intake in lean subjects are supported by down-regulation of NF-kB and target genes like tissue factor and IL-8 in adipose tissue as well as down-regulation of TNF-alpha levels in plasma.Fig. 2


Nutrigenomics approach elucidates health-promoting effects of high vegetable intake in lean and obese men.

Pasman WJ, van Erk MJ, Klöpping WA, Pellis L, Wopereis S, Bijlsma S, Hendriks HF, Kardinaal AF - Genes Nutr (2013)

Network showing biological links between genes involved in inflammation and plasma markers that respond to high vegetable intake in lean subjects. Red circle indicates up-regulation in response to high vegetable intake, blue circle indicates down-regulation in response to high vegetable intake. BAFF-R tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 13C; Bcl-3 B cell CLL/lymphoma 3; C3 complement component 3; CCL28 chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 28; CCR10 chemokine (C–C motif) receptor 10; CSF1 colony stimulating factor 1 (macrophage); Factor H complement factor H; IL-8: interleukin 8; MASP1: mannan-binding lectin serine peptidase 1 (C4/C2 activating component of Ra-reactive factor); NF-kB: nuclear factor-kappa-B; NFKBIB I-kappa-B-beta; PPAR-γ peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma; TNF-α tumor necrosis factor alpha; VISA mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig2: Network showing biological links between genes involved in inflammation and plasma markers that respond to high vegetable intake in lean subjects. Red circle indicates up-regulation in response to high vegetable intake, blue circle indicates down-regulation in response to high vegetable intake. BAFF-R tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 13C; Bcl-3 B cell CLL/lymphoma 3; C3 complement component 3; CCL28 chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 28; CCR10 chemokine (C–C motif) receptor 10; CSF1 colony stimulating factor 1 (macrophage); Factor H complement factor H; IL-8: interleukin 8; MASP1: mannan-binding lectin serine peptidase 1 (C4/C2 activating component of Ra-reactive factor); NF-kB: nuclear factor-kappa-B; NFKBIB I-kappa-B-beta; PPAR-γ peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma; TNF-α tumor necrosis factor alpha; VISA mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein
Mentions: In lean subjects, high vegetable intake resulted in differential expression of 40 genes annotated to immune-related processes. The biological network in Fig. 2 shows direct interactions between 15 of these genes and plasma TNF-alpha, with transcription factor NFkB as a central regulator. Furthermore, network analysis showed that 9-HODE (measured in plasma) may be linked to this network through PPARγ. Potential anti-inflammatory effects of high vegetable intake in lean subjects are supported by down-regulation of NF-kB and target genes like tissue factor and IL-8 in adipose tissue as well as down-regulation of TNF-alpha levels in plasma.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: We aimed to explore whether vegetable consumption according to guidelines has beneficial health effects determined with classical biomarkers and nutrigenomics technologies.The high vegetable intake resulted in increased levels of plasma amino acid metabolites, decreased levels of 9-HODE and prostaglandin D3 and decreased levels of ASAT and ALP compared to low vegetable intake.By inclusion of sensitive omics technologies and comparing the changes induced by high vegetable intake with changes induced by energy restriction, it has been shown that part of vegetables' health benefits are mediated by changes in energy metabolism, inflammatory processes and oxidative stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: TNO, P.O. Box 360, 3700 AJ, Zeist, The Netherlands, wilrike.pasman@tno.nl.

ABSTRACT
We aimed to explore whether vegetable consumption according to guidelines has beneficial health effects determined with classical biomarkers and nutrigenomics technologies. Fifteen lean (age 36 ± 7 years; BMI 23.4 ± 1.7 kg m(-2)) and 17 obese (age 40 ± 6 years; BMI 30.3 ± 2.4 kg m(-2)) men consumed 50- or 200-g vegetables for 4 weeks in a randomized, crossover trial. Afterward, all subjects underwent 4 weeks of energy restriction (60 % of normal energy intake). Despite the limited weight loss of 1.7 ± 2.4 kg for the lean and 2.1 ± 1.9 kg for the obese due to energy restriction, beneficial health effects were found, including lower total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and HbA1c concentrations. The high vegetable intake resulted in increased levels of plasma amino acid metabolites, decreased levels of 9-HODE and prostaglandin D3 and decreased levels of ASAT and ALP compared to low vegetable intake. Adipose tissue gene expression changes in response to vegetable intake were identified, and sets of selected genes were submitted to network analysis. The network of inflammation genes illustrated a central role for NFkB in (adipose tissue) modulation of inflammation by increased vegetable intake, in lean as well as obese subjects. In obese subjects, high vegetable intake also resulted in changes related to energy metabolism, adhesion and inflammation. By inclusion of sensitive omics technologies and comparing the changes induced by high vegetable intake with changes induced by energy restriction, it has been shown that part of vegetables' health benefits are mediated by changes in energy metabolism, inflammatory processes and oxidative stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus