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Growing poplars for research with and without mycorrhizas.

Müller A, Volmer K, Mishra-Knyrim M, Polle A - Front Plant Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: The basis of these investigations is the reproducible production of homogeneous plant material.Maintenance and plant preparation require different multiplication and rooting media.Growth and vitality of the trees in vitro and outdoors with and without ectomycorrhizas are reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, Büsgen-Institut, Georg-August Universität Göttingen Göttingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
During the last decades the importance of the genus Populus increased because the poplar genome has been sequenced and molecular tools for basic research have become available. Poplar species occur in different habitats and harbor large genetic variation, which can be exploited for economic applications and for increasing our knowledge on the basic molecular mechanisms of the woody life style. Poplars are, therefore, employed to unravel the molecular mechanisms of wood formation, stress tolerance, tree nutrition and interaction with other organisms such as pathogens or mycorrhiza. The basis of these investigations is the reproducible production of homogeneous plant material. In this method paper we describe techniques and growth conditions for the in vitro propagation of different poplar species (Populus × canescens, P. trichocarpa, P. tremula, and P. euphratica) and ectomycorrhizal fungi (Laccaria bicolor, Paxillus involutus) as well as for their co-cultivation for ectomycorrhizal synthesis. Maintenance and plant preparation require different multiplication and rooting media. Growth systems to cultivate poplars under axenic conditions in agar and sand cultures with and without mycorrhizal fungi are described. Transfer of the plants from in vitro to in situ conditions is critical and hardening is important to prevent high mortality. Growth and vitality of the trees in vitro and outdoors with and without ectomycorrhizas are reported.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Populus × canescens plant grown outdoors (A), height development during the growth phase of 54 days (B), and long-term growth in soil filled boxes (C). The potted poplars were grown in 3l pots from the day of planting to day 54 (mean ± SE, n = 16).
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Figure 4: Populus × canescens plant grown outdoors (A), height development during the growth phase of 54 days (B), and long-term growth in soil filled boxes (C). The potted poplars were grown in 3l pots from the day of planting to day 54 (mean ± SE, n = 16).

Mentions: In our studies Populus × canescens was grown for 2 months in 3l pots in Frühstorfer Erde Typ N under outdoor conditions (Figure 4). The potted plants were gradually acclimated to outdoor conditions by gradually increasing the exposure times outdoors and initially avoiding full sun. After 54 days, the plants reached the height of about 1 m (Figure 4), an aboveground biomass of 14 g and a belowground biomass of 4 g. If the plants are intended to be grown for longer time periods, pots with larger volumes, or use of large boxes are recommended (Figure 4). Selecting the correct pot size is a trade-off between a higher number of replicates (small pots) and a longer duration of the study (large pots or boxes). In the large boxes, we maintained poplars for up to 2 years and heights up to 2.5–3 m (Figure 4). With a governmental permission, growth of transgenic poplars under outdoor conditions is possible (e.g., Behnke et al., 2010, 2012). Field trials with transgenic poplars have also been reported (Walter et al., 2010; Danielsen et al., 2012). However, because of the strict regulation in many countries, such field trials are not common (Strauss et al., 2009).


Growing poplars for research with and without mycorrhizas.

Müller A, Volmer K, Mishra-Knyrim M, Polle A - Front Plant Sci (2013)

Populus × canescens plant grown outdoors (A), height development during the growth phase of 54 days (B), and long-term growth in soil filled boxes (C). The potted poplars were grown in 3l pots from the day of planting to day 54 (mean ± SE, n = 16).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3753594&req=5

Figure 4: Populus × canescens plant grown outdoors (A), height development during the growth phase of 54 days (B), and long-term growth in soil filled boxes (C). The potted poplars were grown in 3l pots from the day of planting to day 54 (mean ± SE, n = 16).
Mentions: In our studies Populus × canescens was grown for 2 months in 3l pots in Frühstorfer Erde Typ N under outdoor conditions (Figure 4). The potted plants were gradually acclimated to outdoor conditions by gradually increasing the exposure times outdoors and initially avoiding full sun. After 54 days, the plants reached the height of about 1 m (Figure 4), an aboveground biomass of 14 g and a belowground biomass of 4 g. If the plants are intended to be grown for longer time periods, pots with larger volumes, or use of large boxes are recommended (Figure 4). Selecting the correct pot size is a trade-off between a higher number of replicates (small pots) and a longer duration of the study (large pots or boxes). In the large boxes, we maintained poplars for up to 2 years and heights up to 2.5–3 m (Figure 4). With a governmental permission, growth of transgenic poplars under outdoor conditions is possible (e.g., Behnke et al., 2010, 2012). Field trials with transgenic poplars have also been reported (Walter et al., 2010; Danielsen et al., 2012). However, because of the strict regulation in many countries, such field trials are not common (Strauss et al., 2009).

Bottom Line: The basis of these investigations is the reproducible production of homogeneous plant material.Maintenance and plant preparation require different multiplication and rooting media.Growth and vitality of the trees in vitro and outdoors with and without ectomycorrhizas are reported.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Forest Botany and Tree Physiology, Büsgen-Institut, Georg-August Universität Göttingen Göttingen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
During the last decades the importance of the genus Populus increased because the poplar genome has been sequenced and molecular tools for basic research have become available. Poplar species occur in different habitats and harbor large genetic variation, which can be exploited for economic applications and for increasing our knowledge on the basic molecular mechanisms of the woody life style. Poplars are, therefore, employed to unravel the molecular mechanisms of wood formation, stress tolerance, tree nutrition and interaction with other organisms such as pathogens or mycorrhiza. The basis of these investigations is the reproducible production of homogeneous plant material. In this method paper we describe techniques and growth conditions for the in vitro propagation of different poplar species (Populus × canescens, P. trichocarpa, P. tremula, and P. euphratica) and ectomycorrhizal fungi (Laccaria bicolor, Paxillus involutus) as well as for their co-cultivation for ectomycorrhizal synthesis. Maintenance and plant preparation require different multiplication and rooting media. Growth systems to cultivate poplars under axenic conditions in agar and sand cultures with and without mycorrhizal fungi are described. Transfer of the plants from in vitro to in situ conditions is critical and hardening is important to prevent high mortality. Growth and vitality of the trees in vitro and outdoors with and without ectomycorrhizas are reported.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus