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Global interference during early visual processing: ERP evidence from a rapid global/local selective task.

Beaucousin V, Simon G, Cassotti M, Pineau A, Houdé O, Poirel N - Front Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: Together, these effects are called the global precedence effect (GPE).Even if the global advantage appears to impact neural processing as early as the first 100 ms post-stimulus, previous studies failed to find a global interference effect before 200 ms post-stimulus.In particular, only congruent stimuli elicited similar N1 amplitude during the global and local tasks, whereas an increased of the N1 amplitude during the global task was observed (as compared to the local task) for both stimuli with perceptual conflict and incongruent stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Psychopathologie et Neuropsychologie, EA 2027, Université Paris 8 Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
Visual perception depends on the integration of local elements of a visual scene into a global frame. Evidence from behavioral studies shows that (1) the detection of the global frame is faster than the detection of the local parts, a phenomenon called the global advantage, and that (2) an interference of the global shape is also present during local processing. Together, these effects are called the global precedence effect (GPE). Even if the global advantage appears to impact neural processing as early as the first 100 ms post-stimulus, previous studies failed to find a global interference effect before 200 ms post-stimulus. Using for the first time a rapid display of letter component stimuli during a global/local selective task in which conditions with perceptual conflict, congruent and incongruent conditions were considered, the present event-related potential (ERP) study shows a global interference effect occurring as early as the time range of the N1 component. In particular, only congruent stimuli elicited similar N1 amplitude during the global and local tasks, whereas an increased of the N1 amplitude during the global task was observed (as compared to the local task) for both stimuli with perceptual conflict and incongruent stimuli. This finding corroborates the recent neural models of human visual perception.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of stimuli.
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Figure 1: Examples of stimuli.

Mentions: The compound stimuli consisted of a global letter always made up of 40 small local identical letters (Figure 1; see Poirel et al., 2008). Each of the small letters fit in virtual rectangles of 1.26 × 0.92° (height × width), while the virtual rectangle for the global letter subtends 8.5 × 11.4° of visual angle. The compound stimuli were based on combinations of “A” (non-target letter), “H” and “S” (target letters).


Global interference during early visual processing: ERP evidence from a rapid global/local selective task.

Beaucousin V, Simon G, Cassotti M, Pineau A, Houdé O, Poirel N - Front Psychol (2013)

Examples of stimuli.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3753554&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of stimuli.
Mentions: The compound stimuli consisted of a global letter always made up of 40 small local identical letters (Figure 1; see Poirel et al., 2008). Each of the small letters fit in virtual rectangles of 1.26 × 0.92° (height × width), while the virtual rectangle for the global letter subtends 8.5 × 11.4° of visual angle. The compound stimuli were based on combinations of “A” (non-target letter), “H” and “S” (target letters).

Bottom Line: Together, these effects are called the global precedence effect (GPE).Even if the global advantage appears to impact neural processing as early as the first 100 ms post-stimulus, previous studies failed to find a global interference effect before 200 ms post-stimulus.In particular, only congruent stimuli elicited similar N1 amplitude during the global and local tasks, whereas an increased of the N1 amplitude during the global task was observed (as compared to the local task) for both stimuli with perceptual conflict and incongruent stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Psychopathologie et Neuropsychologie, EA 2027, Université Paris 8 Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
Visual perception depends on the integration of local elements of a visual scene into a global frame. Evidence from behavioral studies shows that (1) the detection of the global frame is faster than the detection of the local parts, a phenomenon called the global advantage, and that (2) an interference of the global shape is also present during local processing. Together, these effects are called the global precedence effect (GPE). Even if the global advantage appears to impact neural processing as early as the first 100 ms post-stimulus, previous studies failed to find a global interference effect before 200 ms post-stimulus. Using for the first time a rapid display of letter component stimuli during a global/local selective task in which conditions with perceptual conflict, congruent and incongruent conditions were considered, the present event-related potential (ERP) study shows a global interference effect occurring as early as the time range of the N1 component. In particular, only congruent stimuli elicited similar N1 amplitude during the global and local tasks, whereas an increased of the N1 amplitude during the global task was observed (as compared to the local task) for both stimuli with perceptual conflict and incongruent stimuli. This finding corroborates the recent neural models of human visual perception.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus