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Trends in ischaemic heart disease hospitalisation and case fatality in the Hong Kong Chinese population 2000-2009: a secondary analysis.

Chau PH, Wong M, Woo J - BMJ Open (2013)

Bottom Line: Overall, the short-term/long-term case fatality rates were unchanged over time for both sexes.Hong Kong trends resembled those in the USA, England and Wales, showing stable or slow decline in the IHD rates, while increasing trends were observed for some age groups, particularly young adults.Public health promotion efforts should focus on reducing cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension prevalence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study examines the recent trends in ischaemic heart disease (IHD) incidence and case fatality in Hong Kong and explores the possible risk factors.

Design: Retrospective observational study.

Setting: All public hospitals in Hong Kong.

Outcome measures: Incidence rate was defined as the number of IHD inpatient episodes divided by the size of the corresponding population. Short-term and long-term case fatality rate was defined as deaths from all causes occurring within 30 and 31-365 days, respectively, divided by the number of IHD inpatient episodes among the corresponding population.

Methods: Poisson and logistic regression models were used to examine the IHD incidence and short-term/long-term case fatality trends, respectively, for different age and sex groups.

Results: IHD incidence was stable in most age groups. However, the incidence in men aged 15-24, 35-44 and ≥85 years showed increasing trends, whereas the incidence in men aged 55-64 years and women aged 35-74 years showed decreasing trends. Overall, the short-term/long-term case fatality rates were unchanged over time for both sexes. Short-term case fatality showed increasing trends in women aged 65-74 and ≥85 years, while long-term case fatality in men aged 55-64 and 75-84 years and women aged ≥75 years showed increasing trends.

Conclusions: Hong Kong trends resembled those in the USA, England and Wales, showing stable or slow decline in the IHD rates, while increasing trends were observed for some age groups, particularly young adults. Public health promotion efforts should focus on reducing cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension prevalence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A and B) Age-sex-specific short-term ischaemic heart disease (IHD) case fatality rates among the population aged ≥15 years in Hong Kong for 2000–2009.
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BMJOPEN2013002963F2: (A and B) Age-sex-specific short-term ischaemic heart disease (IHD) case fatality rates among the population aged ≥15 years in Hong Kong for 2000–2009.

Mentions: The age-standardised short-term case fatality rates remained stable for men and women. In 2009, the age-standardised short-term case fatality rates for men and women aged ≥15 years were 7% and 10.8%, respectively (table 2). Figure 2 shows the age-specific and sex-specific short-term case fatality rates for IHD. Logistic regression analysis (table 3) showed that the short-term IHD case fatality rate for men aged 55–64 years decreased significantly by 2.7% per year (95% CI 0.3% to 5.1%) while remaining stable for other age groups. For women, the rates increased significantly by 2.9% per year (95% CI 0.8% to 5.0%) for those aged 65–74 years and by 3.4% per year (95% CI 1.9% to 4.8%) for those aged ≥85 years, in the context of the overall stable trend.


Trends in ischaemic heart disease hospitalisation and case fatality in the Hong Kong Chinese population 2000-2009: a secondary analysis.

Chau PH, Wong M, Woo J - BMJ Open (2013)

(A and B) Age-sex-specific short-term ischaemic heart disease (IHD) case fatality rates among the population aged ≥15 years in Hong Kong for 2000–2009.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3753521&req=5

BMJOPEN2013002963F2: (A and B) Age-sex-specific short-term ischaemic heart disease (IHD) case fatality rates among the population aged ≥15 years in Hong Kong for 2000–2009.
Mentions: The age-standardised short-term case fatality rates remained stable for men and women. In 2009, the age-standardised short-term case fatality rates for men and women aged ≥15 years were 7% and 10.8%, respectively (table 2). Figure 2 shows the age-specific and sex-specific short-term case fatality rates for IHD. Logistic regression analysis (table 3) showed that the short-term IHD case fatality rate for men aged 55–64 years decreased significantly by 2.7% per year (95% CI 0.3% to 5.1%) while remaining stable for other age groups. For women, the rates increased significantly by 2.9% per year (95% CI 0.8% to 5.0%) for those aged 65–74 years and by 3.4% per year (95% CI 1.9% to 4.8%) for those aged ≥85 years, in the context of the overall stable trend.

Bottom Line: Overall, the short-term/long-term case fatality rates were unchanged over time for both sexes.Hong Kong trends resembled those in the USA, England and Wales, showing stable or slow decline in the IHD rates, while increasing trends were observed for some age groups, particularly young adults.Public health promotion efforts should focus on reducing cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension prevalence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study examines the recent trends in ischaemic heart disease (IHD) incidence and case fatality in Hong Kong and explores the possible risk factors.

Design: Retrospective observational study.

Setting: All public hospitals in Hong Kong.

Outcome measures: Incidence rate was defined as the number of IHD inpatient episodes divided by the size of the corresponding population. Short-term and long-term case fatality rate was defined as deaths from all causes occurring within 30 and 31-365 days, respectively, divided by the number of IHD inpatient episodes among the corresponding population.

Methods: Poisson and logistic regression models were used to examine the IHD incidence and short-term/long-term case fatality trends, respectively, for different age and sex groups.

Results: IHD incidence was stable in most age groups. However, the incidence in men aged 15-24, 35-44 and ≥85 years showed increasing trends, whereas the incidence in men aged 55-64 years and women aged 35-74 years showed decreasing trends. Overall, the short-term/long-term case fatality rates were unchanged over time for both sexes. Short-term case fatality showed increasing trends in women aged 65-74 and ≥85 years, while long-term case fatality in men aged 55-64 and 75-84 years and women aged ≥75 years showed increasing trends.

Conclusions: Hong Kong trends resembled those in the USA, England and Wales, showing stable or slow decline in the IHD rates, while increasing trends were observed for some age groups, particularly young adults. Public health promotion efforts should focus on reducing cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension prevalence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus