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Behavioral and neural plasticity caused by early social experiences: the case of the honeybee.

Arenas A, Ramírez GP, Balbuena MS, Farina WM - Front Physiol (2013)

Bottom Line: Early olfactory experiences lead to stable and long-term associative memories that can be successfully recalled after many days, even at foraging ages.Early rewarded experiences have relevant consequences at the social level too, biasing dance and trophallaxis partner choice and affecting recruitment.Here, we revised recent results in bees' physiology, behavior, and sociobiology to depict how the early experiences affect their cognition abilities and neural-related circuits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Grupo de Estudio de Insectos Sociales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Universidad de Buenos Aires Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT
Cognitive experiences during the early stages of life play an important role in shaping future behavior. Behavioral and neural long-term changes after early sensory and associative experiences have been recently reported in the honeybee. This invertebrate is an excellent model for assessing the role of precocious experiences on later behavior due to its extraordinarily tuned division of labor based on age polyethism. These studies are mainly focused on the role and importance of experiences occurred during the first days of the adult lifespan, their impact on foraging decisions, and their contribution to coordinate food gathering. Odor-rewarded experiences during the first days of honeybee adulthood alter the responsiveness to sucrose, making young hive bees more sensitive to assess gustatory features about the nectar brought back to the hive and affecting the dynamic of the food transfers and the propagation of food-related information within the colony. Early olfactory experiences lead to stable and long-term associative memories that can be successfully recalled after many days, even at foraging ages. Also they improve memorizing of new associative learning events later in life. The establishment of early memories promotes stable reorganization of the olfactory circuits inducing structural and functional changes in the antennal lobe (AL). Early rewarded experiences have relevant consequences at the social level too, biasing dance and trophallaxis partner choice and affecting recruitment. Here, we revised recent results in bees' physiology, behavior, and sociobiology to depict how the early experiences affect their cognition abilities and neural-related circuits.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Morphological and functional glomerular plasticity in 15 identified glomeruli of the honeybee antennal lobe (AL). (A) Schematic representation of the honeybee antennal lobe (AL) showing the 15 identified glomeruli of the AL labeled with their numbers. (B) Glomerular maps of calcium activity in response to 1-Nonanol in 17-day-old control bees (left) and in T5–8 bees (right), that were offered scented food 5–8 days after emergence. (C) Change in odor-evoked activity after early olfactory experience (left) and volume change obtained between control and experienced bees (right). Response intensity and volume changes were categorized in five equal bins from 0 to 100% or –100 to 100% respect (see Galizia et al., 1999; Hourcade et al., 2009). (D) Structural and functional changes were positively correlated after a glomerulus-wise Pearson correlation (r = 0.52, P = 0.045, df = 13). (After Arenas et al. 2012. With permission).
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Figure 3: Morphological and functional glomerular plasticity in 15 identified glomeruli of the honeybee antennal lobe (AL). (A) Schematic representation of the honeybee antennal lobe (AL) showing the 15 identified glomeruli of the AL labeled with their numbers. (B) Glomerular maps of calcium activity in response to 1-Nonanol in 17-day-old control bees (left) and in T5–8 bees (right), that were offered scented food 5–8 days after emergence. (C) Change in odor-evoked activity after early olfactory experience (left) and volume change obtained between control and experienced bees (right). Response intensity and volume changes were categorized in five equal bins from 0 to 100% or –100 to 100% respect (see Galizia et al., 1999; Hourcade et al., 2009). (D) Structural and functional changes were positively correlated after a glomerulus-wise Pearson correlation (r = 0.52, P = 0.045, df = 13). (After Arenas et al. 2012. With permission).

Mentions: The AL (Figure 3) is the primary integrative center of odor information in the insect olfactory system. It is constituted of spherical subunits, the glomeruli, where olfactory receptor neurons from the antennae synapse with local interneurons and second-order neurons connecting with multimodal processing centers such as the mushroom bodies. Odors sensed by olfactory receptors are coded in the AL by patterns of glomerular activity (Friedrich and Korsching, 1997; Joerges et al., 1997; Galizia et al., 1998, 1999; Rubin and Katz, 1999; Sachse et al., 1999; Uchida et al., 2000; Carlsson et al., 2002; Sachse and Galizia, 2002). The arrangement and number of glomeruli that result activated by a particular odor is very well-conserved across adult honeybees; however, this neural code is dynamic and activity patterns can result modified by experience with odors (Faber et al., 1999; Sandoz et al., 2003; Rath et al., 2011).


Behavioral and neural plasticity caused by early social experiences: the case of the honeybee.

Arenas A, Ramírez GP, Balbuena MS, Farina WM - Front Physiol (2013)

Morphological and functional glomerular plasticity in 15 identified glomeruli of the honeybee antennal lobe (AL). (A) Schematic representation of the honeybee antennal lobe (AL) showing the 15 identified glomeruli of the AL labeled with their numbers. (B) Glomerular maps of calcium activity in response to 1-Nonanol in 17-day-old control bees (left) and in T5–8 bees (right), that were offered scented food 5–8 days after emergence. (C) Change in odor-evoked activity after early olfactory experience (left) and volume change obtained between control and experienced bees (right). Response intensity and volume changes were categorized in five equal bins from 0 to 100% or –100 to 100% respect (see Galizia et al., 1999; Hourcade et al., 2009). (D) Structural and functional changes were positively correlated after a glomerulus-wise Pearson correlation (r = 0.52, P = 0.045, df = 13). (After Arenas et al. 2012. With permission).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750948&req=5

Figure 3: Morphological and functional glomerular plasticity in 15 identified glomeruli of the honeybee antennal lobe (AL). (A) Schematic representation of the honeybee antennal lobe (AL) showing the 15 identified glomeruli of the AL labeled with their numbers. (B) Glomerular maps of calcium activity in response to 1-Nonanol in 17-day-old control bees (left) and in T5–8 bees (right), that were offered scented food 5–8 days after emergence. (C) Change in odor-evoked activity after early olfactory experience (left) and volume change obtained between control and experienced bees (right). Response intensity and volume changes were categorized in five equal bins from 0 to 100% or –100 to 100% respect (see Galizia et al., 1999; Hourcade et al., 2009). (D) Structural and functional changes were positively correlated after a glomerulus-wise Pearson correlation (r = 0.52, P = 0.045, df = 13). (After Arenas et al. 2012. With permission).
Mentions: The AL (Figure 3) is the primary integrative center of odor information in the insect olfactory system. It is constituted of spherical subunits, the glomeruli, where olfactory receptor neurons from the antennae synapse with local interneurons and second-order neurons connecting with multimodal processing centers such as the mushroom bodies. Odors sensed by olfactory receptors are coded in the AL by patterns of glomerular activity (Friedrich and Korsching, 1997; Joerges et al., 1997; Galizia et al., 1998, 1999; Rubin and Katz, 1999; Sachse et al., 1999; Uchida et al., 2000; Carlsson et al., 2002; Sachse and Galizia, 2002). The arrangement and number of glomeruli that result activated by a particular odor is very well-conserved across adult honeybees; however, this neural code is dynamic and activity patterns can result modified by experience with odors (Faber et al., 1999; Sandoz et al., 2003; Rath et al., 2011).

Bottom Line: Early olfactory experiences lead to stable and long-term associative memories that can be successfully recalled after many days, even at foraging ages.Early rewarded experiences have relevant consequences at the social level too, biasing dance and trophallaxis partner choice and affecting recruitment.Here, we revised recent results in bees' physiology, behavior, and sociobiology to depict how the early experiences affect their cognition abilities and neural-related circuits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Grupo de Estudio de Insectos Sociales, Departamento de Biodiversidad y Biología Experimental, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, IFIBYNE-CONICET, Universidad de Buenos Aires Buenos Aires, Argentina.

ABSTRACT
Cognitive experiences during the early stages of life play an important role in shaping future behavior. Behavioral and neural long-term changes after early sensory and associative experiences have been recently reported in the honeybee. This invertebrate is an excellent model for assessing the role of precocious experiences on later behavior due to its extraordinarily tuned division of labor based on age polyethism. These studies are mainly focused on the role and importance of experiences occurred during the first days of the adult lifespan, their impact on foraging decisions, and their contribution to coordinate food gathering. Odor-rewarded experiences during the first days of honeybee adulthood alter the responsiveness to sucrose, making young hive bees more sensitive to assess gustatory features about the nectar brought back to the hive and affecting the dynamic of the food transfers and the propagation of food-related information within the colony. Early olfactory experiences lead to stable and long-term associative memories that can be successfully recalled after many days, even at foraging ages. Also they improve memorizing of new associative learning events later in life. The establishment of early memories promotes stable reorganization of the olfactory circuits inducing structural and functional changes in the antennal lobe (AL). Early rewarded experiences have relevant consequences at the social level too, biasing dance and trophallaxis partner choice and affecting recruitment. Here, we revised recent results in bees' physiology, behavior, and sociobiology to depict how the early experiences affect their cognition abilities and neural-related circuits.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus