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Epidermoid carcinoma of the skin mimicking breast cancer.

Melo Neto B, Oliveira Gda P, Vieira SC, Leal LR, Melo Junior JA, Vieira CF - An Bras Dermatol (2013 Mar-Apr)

Bottom Line: Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most frequent cancer in the world.Squamous cell cancer often occurs in sun-exposed areas, such as the head and neck.Confirmation by means of histopathological examination, combined with clinical examination, is a critical instrument for the accuracy of the diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal University of Piaui, Teresina, PI, Brazil. balta_melo@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most frequent cancer in the world. Squamous cell cancer often occurs in sun-exposed areas, such as the head and neck. When it involves the breast and ulce-rates, invading the glandular parenchyma, it may mimic breast cancer. Confirmation by means of histopathological examination, combined with clinical examination, is a critical instrument for the accuracy of the diagnosis. We report a case of an epidermoid carcinoma located on the breast skin, initially diagnosed as breast cancer.

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Epidermoid carcinoma of breast skin
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f01: Epidermoid carcinoma of breast skin

Mentions: A 55-year-old female patient presented a lesion on the right breast for two years andstated that initially it was only a small sore that did not heal. The lesion enlargedslowly during the two following years and rapidly in the past three months. At first,the patient did not seek medical attention because of hesitation. When she presented tothe department, she had already undergone a biopsy of the lesion which revealed anundifferentiated carcinoma. Subsequently a mastectomy was planned, as it was consideredas a breast cancer case. On physical examination, a large 15x10cm ulcerated lesion wasobserved on the right breast, extending from the upper portion of the junction of theupper quadrants to an area near the right clavicle, without evidence of invasion of thebreast parenchyma (Figures 1 and 2). The axilla and the supraclavicular fossa had nosuspected lymph nodes. Because of the clinical history, a diagnosis of breast skincarcinoma was considered, which was confirmed by a histopathological examinationrevealing epidermoid carcinoma T4N2M0. Chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound wereunremarkable. Afterwards, a wide excision of the lesion with a 2cm margin was performed.A defect at the surgical field was left open for subsequent tissue grafting because ofan infection observed intraoperatively. She had a good immediate postoperative course,and the skin grafting was scheduled. The definitive histopathological examinationconfirmed a moderately differentiated epidermoid carcinoma with free surgical margins.Six months later, she presented with a defective, but complete cicatrization. Currently,five years after surgery, she remains without evidence of ongoing disease.


Epidermoid carcinoma of the skin mimicking breast cancer.

Melo Neto B, Oliveira Gda P, Vieira SC, Leal LR, Melo Junior JA, Vieira CF - An Bras Dermatol (2013 Mar-Apr)

Epidermoid carcinoma of breast skin
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750890&req=5

f01: Epidermoid carcinoma of breast skin
Mentions: A 55-year-old female patient presented a lesion on the right breast for two years andstated that initially it was only a small sore that did not heal. The lesion enlargedslowly during the two following years and rapidly in the past three months. At first,the patient did not seek medical attention because of hesitation. When she presented tothe department, she had already undergone a biopsy of the lesion which revealed anundifferentiated carcinoma. Subsequently a mastectomy was planned, as it was consideredas a breast cancer case. On physical examination, a large 15x10cm ulcerated lesion wasobserved on the right breast, extending from the upper portion of the junction of theupper quadrants to an area near the right clavicle, without evidence of invasion of thebreast parenchyma (Figures 1 and 2). The axilla and the supraclavicular fossa had nosuspected lymph nodes. Because of the clinical history, a diagnosis of breast skincarcinoma was considered, which was confirmed by a histopathological examinationrevealing epidermoid carcinoma T4N2M0. Chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound wereunremarkable. Afterwards, a wide excision of the lesion with a 2cm margin was performed.A defect at the surgical field was left open for subsequent tissue grafting because ofan infection observed intraoperatively. She had a good immediate postoperative course,and the skin grafting was scheduled. The definitive histopathological examinationconfirmed a moderately differentiated epidermoid carcinoma with free surgical margins.Six months later, she presented with a defective, but complete cicatrization. Currently,five years after surgery, she remains without evidence of ongoing disease.

Bottom Line: Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most frequent cancer in the world.Squamous cell cancer often occurs in sun-exposed areas, such as the head and neck.Confirmation by means of histopathological examination, combined with clinical examination, is a critical instrument for the accuracy of the diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal University of Piaui, Teresina, PI, Brazil. balta_melo@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT
Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most frequent cancer in the world. Squamous cell cancer often occurs in sun-exposed areas, such as the head and neck. When it involves the breast and ulce-rates, invading the glandular parenchyma, it may mimic breast cancer. Confirmation by means of histopathological examination, combined with clinical examination, is a critical instrument for the accuracy of the diagnosis. We report a case of an epidermoid carcinoma located on the breast skin, initially diagnosed as breast cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus