Limits...
First description of seasonality of birth and diagnosis amongst teenagers and young adults with cancer aged 15-24 years in England, 1996-2005.

van Laar M, Kinsey SE, Picton SV, Feltbower RG - BMC Cancer (2013)

Bottom Line: There were 6251 cases diagnosed with leukaemia (n = 1299), lymphoma (n = 3070) and CNS tumours (n = 1882), the overall IR was 92 (95% CI 89-96) per 1,000,000 15-24 year olds per year.There was significant evidence of seasonality around the time of diagnosis for Hodgkin's lymphoma (P < 0.001) with a peak in February, and for 'other CNS tumours' (P = 0.010) with peaks in December and June.Birth peaks for those with 'other Gliomas' (Gliomas other than Astrocytoma and Ependymoma) were observed in May and November (P = 0.015).Further work will examine correlation with specific infections occurring around the time of birth and diagnosis within certain diagnostic groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Paediatric Epidemiology Group, Room 8,49 Worsley Building, Clarendon Way, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: We aimed to examine evidence for an infectious aetiology among teenagers and young adults (TYA) by analysing monthly seasonality of diagnosis and birth amongst 15-24 year olds diagnosed with cancer in England.

Methods: Cases of leukaemia, lymphoma and central nervous system (CNS) tumours were derived from the national TYA cancer register (1996-2005). Incidence rates (IR) and trends were assessed using Poisson regression. Seasonality of diagnosis and birth was assessed using Poisson and logistic regression respectively with cosine functions of varying periods.

Results: There were 6251 cases diagnosed with leukaemia (n = 1299), lymphoma (n = 3070) and CNS tumours (n = 1882), the overall IR was 92 (95% CI 89-96) per 1,000,000 15-24 year olds per year.There was significant evidence of seasonality around the time of diagnosis for Hodgkin's lymphoma (P < 0.001) with a peak in February, and for 'other CNS tumours' (P = 0.010) with peaks in December and June. Birth peaks for those with 'other Gliomas' (Gliomas other than Astrocytoma and Ependymoma) were observed in May and November (P = 0.015).

Conclusion: Our novel findings support an infectious aetiological hypothesis for certain subgroups of TYA cancer in England. Further work will examine correlation with specific infections occurring around the time of birth and diagnosis within certain diagnostic groups.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Sex-adjusted seasonality in month of birth amongst 15–24 year olds with Other Glioma’s, 1996–2005.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750867&req=5

Figure 4: Sex-adjusted seasonality in month of birth amongst 15–24 year olds with Other Glioma’s, 1996–2005.

Mentions: Table 3 gives results of the sex adjusted logistic regression models including tests for seasonality of birth with 12 and 6 month periods. There was no evidence of seasonality with a 12 month period amongst any of the diagnostic groups. We observed significant evidence of a 6 monthly seasonal effect amongst those with ‘other Gliomas’ such that there were maximums in May and November and minimums in February and August (P = 0.015) (Figure 4). The goodness of fit test gives a P-value of 0.874, indicating good model fit. When stratifying the analysis by sex, we observed significant seasonal effects in males with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (peaks in January and July; P = 0.040) and CNS tumours (peaks in December and June; P = 0.006); no seasonality was present in females (Figure 5).


First description of seasonality of birth and diagnosis amongst teenagers and young adults with cancer aged 15-24 years in England, 1996-2005.

van Laar M, Kinsey SE, Picton SV, Feltbower RG - BMC Cancer (2013)

Sex-adjusted seasonality in month of birth amongst 15–24 year olds with Other Glioma’s, 1996–2005.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750867&req=5

Figure 4: Sex-adjusted seasonality in month of birth amongst 15–24 year olds with Other Glioma’s, 1996–2005.
Mentions: Table 3 gives results of the sex adjusted logistic regression models including tests for seasonality of birth with 12 and 6 month periods. There was no evidence of seasonality with a 12 month period amongst any of the diagnostic groups. We observed significant evidence of a 6 monthly seasonal effect amongst those with ‘other Gliomas’ such that there were maximums in May and November and minimums in February and August (P = 0.015) (Figure 4). The goodness of fit test gives a P-value of 0.874, indicating good model fit. When stratifying the analysis by sex, we observed significant seasonal effects in males with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (peaks in January and July; P = 0.040) and CNS tumours (peaks in December and June; P = 0.006); no seasonality was present in females (Figure 5).

Bottom Line: There were 6251 cases diagnosed with leukaemia (n = 1299), lymphoma (n = 3070) and CNS tumours (n = 1882), the overall IR was 92 (95% CI 89-96) per 1,000,000 15-24 year olds per year.There was significant evidence of seasonality around the time of diagnosis for Hodgkin's lymphoma (P < 0.001) with a peak in February, and for 'other CNS tumours' (P = 0.010) with peaks in December and June.Birth peaks for those with 'other Gliomas' (Gliomas other than Astrocytoma and Ependymoma) were observed in May and November (P = 0.015).Further work will examine correlation with specific infections occurring around the time of birth and diagnosis within certain diagnostic groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Paediatric Epidemiology Group, Room 8,49 Worsley Building, Clarendon Way, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: We aimed to examine evidence for an infectious aetiology among teenagers and young adults (TYA) by analysing monthly seasonality of diagnosis and birth amongst 15-24 year olds diagnosed with cancer in England.

Methods: Cases of leukaemia, lymphoma and central nervous system (CNS) tumours were derived from the national TYA cancer register (1996-2005). Incidence rates (IR) and trends were assessed using Poisson regression. Seasonality of diagnosis and birth was assessed using Poisson and logistic regression respectively with cosine functions of varying periods.

Results: There were 6251 cases diagnosed with leukaemia (n = 1299), lymphoma (n = 3070) and CNS tumours (n = 1882), the overall IR was 92 (95% CI 89-96) per 1,000,000 15-24 year olds per year.There was significant evidence of seasonality around the time of diagnosis for Hodgkin's lymphoma (P < 0.001) with a peak in February, and for 'other CNS tumours' (P = 0.010) with peaks in December and June. Birth peaks for those with 'other Gliomas' (Gliomas other than Astrocytoma and Ependymoma) were observed in May and November (P = 0.015).

Conclusion: Our novel findings support an infectious aetiological hypothesis for certain subgroups of TYA cancer in England. Further work will examine correlation with specific infections occurring around the time of birth and diagnosis within certain diagnostic groups.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus