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Trunk isometric force production parameters during erector spinae muscle vibration at different frequencies.

Boucher JA, Normand MC, Descarreaux M - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2013)

Bottom Line: The control of force and its variability are often considered determinants of motor performance and neuromuscular control.The main finding suggests that erector spinae muscle vibration significantly decreases the accuracy in a trunk extension isometric force reproduction task.The results suggest that acute erector spinae muscle vibration interferes with torque generation sequence of the trunk by distorting proprioceptive information in healthy participants.

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ABSTRACT

Background: Vibration is known to alter proprioceptive afferents and create a tonic vibration reflex. The control of force and its variability are often considered determinants of motor performance and neuromuscular control. However, the effect of vibration on paraspinal muscle control and force production remains to be determined.

Methods: Twenty-one healthy adults were asked to perform isometric trunk flexion and extension torque at 60% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction, under three different vibration conditions: no vibration, vibration frequencies of 30 Hz and 80 Hz. Eighteen isometric contractions were performed under each condition without any feedback. Mechanical vibrations were applied bilaterally over the lumbar erector spinae muscles while participants were in neutral standing position. Time to peak torque (TPT), variable error (VE) as well as constant error (CE) and absolute error (AE) in peak torque were calculated and compared between conditions.

Results: The main finding suggests that erector spinae muscle vibration significantly decreases the accuracy in a trunk extension isometric force reproduction task. There was no difference between both vibration frequencies with regard to force production parameters. Antagonist muscles do not seem to be directly affected by vibration stimulation when performing a trunk isometric task.

Conclusions: The results suggest that acute erector spinae muscle vibration interferes with torque generation sequence of the trunk by distorting proprioceptive information in healthy participants.

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Experimental set-up for location of the applied vibration.
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Figure 2: Experimental set-up for location of the applied vibration.

Mentions: Superficial mechanical vibration was applied perpendicularly and bilaterally on lumbar erector spinae muscles at the third lumbar segment level (L3). Vibrators designed with a regulated DC power supply (Zurich, RPS-1012 MB) were held in place with a custom-made Velcro elastic lumbar belt (see Figure 2). The vibrators were placed in a standard position on all participants, by the same examiner, to ensure that the belt was secured with the same tension in all tests. This guaranteed the consistency of the applied vibration. Vibration frequencies used were 30 and 80 Hz with constant amplitude of 0.85 mm. These vibration characteristics were chosen in agreement with those suggested by Cardinale & Lim [29], who found an increased muscle activity when the vibration frequency was set at 30 Hz during whole body vibration, as well as Roll et al. [30] and Calvin-Figuière et al. [31] who suggested that 80 Hz vibration induced optimal kinesthetic illusions.


Trunk isometric force production parameters during erector spinae muscle vibration at different frequencies.

Boucher JA, Normand MC, Descarreaux M - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2013)

Experimental set-up for location of the applied vibration.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750832&req=5

Figure 2: Experimental set-up for location of the applied vibration.
Mentions: Superficial mechanical vibration was applied perpendicularly and bilaterally on lumbar erector spinae muscles at the third lumbar segment level (L3). Vibrators designed with a regulated DC power supply (Zurich, RPS-1012 MB) were held in place with a custom-made Velcro elastic lumbar belt (see Figure 2). The vibrators were placed in a standard position on all participants, by the same examiner, to ensure that the belt was secured with the same tension in all tests. This guaranteed the consistency of the applied vibration. Vibration frequencies used were 30 and 80 Hz with constant amplitude of 0.85 mm. These vibration characteristics were chosen in agreement with those suggested by Cardinale & Lim [29], who found an increased muscle activity when the vibration frequency was set at 30 Hz during whole body vibration, as well as Roll et al. [30] and Calvin-Figuière et al. [31] who suggested that 80 Hz vibration induced optimal kinesthetic illusions.

Bottom Line: The control of force and its variability are often considered determinants of motor performance and neuromuscular control.The main finding suggests that erector spinae muscle vibration significantly decreases the accuracy in a trunk extension isometric force reproduction task.The results suggest that acute erector spinae muscle vibration interferes with torque generation sequence of the trunk by distorting proprioceptive information in healthy participants.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Vibration is known to alter proprioceptive afferents and create a tonic vibration reflex. The control of force and its variability are often considered determinants of motor performance and neuromuscular control. However, the effect of vibration on paraspinal muscle control and force production remains to be determined.

Methods: Twenty-one healthy adults were asked to perform isometric trunk flexion and extension torque at 60% of their maximal voluntary isometric contraction, under three different vibration conditions: no vibration, vibration frequencies of 30 Hz and 80 Hz. Eighteen isometric contractions were performed under each condition without any feedback. Mechanical vibrations were applied bilaterally over the lumbar erector spinae muscles while participants were in neutral standing position. Time to peak torque (TPT), variable error (VE) as well as constant error (CE) and absolute error (AE) in peak torque were calculated and compared between conditions.

Results: The main finding suggests that erector spinae muscle vibration significantly decreases the accuracy in a trunk extension isometric force reproduction task. There was no difference between both vibration frequencies with regard to force production parameters. Antagonist muscles do not seem to be directly affected by vibration stimulation when performing a trunk isometric task.

Conclusions: The results suggest that acute erector spinae muscle vibration interferes with torque generation sequence of the trunk by distorting proprioceptive information in healthy participants.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus