Limits...
Tumor inhibitory T cell immunity may be largely a transplantation artifact not necessarily dependent upon a lack of Tregs.

Prehn RT, Prehn LM - Theor Biol Med Model (2013)

Bottom Line: There exists a very large literature suggesting that T cells come in a variety of species and that without the action of Tregs tumors would seldom survive inhibition by T cell effectors.We believe that much of the evidence supporting the role of Tregs in cancer is compatible with a perhaps simpler hypothesis based upon the demonstration that that small quantities of effector T cells tend to stimulate tumors while larger quantities of seemingly the same cells are inhibitory (an hormesis-like effect).This possibility seems to destroy much of the need to postulate a role for T cell suppressors (Tregs) in cancer, but the exposure of effector T cells to antigen may convert them into Tregs (Tregs do exist).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle 98118, USA. prehn@u.washington.edu

ABSTRACT
There exists a very large literature suggesting that T cells come in a variety of species and that without the action of Tregs tumors would seldom survive inhibition by T cell effectors. We believe that much of the evidence supporting the role of Tregs in cancer is compatible with a perhaps simpler hypothesis based upon the demonstration that that small quantities of effector T cells tend to stimulate tumors while larger quantities of seemingly the same cells are inhibitory (an hormesis-like effect). This possibility seems to destroy much of the need to postulate a role for T cell suppressors (Tregs) in cancer, but the exposure of effector T cells to antigen may convert them into Tregs (Tregs do exist). Furthermore, many other data suggest the possibility that immune inhibition of cancer could be a laboratory artifact seldom if ever seen in unmodified nature.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Idealized chart of data from [[5]].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750814&req=5

Figure 1: Idealized chart of data from [[5]].

Mentions: FigureĀ 1, which has been published previously, depicts an idealized version of the results obtained in [5]. The letters and numerals are only arbitrary aids to facilitate discussion.


Tumor inhibitory T cell immunity may be largely a transplantation artifact not necessarily dependent upon a lack of Tregs.

Prehn RT, Prehn LM - Theor Biol Med Model (2013)

Idealized chart of data from [[5]].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750814&req=5

Figure 1: Idealized chart of data from [[5]].
Mentions: FigureĀ 1, which has been published previously, depicts an idealized version of the results obtained in [5]. The letters and numerals are only arbitrary aids to facilitate discussion.

Bottom Line: There exists a very large literature suggesting that T cells come in a variety of species and that without the action of Tregs tumors would seldom survive inhibition by T cell effectors.We believe that much of the evidence supporting the role of Tregs in cancer is compatible with a perhaps simpler hypothesis based upon the demonstration that that small quantities of effector T cells tend to stimulate tumors while larger quantities of seemingly the same cells are inhibitory (an hormesis-like effect).This possibility seems to destroy much of the need to postulate a role for T cell suppressors (Tregs) in cancer, but the exposure of effector T cells to antigen may convert them into Tregs (Tregs do exist).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle 98118, USA. prehn@u.washington.edu

ABSTRACT
There exists a very large literature suggesting that T cells come in a variety of species and that without the action of Tregs tumors would seldom survive inhibition by T cell effectors. We believe that much of the evidence supporting the role of Tregs in cancer is compatible with a perhaps simpler hypothesis based upon the demonstration that that small quantities of effector T cells tend to stimulate tumors while larger quantities of seemingly the same cells are inhibitory (an hormesis-like effect). This possibility seems to destroy much of the need to postulate a role for T cell suppressors (Tregs) in cancer, but the exposure of effector T cells to antigen may convert them into Tregs (Tregs do exist). Furthermore, many other data suggest the possibility that immune inhibition of cancer could be a laboratory artifact seldom if ever seen in unmodified nature.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus