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The microbiological profile of lacrimal abscess: two decades of experience from a tertiary eye care center.

Ali MJ, Motukupally SR, Joshi SD, Naik MN - J Ophthalmic Inflamm Infect (2013)

Bottom Line: There was no significant difference in the laterality between the right and left eyes.Of the patients, 10.7% (12/112) showed no organisms on smear as well as sterile cultures.Gram-positive organisms were commonly sensitive to penicillins and vancomycin whereas gram-negative organisms were sensitive to quinolones and aminoglycosides.

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Affiliation: Dacryology Service, Ophthalmic Plastics Surgery, L,V, Prasad Eye Institute, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500034, India. drjaved007@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study is to exclusively report the microbiological spectrum of lacrimal abscess and the antibiotic sensitivity patterns of the organisms. Retrospective interventional study on 112 eyes of 112 patients who presented to the ophthalmic plastic clinic of a tertiary eye care center over a period of 23 years from January 1990 to February 2013 with lacrimal abscess were reviewed for demographic and microbiological profile. The culture results, organisms isolated, and their antibiotic sensitivity were studied.

Results: The mean age at presentation was 37 years. The female to male ratio was 2:1. There was no significant difference in the laterality between the right and left eyes. Gram-positive organisms were the most commonly isolated accounting for 56.3% (63/112), and the commonest species isolated was Staphylococcus aureus in 25% (28/112) of the patients. Hemophilus influenzae was the commonest gram-negative isolate accounting for 30.2% of all the gram-negative isolates. Of the patients, 10.7% (12/112) showed no organisms on smear as well as sterile cultures. Gram-positive organisms were commonly sensitive to penicillins and vancomycin whereas gram-negative organisms were sensitive to quinolones and aminoglycosides.

Conclusions: Gram-positive organisms are quite common as compared to gram-negative ones in cases of lacrimal abscess. The results of this study have significant bearing on the treatment of patients with lacrimal abscess.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical spectrum of lacrimal abscess. External photograph showing a well-localized right lacrimal abscess with discharge at the medial canthus (a). Clinical photograph depicting the pus point of the abscess (b). A neonate with right lacrimal abscess (c). Lacrimal abscess with orbital cellulitis (d).
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Figure 1: Clinical spectrum of lacrimal abscess. External photograph showing a well-localized right lacrimal abscess with discharge at the medial canthus (a). Clinical photograph depicting the pus point of the abscess (b). A neonate with right lacrimal abscess (c). Lacrimal abscess with orbital cellulitis (d).

Mentions: Medical records of patients diagnosed with lacrimal abscess, which underwent percutaneous drainage and the purulent material was sent for microbiological analysis from January 1990 through February 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The study was carried out in accordance with the ethical guidelines of the Declaration of Helsinki, and institutional review board approval was taken. The diagnosis of lacrimal abscess was based clinically on the presence of a pus-filled lacrimal sac and perilacrimal tissues in a setting of an acute dacryocystitis (Figure 1a,b,c,d). Data retrieved include demographic profile, clinical examination findings, purulent material inoculation onto smears, and various culture media. None of the patients were using antibiotics at presentation. The culture results, organisms isolated, and their antibiotic sensitivity were studied (Figure 2).


The microbiological profile of lacrimal abscess: two decades of experience from a tertiary eye care center.

Ali MJ, Motukupally SR, Joshi SD, Naik MN - J Ophthalmic Inflamm Infect (2013)

Clinical spectrum of lacrimal abscess. External photograph showing a well-localized right lacrimal abscess with discharge at the medial canthus (a). Clinical photograph depicting the pus point of the abscess (b). A neonate with right lacrimal abscess (c). Lacrimal abscess with orbital cellulitis (d).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750744&req=5

Figure 1: Clinical spectrum of lacrimal abscess. External photograph showing a well-localized right lacrimal abscess with discharge at the medial canthus (a). Clinical photograph depicting the pus point of the abscess (b). A neonate with right lacrimal abscess (c). Lacrimal abscess with orbital cellulitis (d).
Mentions: Medical records of patients diagnosed with lacrimal abscess, which underwent percutaneous drainage and the purulent material was sent for microbiological analysis from January 1990 through February 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. The study was carried out in accordance with the ethical guidelines of the Declaration of Helsinki, and institutional review board approval was taken. The diagnosis of lacrimal abscess was based clinically on the presence of a pus-filled lacrimal sac and perilacrimal tissues in a setting of an acute dacryocystitis (Figure 1a,b,c,d). Data retrieved include demographic profile, clinical examination findings, purulent material inoculation onto smears, and various culture media. None of the patients were using antibiotics at presentation. The culture results, organisms isolated, and their antibiotic sensitivity were studied (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: There was no significant difference in the laterality between the right and left eyes.Of the patients, 10.7% (12/112) showed no organisms on smear as well as sterile cultures.Gram-positive organisms were commonly sensitive to penicillins and vancomycin whereas gram-negative organisms were sensitive to quinolones and aminoglycosides.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Dacryology Service, Ophthalmic Plastics Surgery, L,V, Prasad Eye Institute, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad 500034, India. drjaved007@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study is to exclusively report the microbiological spectrum of lacrimal abscess and the antibiotic sensitivity patterns of the organisms. Retrospective interventional study on 112 eyes of 112 patients who presented to the ophthalmic plastic clinic of a tertiary eye care center over a period of 23 years from January 1990 to February 2013 with lacrimal abscess were reviewed for demographic and microbiological profile. The culture results, organisms isolated, and their antibiotic sensitivity were studied.

Results: The mean age at presentation was 37 years. The female to male ratio was 2:1. There was no significant difference in the laterality between the right and left eyes. Gram-positive organisms were the most commonly isolated accounting for 56.3% (63/112), and the commonest species isolated was Staphylococcus aureus in 25% (28/112) of the patients. Hemophilus influenzae was the commonest gram-negative isolate accounting for 30.2% of all the gram-negative isolates. Of the patients, 10.7% (12/112) showed no organisms on smear as well as sterile cultures. Gram-positive organisms were commonly sensitive to penicillins and vancomycin whereas gram-negative organisms were sensitive to quinolones and aminoglycosides.

Conclusions: Gram-positive organisms are quite common as compared to gram-negative ones in cases of lacrimal abscess. The results of this study have significant bearing on the treatment of patients with lacrimal abscess.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus