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Dietary glutamine supplementation prevents mucosal injury and modulates intestinal epithelial restitution following acetic acid induced intestinal injury in rats.

Swaid F, Sukhotnik I, Matter I, Berkowitz D, Hadjittofi C, Pollak Y, Lavy A - Nutr Metab (Lond) (2013)

Bottom Line: Beneficial effects of glutamine (GLN) have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders.AA-induced intestinal injury resulted in a significantly increased intestinal injury score with concomitant inhibition of cell turnover (reduced proliferation and enhanced apoptosis).Treatment with dietary GLN supplementation resulted in a decreased intestinal injury score with concomitant stimulation of cell turnover (enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Bnai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Beneficial effects of glutamine (GLN) have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the preventative effect of oral GLN supplementation against acetic acid (AA) induced intestinal injury in a rat. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (CONTR) rats underwent laparotomy, control-glutamine (CONTR-GLN) rats were treated with enteral glutamine given in drinking water (2%) 48 hours before and five days following laparotomy, AA rats underwent laparotomy and injection of AA into an isolated jejunal loop, and acetic acid-glutamine (AA-GLN) rats underwent AA-induced injury and were treated with enteral GLN 48 hours before and 5 days following laparotomy. Intestinal mucosal damage (Park's injury score), mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined five days following intestinal injury. Western blotting was used to determine p-ERK and bax protein levels. AA-induced intestinal injury resulted in a significantly increased intestinal injury score with concomitant inhibition of cell turnover (reduced proliferation and enhanced apoptosis). Treatment with dietary GLN supplementation resulted in a decreased intestinal injury score with concomitant stimulation of cell turnover (enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis). In conclusion, pre-treatment with oral GLN prevents mucosal injury and improves intestinal recovery following AA-induced intestinal injury in rats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of acetic acid and glutamine on the microscopic intestinal appearance. As expected, control rats demonstrate a normal histologic architecture. AA rats show extended subepithelial space and epithelial lifting along villus sides (Park score 3–4). AA-GLN rats exhibited a less marked subepithelial space at villus tip (Park score 1–2). Values are mean ± SEM. CONTR-control; AA- acetic acid; GLN- glutamine. * P < 0.05 vs CONTR rats, † P < 0.05 AA-GLN vs AA rats.
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Figure 2: Effect of acetic acid and glutamine on the microscopic intestinal appearance. As expected, control rats demonstrate a normal histologic architecture. AA rats show extended subepithelial space and epithelial lifting along villus sides (Park score 3–4). AA-GLN rats exhibited a less marked subepithelial space at villus tip (Park score 1–2). Values are mean ± SEM. CONTR-control; AA- acetic acid; GLN- glutamine. * P < 0.05 vs CONTR rats, † P < 0.05 AA-GLN vs AA rats.

Mentions: Whereas the jejunum and the ileum of CONTR and CONTR-GLN rats exhibited normal mucosal architecture with intact villi, AA animals exhibited a significant histologic injury in damaged jejunum and less significant changes in ileum (Figure 2) as well as an inflammatory cells accumulation, edema and hemorrhage that seen mainly at site of the injury. AA rats (Group C) demonstrated a significant increase in the mean intestinal injury grade in jejunum (three-fold, p < 0.05) and ileum (six-fold, p < 0.05) compared to CONTR rats. Pre-treatment with oral GLN prevented intestinal mucosal injury caused by AA. AA-GLN rats attracted significantly lower histological scores in jejunum (four-fold decrease, p < 0.05) and ileum (three-fold, p < 0.05) compared to AA rats. However, AA-GLN rats demonstrated a less effects on inflammatory cells accumulation, edema and hemorrhage at site of the injury.


Dietary glutamine supplementation prevents mucosal injury and modulates intestinal epithelial restitution following acetic acid induced intestinal injury in rats.

Swaid F, Sukhotnik I, Matter I, Berkowitz D, Hadjittofi C, Pollak Y, Lavy A - Nutr Metab (Lond) (2013)

Effect of acetic acid and glutamine on the microscopic intestinal appearance. As expected, control rats demonstrate a normal histologic architecture. AA rats show extended subepithelial space and epithelial lifting along villus sides (Park score 3–4). AA-GLN rats exhibited a less marked subepithelial space at villus tip (Park score 1–2). Values are mean ± SEM. CONTR-control; AA- acetic acid; GLN- glutamine. * P < 0.05 vs CONTR rats, † P < 0.05 AA-GLN vs AA rats.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750704&req=5

Figure 2: Effect of acetic acid and glutamine on the microscopic intestinal appearance. As expected, control rats demonstrate a normal histologic architecture. AA rats show extended subepithelial space and epithelial lifting along villus sides (Park score 3–4). AA-GLN rats exhibited a less marked subepithelial space at villus tip (Park score 1–2). Values are mean ± SEM. CONTR-control; AA- acetic acid; GLN- glutamine. * P < 0.05 vs CONTR rats, † P < 0.05 AA-GLN vs AA rats.
Mentions: Whereas the jejunum and the ileum of CONTR and CONTR-GLN rats exhibited normal mucosal architecture with intact villi, AA animals exhibited a significant histologic injury in damaged jejunum and less significant changes in ileum (Figure 2) as well as an inflammatory cells accumulation, edema and hemorrhage that seen mainly at site of the injury. AA rats (Group C) demonstrated a significant increase in the mean intestinal injury grade in jejunum (three-fold, p < 0.05) and ileum (six-fold, p < 0.05) compared to CONTR rats. Pre-treatment with oral GLN prevented intestinal mucosal injury caused by AA. AA-GLN rats attracted significantly lower histological scores in jejunum (four-fold decrease, p < 0.05) and ileum (three-fold, p < 0.05) compared to AA rats. However, AA-GLN rats demonstrated a less effects on inflammatory cells accumulation, edema and hemorrhage at site of the injury.

Bottom Line: Beneficial effects of glutamine (GLN) have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders.AA-induced intestinal injury resulted in a significantly increased intestinal injury score with concomitant inhibition of cell turnover (reduced proliferation and enhanced apoptosis).Treatment with dietary GLN supplementation resulted in a decreased intestinal injury score with concomitant stimulation of cell turnover (enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Bnai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Beneficial effects of glutamine (GLN) have been described in many gastrointestinal disorders. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the preventative effect of oral GLN supplementation against acetic acid (AA) induced intestinal injury in a rat. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (CONTR) rats underwent laparotomy, control-glutamine (CONTR-GLN) rats were treated with enteral glutamine given in drinking water (2%) 48 hours before and five days following laparotomy, AA rats underwent laparotomy and injection of AA into an isolated jejunal loop, and acetic acid-glutamine (AA-GLN) rats underwent AA-induced injury and were treated with enteral GLN 48 hours before and 5 days following laparotomy. Intestinal mucosal damage (Park's injury score), mucosal structural changes, enterocyte proliferation and enterocyte apoptosis were determined five days following intestinal injury. Western blotting was used to determine p-ERK and bax protein levels. AA-induced intestinal injury resulted in a significantly increased intestinal injury score with concomitant inhibition of cell turnover (reduced proliferation and enhanced apoptosis). Treatment with dietary GLN supplementation resulted in a decreased intestinal injury score with concomitant stimulation of cell turnover (enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis). In conclusion, pre-treatment with oral GLN prevents mucosal injury and improves intestinal recovery following AA-induced intestinal injury in rats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus