Limits...
A comparison of trends in melanoma mortality in New Zealand and Australia: the two countries with the highest melanoma incidence and mortality in the world.

Sneyd MJ, Cox B - BMC Cancer (2013)

Bottom Line: Age-specific mortality rates were plotted against period and the median year of birth to illustrate age-group and birth cohort effects.There was evidence of recent significant decreases in mortality in younger Australians and less so in New Zealand women aged under 45 years.In Australia, a decline in mortality started for generations born from about 1958 but in New Zealand there is possibly a decrease only in generations born since 1968.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: New Zealand and Australia have the highest incidence and mortality rates from cutaneous melanoma in the world. The predominantly fair-skinned New Zealanders and Australians both enjoy sun, tanned skin and the outdoors, and differences in these activities among generations have been important determinants of trends in melanoma mortality.

Methods: Five-year age-specific and age-standardised mortality rates were calculated for each country for 5-year time periods. Tests for trends in age-specific rates were performed using the Mantel-Haenszel extension chi-square test. The age-adjusted mortality rate ratios for New Zealand/Australia were plotted against period of death to show relative changes in mortality over time. Age-specific mortality rates were plotted against period and the median year of birth to illustrate age-group and birth cohort effects. To compare the mortality of birth cohorts, age-adjusted melanoma mortality rate ratios were calculated for the birth cohorts in the quin-quennial tables of mortality rates.

Results: The age-standardised mortality rate for melanoma increased in both sexes in New Zealand and Australia from 1968 to 2007, but the increase was greater in New Zealanders and women in particular. There was evidence of recent significant decreases in mortality in younger Australians and less so in New Zealand women aged under 45 years. Mortality from melanoma increased in successive generations born from about 1893 to 1918. In Australia, a decline in mortality started for generations born from about 1958 but in New Zealand there is possibly a decrease only in generations born since 1968.

Conclusions: Mortality trends in New Zealand and Australia are discrepant. It is too early to know if the pattern in mortality rates in New Zealand is simply a delayed response to melanoma control activities compared with Australia, whereby we can expect the same downward trend in similar age groups in the next few years. Specific research is needed to better understand and control the increases in mortality and thickness of melanoma in New Zealand.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Rate ratios for age-standardised melanoma mortality: New Zealand/Australia. The line of equal mortality rates (rate ratio = 1) is marked.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750694&req=5

Figure 3: Rate ratios for age-standardised melanoma mortality: New Zealand/Australia. The line of equal mortality rates (rate ratio = 1) is marked.

Mentions: From 1968 to 2007 the age-standardised mortality rate for melanoma increased in both New Zealand and Australian men (see Additional file 1: Table S1), but more so in New Zealand men (Figure 3). During the years 1968–1997 mortality rates for melanoma were very similar in New Zealand and Australian men (age-adjusted mortality rate ratios ranged from 0.99 to 1.07), but in 1998–2002 and 2003–2007 the mortality rates in New Zealand men were significantly higher than in Australian men. Among women the pattern of mortality rates was somewhat different. Although the mortality rates from melanoma increased significantly in both countries after 1968–1972 (see Additional file 1: Table S2), they increased more in New Zealand women and considerably earlier than occurred for men. From 1973–1977 all mortality rates in New Zealand women were significantly higher than Australian women, and by 2003–2007 New Zealand women had a 40% higher melanoma mortality rate compared to Australia (Figure 3).


A comparison of trends in melanoma mortality in New Zealand and Australia: the two countries with the highest melanoma incidence and mortality in the world.

Sneyd MJ, Cox B - BMC Cancer (2013)

Rate ratios for age-standardised melanoma mortality: New Zealand/Australia. The line of equal mortality rates (rate ratio = 1) is marked.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750694&req=5

Figure 3: Rate ratios for age-standardised melanoma mortality: New Zealand/Australia. The line of equal mortality rates (rate ratio = 1) is marked.
Mentions: From 1968 to 2007 the age-standardised mortality rate for melanoma increased in both New Zealand and Australian men (see Additional file 1: Table S1), but more so in New Zealand men (Figure 3). During the years 1968–1997 mortality rates for melanoma were very similar in New Zealand and Australian men (age-adjusted mortality rate ratios ranged from 0.99 to 1.07), but in 1998–2002 and 2003–2007 the mortality rates in New Zealand men were significantly higher than in Australian men. Among women the pattern of mortality rates was somewhat different. Although the mortality rates from melanoma increased significantly in both countries after 1968–1972 (see Additional file 1: Table S2), they increased more in New Zealand women and considerably earlier than occurred for men. From 1973–1977 all mortality rates in New Zealand women were significantly higher than Australian women, and by 2003–2007 New Zealand women had a 40% higher melanoma mortality rate compared to Australia (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Age-specific mortality rates were plotted against period and the median year of birth to illustrate age-group and birth cohort effects.There was evidence of recent significant decreases in mortality in younger Australians and less so in New Zealand women aged under 45 years.In Australia, a decline in mortality started for generations born from about 1958 but in New Zealand there is possibly a decrease only in generations born since 1968.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: New Zealand and Australia have the highest incidence and mortality rates from cutaneous melanoma in the world. The predominantly fair-skinned New Zealanders and Australians both enjoy sun, tanned skin and the outdoors, and differences in these activities among generations have been important determinants of trends in melanoma mortality.

Methods: Five-year age-specific and age-standardised mortality rates were calculated for each country for 5-year time periods. Tests for trends in age-specific rates were performed using the Mantel-Haenszel extension chi-square test. The age-adjusted mortality rate ratios for New Zealand/Australia were plotted against period of death to show relative changes in mortality over time. Age-specific mortality rates were plotted against period and the median year of birth to illustrate age-group and birth cohort effects. To compare the mortality of birth cohorts, age-adjusted melanoma mortality rate ratios were calculated for the birth cohorts in the quin-quennial tables of mortality rates.

Results: The age-standardised mortality rate for melanoma increased in both sexes in New Zealand and Australia from 1968 to 2007, but the increase was greater in New Zealanders and women in particular. There was evidence of recent significant decreases in mortality in younger Australians and less so in New Zealand women aged under 45 years. Mortality from melanoma increased in successive generations born from about 1893 to 1918. In Australia, a decline in mortality started for generations born from about 1958 but in New Zealand there is possibly a decrease only in generations born since 1968.

Conclusions: Mortality trends in New Zealand and Australia are discrepant. It is too early to know if the pattern in mortality rates in New Zealand is simply a delayed response to melanoma control activities compared with Australia, whereby we can expect the same downward trend in similar age groups in the next few years. Specific research is needed to better understand and control the increases in mortality and thickness of melanoma in New Zealand.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus