Limits...
Physical activity and mortality in a prospective cohort of middle-aged and elderly men - a time perspective.

Bellavia A, Bottai M, Wolk A, Orsini N - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2013)

Bottom Line: We found a strong evidence of non-linearity between TPA and the 10th survival percentile (P-value < 0.001).Above the median TPA additional activity was not significantly associated with better survival.We found that a physically active lifestyle is associated with a substantial improvement in survival time, up to 2.5 years over 13 years of follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. andrea.bellavia@ki.se

ABSTRACT

Background: Higher physical activity (PA) levels are known to be associated with lower risk of death. Less attention, however, has been paid to directly evaluate the effect of PA on the time by which a certain fraction of the population has died.

Methods: A population-based cohort of 29,362 men 45 to 79 years of age was followed from January 1998 to December 2010. A total of 4,570 men died. PA was assessed through a self-administrated questionnaire. Adjusted differences in the number of months by which 10% (10th percentile) of the cohort has died, according to levels of total PA (TPA) and different domains of PA were estimated using Laplace regression.

Results: Overall, the 10th survival percentile was 9.6 years, that is, 90% of the cohort lived longer than 9.6 years. We found a strong evidence of non-linearity between TPA and the 10th survival percentile (P-value < 0.001). Compared to men with the lowest TPA (29 metabolic equivalents (MET)-hrs/day), men with a median TPA (41 MET-hrs/day) had 30 months longer survival (95% CI: 25-35). Below the median TPA, every increment of 4 MET-hrs/day, approximately a 30 minutes brisk pace daily walk, was associated with a longer survival of 11 months (95% CI: 8-15). Above the median TPA additional activity was not significantly associated with better survival.

Conclusions: We found that a physically active lifestyle is associated with a substantial improvement in survival time, up to 2.5 years over 13 years of follow-up.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Tenth survival percentile differences, differences in months by which ten percent of the cohort has died as function of total physical activity. Data were fitted using a Laplace regression model with restricted cubic splines with 3 knots (36, 41 and 48 MET-hrs/day) of the distribution of total physical activity. The estimates were adjusted for baseline age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and educational level. Dashed lines represent 95% confidence limits. The reference value of total physical activity is the median of the bottom quartile (36.5 MET-hrs/day). Tick marks represent position of men who died. The histogram is the distribution of total physical activity in the cohort.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750581&req=5

Figure 1: Tenth survival percentile differences, differences in months by which ten percent of the cohort has died as function of total physical activity. Data were fitted using a Laplace regression model with restricted cubic splines with 3 knots (36, 41 and 48 MET-hrs/day) of the distribution of total physical activity. The estimates were adjusted for baseline age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and educational level. Dashed lines represent 95% confidence limits. The reference value of total physical activity is the median of the bottom quartile (36.5 MET-hrs/day). Tick marks represent position of men who died. The histogram is the distribution of total physical activity in the cohort.

Mentions: We next investigated the dose–response relation between TPA and time to death (Figure 1). We found a strong evidence of non-linearity (P-value < 0.001) between TPA and the time interval by which 10% of the cohort die. Compared to men with the lowest TPA (29 MET-hrs/day), men with a median TPA (41 MET-hrs/day) had 30 months longer survival (95% CI: 25–35). Below the median TPA, every increment of 4 MET-hrs/day, approximately a 30 minutes brisk pace daily walk, was associated with a longer survival of 11 months (95% CI: 8–15). Above the median TPA additional activity was not significantly associated with better survival. Extreme PA levels tended to be associated with shorter survival time, although survival percentile differences between extremely high values and the median value of TPA were not statistically significant (Figure 1).


Physical activity and mortality in a prospective cohort of middle-aged and elderly men - a time perspective.

Bellavia A, Bottai M, Wolk A, Orsini N - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2013)

Tenth survival percentile differences, differences in months by which ten percent of the cohort has died as function of total physical activity. Data were fitted using a Laplace regression model with restricted cubic splines with 3 knots (36, 41 and 48 MET-hrs/day) of the distribution of total physical activity. The estimates were adjusted for baseline age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and educational level. Dashed lines represent 95% confidence limits. The reference value of total physical activity is the median of the bottom quartile (36.5 MET-hrs/day). Tick marks represent position of men who died. The histogram is the distribution of total physical activity in the cohort.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750581&req=5

Figure 1: Tenth survival percentile differences, differences in months by which ten percent of the cohort has died as function of total physical activity. Data were fitted using a Laplace regression model with restricted cubic splines with 3 knots (36, 41 and 48 MET-hrs/day) of the distribution of total physical activity. The estimates were adjusted for baseline age, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and educational level. Dashed lines represent 95% confidence limits. The reference value of total physical activity is the median of the bottom quartile (36.5 MET-hrs/day). Tick marks represent position of men who died. The histogram is the distribution of total physical activity in the cohort.
Mentions: We next investigated the dose–response relation between TPA and time to death (Figure 1). We found a strong evidence of non-linearity (P-value < 0.001) between TPA and the time interval by which 10% of the cohort die. Compared to men with the lowest TPA (29 MET-hrs/day), men with a median TPA (41 MET-hrs/day) had 30 months longer survival (95% CI: 25–35). Below the median TPA, every increment of 4 MET-hrs/day, approximately a 30 minutes brisk pace daily walk, was associated with a longer survival of 11 months (95% CI: 8–15). Above the median TPA additional activity was not significantly associated with better survival. Extreme PA levels tended to be associated with shorter survival time, although survival percentile differences between extremely high values and the median value of TPA were not statistically significant (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: We found a strong evidence of non-linearity between TPA and the 10th survival percentile (P-value < 0.001).Above the median TPA additional activity was not significantly associated with better survival.We found that a physically active lifestyle is associated with a substantial improvement in survival time, up to 2.5 years over 13 years of follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. andrea.bellavia@ki.se

ABSTRACT

Background: Higher physical activity (PA) levels are known to be associated with lower risk of death. Less attention, however, has been paid to directly evaluate the effect of PA on the time by which a certain fraction of the population has died.

Methods: A population-based cohort of 29,362 men 45 to 79 years of age was followed from January 1998 to December 2010. A total of 4,570 men died. PA was assessed through a self-administrated questionnaire. Adjusted differences in the number of months by which 10% (10th percentile) of the cohort has died, according to levels of total PA (TPA) and different domains of PA were estimated using Laplace regression.

Results: Overall, the 10th survival percentile was 9.6 years, that is, 90% of the cohort lived longer than 9.6 years. We found a strong evidence of non-linearity between TPA and the 10th survival percentile (P-value < 0.001). Compared to men with the lowest TPA (29 metabolic equivalents (MET)-hrs/day), men with a median TPA (41 MET-hrs/day) had 30 months longer survival (95% CI: 25-35). Below the median TPA, every increment of 4 MET-hrs/day, approximately a 30 minutes brisk pace daily walk, was associated with a longer survival of 11 months (95% CI: 8-15). Above the median TPA additional activity was not significantly associated with better survival.

Conclusions: We found that a physically active lifestyle is associated with a substantial improvement in survival time, up to 2.5 years over 13 years of follow-up.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus