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Sustainable approach toward synthesis of green functional carbonaceous 3-D micro/nanostructures from biomass.

Tavangar A, Tan B, Venkatakrishnan K - Nanoscale Res Lett (2013)

Bottom Line: Our results demonstrate that by controlling the laser fluence, structures with a variety of different morphologies from nanostructures to microstructures can be achieved.Also, the results indicate that altering the laser processing parameters influences the chemical composition of the synthesized structures.These structures, as-synthesized or as nanocomposite fillers, can have practical uses in electronic, sensing, biological, and environmental applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada. venkat@ryerson.ca.

ABSTRACT
This study proposes a novel technique to synthesize functional carbonaceous three-dimensional (3-D) micro/nanocompounds from agricultural by-products using femtosecond laser irradiation. Biowastes of rice husk and wheat straw are value-engineered to carbonaceous structures in a single-step process under ambient conditions. Our results demonstrate that by controlling the laser fluence, structures with a variety of different morphologies from nanostructures to microstructures can be achieved. Also, the results indicate that altering the laser processing parameters influences the chemical composition of the synthesized structures. This sustainable approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3-D micro/nanofibrous compounds from biowaste materials. These structures, as-synthesized or as nanocomposite fillers, can have practical uses in electronic, sensing, biological, and environmental applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental procedure.
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Figure 1: Experimental procedure.

Mentions: Rice husks and wheat straws were washed with distilled water and dried overnight in an incubator at 50°C. They were then ground into powder and coated on Si substrates. The specimens were irradiated by single-point femtosecond laser processing at different laser dwell times under ambient conditions. Altering the laser dwell time, the time that the laser beam irradiates a particular point on the substrate, allows controlling the number of pulses used to perform laser point processing. The laser source utilized was a 1,040-nm wavelength direct diode-pumped Yb-doped fiber amplified ultrafast laser system. The laser pulse repetition rate ranged from 200 kHz to 26 MHz. The maximum output power of the laser and the laser pulse width were 15.5 W and 214 fs, respectively. This system operates under low-noise performance due to the solid state operation and high spatial mode quality of fiber lasers. Also, all the laser parameters, such as laser repetition rate, pulse width, and beam power, were computer-monitored, which allowed a precise interaction with the performed experiments. The schematic diagram of the synthesis procedure is depicted in Figure 1. The morphology and chemical composition of the micro/nanostructures were characterized using SEM and EDS analyses, respectively.


Sustainable approach toward synthesis of green functional carbonaceous 3-D micro/nanostructures from biomass.

Tavangar A, Tan B, Venkatakrishnan K - Nanoscale Res Lett (2013)

Experimental procedure.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750559&req=5

Figure 1: Experimental procedure.
Mentions: Rice husks and wheat straws were washed with distilled water and dried overnight in an incubator at 50°C. They were then ground into powder and coated on Si substrates. The specimens were irradiated by single-point femtosecond laser processing at different laser dwell times under ambient conditions. Altering the laser dwell time, the time that the laser beam irradiates a particular point on the substrate, allows controlling the number of pulses used to perform laser point processing. The laser source utilized was a 1,040-nm wavelength direct diode-pumped Yb-doped fiber amplified ultrafast laser system. The laser pulse repetition rate ranged from 200 kHz to 26 MHz. The maximum output power of the laser and the laser pulse width were 15.5 W and 214 fs, respectively. This system operates under low-noise performance due to the solid state operation and high spatial mode quality of fiber lasers. Also, all the laser parameters, such as laser repetition rate, pulse width, and beam power, were computer-monitored, which allowed a precise interaction with the performed experiments. The schematic diagram of the synthesis procedure is depicted in Figure 1. The morphology and chemical composition of the micro/nanostructures were characterized using SEM and EDS analyses, respectively.

Bottom Line: Our results demonstrate that by controlling the laser fluence, structures with a variety of different morphologies from nanostructures to microstructures can be achieved.Also, the results indicate that altering the laser processing parameters influences the chemical composition of the synthesized structures.These structures, as-synthesized or as nanocomposite fillers, can have practical uses in electronic, sensing, biological, and environmental applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada. venkat@ryerson.ca.

ABSTRACT
This study proposes a novel technique to synthesize functional carbonaceous three-dimensional (3-D) micro/nanocompounds from agricultural by-products using femtosecond laser irradiation. Biowastes of rice husk and wheat straw are value-engineered to carbonaceous structures in a single-step process under ambient conditions. Our results demonstrate that by controlling the laser fluence, structures with a variety of different morphologies from nanostructures to microstructures can be achieved. Also, the results indicate that altering the laser processing parameters influences the chemical composition of the synthesized structures. This sustainable approach presents an important step towards synthesizing 3-D micro/nanofibrous compounds from biowaste materials. These structures, as-synthesized or as nanocomposite fillers, can have practical uses in electronic, sensing, biological, and environmental applications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus