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Cortical network properties revealed by SSVEP in anesthetized rats.

Xu P, Tian C, Zhang Y, Jing W, Wang Z, Liu T, Hu J, Tian Y, Xia Y, Yao D - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) are assumed to be regulated by multiple brain areas, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well understood.In this study, we utilized multi-channel intracranial recordings together with network analysis to investigate the underlying relationships between SSVEP and brain networks in anesthetized rat.All these aspects consistently indicate that SSVEP response is closely correlated with network properties, the reorganization of the background network plays a crucial role in SSVEP production, and the background network may provide a physiological marker for evaluating the potential of SSVEP generation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China.

ABSTRACT
Steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) are assumed to be regulated by multiple brain areas, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we utilized multi-channel intracranial recordings together with network analysis to investigate the underlying relationships between SSVEP and brain networks in anesthetized rat. We examined the relationship between SSVEP amplitude and the network topological properties for different stimulation frequencies, the synergetic dynamic changes of the amplitude and topological properties in each rat, the network properties of the control state, and the individual difference of SSVEP network attributes existing among rats. All these aspects consistently indicate that SSVEP response is closely correlated with network properties, the reorganization of the background network plays a crucial role in SSVEP production, and the background network may provide a physiological marker for evaluating the potential of SSVEP generation.

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The distribution of the intracranial electrodes.Detail of those positions are: L, left;_R, right; FrA, frontal association cortex; M1, primary motor cortex; S1FL, primary somatosensory cortex, forelimb region; PtA, parietal association cortex; V2, secondary visual cortex; V1, primary visual cortex; Cb, cerebellum. This figure was produced by Wei Jin and Jun Hu.
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f7: The distribution of the intracranial electrodes.Detail of those positions are: L, left;_R, right; FrA, frontal association cortex; M1, primary motor cortex; S1FL, primary somatosensory cortex, forelimb region; PtA, parietal association cortex; V2, secondary visual cortex; V1, primary visual cortex; Cb, cerebellum. This figure was produced by Wei Jin and Jun Hu.

Mentions: Ten male Wistar rats (body weight 290–320 g) were included in the study. Electrode implantation was performed under general anesthesia (sodium pentobarbital 60 mg/kg bodyweight, i.p.), complemented with 0.6 ml atropine sulfate (0.5 mg/ml, s.c.) to prevent excessive secretion. During stereotactic surgery, wounds were infiltrated with lignocaine (2%). Additional pentobarbital (15 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally when required. All stereotactic coordinates were relative to bregma with the skull surface flat, according to Paxinos and Watson (2005)26. Thirteen small holes were drilled in the skull over the frontal area, primary motor area, primary somatosensory cortex, parietal lobe, and primary (secondary) visual cortex (regions potentially involved in SSVEP generation), and the temporal muscle was incised and drilled vertically to skull surface flat. Stainless-steel screw electrodes (diameter, 200 μm) were implanted in the drill holes, with the reference set at cerebrum (Cb), which exhibits lower activity compared to other brain sites2728. The 13-electrode montage is shown in Figure 7.


Cortical network properties revealed by SSVEP in anesthetized rats.

Xu P, Tian C, Zhang Y, Jing W, Wang Z, Liu T, Hu J, Tian Y, Xia Y, Yao D - Sci Rep (2013)

The distribution of the intracranial electrodes.Detail of those positions are: L, left;_R, right; FrA, frontal association cortex; M1, primary motor cortex; S1FL, primary somatosensory cortex, forelimb region; PtA, parietal association cortex; V2, secondary visual cortex; V1, primary visual cortex; Cb, cerebellum. This figure was produced by Wei Jin and Jun Hu.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750539&req=5

f7: The distribution of the intracranial electrodes.Detail of those positions are: L, left;_R, right; FrA, frontal association cortex; M1, primary motor cortex; S1FL, primary somatosensory cortex, forelimb region; PtA, parietal association cortex; V2, secondary visual cortex; V1, primary visual cortex; Cb, cerebellum. This figure was produced by Wei Jin and Jun Hu.
Mentions: Ten male Wistar rats (body weight 290–320 g) were included in the study. Electrode implantation was performed under general anesthesia (sodium pentobarbital 60 mg/kg bodyweight, i.p.), complemented with 0.6 ml atropine sulfate (0.5 mg/ml, s.c.) to prevent excessive secretion. During stereotactic surgery, wounds were infiltrated with lignocaine (2%). Additional pentobarbital (15 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally when required. All stereotactic coordinates were relative to bregma with the skull surface flat, according to Paxinos and Watson (2005)26. Thirteen small holes were drilled in the skull over the frontal area, primary motor area, primary somatosensory cortex, parietal lobe, and primary (secondary) visual cortex (regions potentially involved in SSVEP generation), and the temporal muscle was incised and drilled vertically to skull surface flat. Stainless-steel screw electrodes (diameter, 200 μm) were implanted in the drill holes, with the reference set at cerebrum (Cb), which exhibits lower activity compared to other brain sites2728. The 13-electrode montage is shown in Figure 7.

Bottom Line: Steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) are assumed to be regulated by multiple brain areas, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well understood.In this study, we utilized multi-channel intracranial recordings together with network analysis to investigate the underlying relationships between SSVEP and brain networks in anesthetized rat.All these aspects consistently indicate that SSVEP response is closely correlated with network properties, the reorganization of the background network plays a crucial role in SSVEP production, and the background network may provide a physiological marker for evaluating the potential of SSVEP generation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China.

ABSTRACT
Steady state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) are assumed to be regulated by multiple brain areas, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, we utilized multi-channel intracranial recordings together with network analysis to investigate the underlying relationships between SSVEP and brain networks in anesthetized rat. We examined the relationship between SSVEP amplitude and the network topological properties for different stimulation frequencies, the synergetic dynamic changes of the amplitude and topological properties in each rat, the network properties of the control state, and the individual difference of SSVEP network attributes existing among rats. All these aspects consistently indicate that SSVEP response is closely correlated with network properties, the reorganization of the background network plays a crucial role in SSVEP production, and the background network may provide a physiological marker for evaluating the potential of SSVEP generation.

Show MeSH