Limits...
Comparison of muscle activity patterns of transfemoral amputees and control subjects during walking.

Wentink EC, Prinsen EC, Rietman JS, Veltink PH - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2013)

Bottom Line: In this study EMG activity during gait of the upper leg muscles of six transfemoral amputees, measured inside their own socket, was compared to that of five controls.For the subsequent (pre) swing phase the main differences were found in muscle activity patterns of the prosthetic limb, more muscles were active during this phase and/or with prolonged duration.The overall inter-subject variability was larger in amputees compared to controls.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Biomedical Signals and Systems group, University of Twente, Drienerlolaan 5, Enschede 7500 AE, The Netherlands. e.c.wentink@utwente.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Only few studies have looked at electromyography (EMG) during prosthetic gait. Differences in EMG between normal and prosthetic gait for stance and swing phase were never separately analyzed. These differences can give valuable information if and how muscle activity changes in prosthetic gait.

Methods: In this study EMG activity during gait of the upper leg muscles of six transfemoral amputees, measured inside their own socket, was compared to that of five controls. On and off timings for stance and swing phase were determined together with the level of co-activity and inter-subject variability.

Results and conclusions: Gait phase changes in amputees mainly consisted of an increased double support phase preceding the prosthetic stance phase. For the subsequent (pre) swing phase the main differences were found in muscle activity patterns of the prosthetic limb, more muscles were active during this phase and/or with prolonged duration. The overall inter-subject variability was larger in amputees compared to controls.

Show MeSH
Gait phases. Gait phases for controls and amputees, as percentages of one full stride. In black the swing phase, in light grey the stance phase and in dark grey the double support phases. The whiskers give one SD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750514&req=5

Figure 5: Gait phases. Gait phases for controls and amputees, as percentages of one full stride. In black the swing phase, in light grey the stance phase and in dark grey the double support phases. The whiskers give one SD.

Mentions: In Table 2 the average duration of a stride and the different gait phases in percentages of a stride are presented. A shift of all phases can be seen for amputees, Figure 5. For amputees the relative duration of the stance phase of intact limb, the prosthetic swing phase and the (first) double support phase before the prosthetic single stance phase are significantly increased compared to controls. The (second) double support phase of amputees before the prosthetic swing phase, is shortened but not statistically significant. Compared to the total stance phase, this “second” double stance phase is equal for both controls and amputees (15%). No differences were found between TFA and TKA, nor between mechanical and micro-processor-controlled (MPC) knees.


Comparison of muscle activity patterns of transfemoral amputees and control subjects during walking.

Wentink EC, Prinsen EC, Rietman JS, Veltink PH - J Neuroeng Rehabil (2013)

Gait phases. Gait phases for controls and amputees, as percentages of one full stride. In black the swing phase, in light grey the stance phase and in dark grey the double support phases. The whiskers give one SD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750514&req=5

Figure 5: Gait phases. Gait phases for controls and amputees, as percentages of one full stride. In black the swing phase, in light grey the stance phase and in dark grey the double support phases. The whiskers give one SD.
Mentions: In Table 2 the average duration of a stride and the different gait phases in percentages of a stride are presented. A shift of all phases can be seen for amputees, Figure 5. For amputees the relative duration of the stance phase of intact limb, the prosthetic swing phase and the (first) double support phase before the prosthetic single stance phase are significantly increased compared to controls. The (second) double support phase of amputees before the prosthetic swing phase, is shortened but not statistically significant. Compared to the total stance phase, this “second” double stance phase is equal for both controls and amputees (15%). No differences were found between TFA and TKA, nor between mechanical and micro-processor-controlled (MPC) knees.

Bottom Line: In this study EMG activity during gait of the upper leg muscles of six transfemoral amputees, measured inside their own socket, was compared to that of five controls.For the subsequent (pre) swing phase the main differences were found in muscle activity patterns of the prosthetic limb, more muscles were active during this phase and/or with prolonged duration.The overall inter-subject variability was larger in amputees compared to controls.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science, Biomedical Signals and Systems group, University of Twente, Drienerlolaan 5, Enschede 7500 AE, The Netherlands. e.c.wentink@utwente.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Only few studies have looked at electromyography (EMG) during prosthetic gait. Differences in EMG between normal and prosthetic gait for stance and swing phase were never separately analyzed. These differences can give valuable information if and how muscle activity changes in prosthetic gait.

Methods: In this study EMG activity during gait of the upper leg muscles of six transfemoral amputees, measured inside their own socket, was compared to that of five controls. On and off timings for stance and swing phase were determined together with the level of co-activity and inter-subject variability.

Results and conclusions: Gait phase changes in amputees mainly consisted of an increased double support phase preceding the prosthetic stance phase. For the subsequent (pre) swing phase the main differences were found in muscle activity patterns of the prosthetic limb, more muscles were active during this phase and/or with prolonged duration. The overall inter-subject variability was larger in amputees compared to controls.

Show MeSH