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Evaluation of a birth preparation program on lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence, anxiety and exercise: a randomized controlled trial.

Miquelutti MA, Cecatti JG, Makuch MY - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2013)

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness and safety of a birth preparation programme to minimize lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence, anxiety, and increase physical activity during pregnancy as well as to compare its effects on perinatal outcomes comparing two groups of iparous women.Secondary outcomes were perinatal variables.The risk of urinary incontinence in BPP participants was significantly lower at 30 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 42.7%, CG 62.2%; relative risk [RR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.93) and at 36 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 41.2%, CG 68.4%; RR 0.60; 95%CI 0.45-0.81).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 618113083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Antenatal preparation programmes are recommended worldwide to promote a healthy pregnancy and greater autonomy during labor and delivery, prevent physical discomfort and high levels of anxiety. The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness and safety of a birth preparation programme to minimize lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence, anxiety, and increase physical activity during pregnancy as well as to compare its effects on perinatal outcomes comparing two groups of iparous women.

Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 197 low risk iparous women aged 16 to 40 years, with gestational age ≥ 18 weeks. Participants were randomly allocated to participate in a birth preparation programme (BPP; n=97) or a control group (CG; n=100). The intervention was performed on the days of prenatal visits, and consisted of physical exercises, educational activities and instructions on exercises to be performed at home. The control group followed a routine of prenatal care. Primary outcomes were urinary incontinence, lumbopelvic pain, physical activity, and anxiety. Secondary outcomes were perinatal variables.

Results: The risk of urinary incontinence in BPP participants was significantly lower at 30 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 42.7%, CG 62.2%; relative risk [RR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.93) and at 36 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 41.2%, CG 68.4%; RR 0.60; 95%CI 0.45-0.81). Participation in the BPP encouraged women to exercise during pregnancy (p=0.009). No difference was found between the groups regarding to anxiety level, lumbopelvic pain, type or duration of delivery and weight or vitality of the newborn infant.

Conclusions: The BPP was effective in controlling urinary incontinence and to encourage the women to exercise during pregnancy with no adverse effects to pregnant women or the fetuses.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov, (NCT01155804).

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of the allocation and follow-up of the participants in the study.
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Figure 1: Flowchart of the allocation and follow-up of the participants in the study.

Mentions: For the study, 208 eligible pregnant women were identified. Three women refused the invitation to participate and 205 women were randomised into the intervention and control groups. Eight women were excluded post-randomisation. A total of 197 women participated in the study, 97 allocated to the intervention group and 100 to the control group. Figure 1 shows randomisation process regarding the groups and the follow-up of the participants in accordance with the flowchart suggested by the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) [24]. Apart from the 8 initial cases of exclusion following randomisation, the only data that were lost was secondary data referring to delivery and the newborn infant in 48 cases (24%) in which delivery occurred in other institutions. There was no difference between the groups regarding the sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics (Table 2). The women in the BPP intervention group participated in a median of 5 meetings (range 2 to 10 meetings).


Evaluation of a birth preparation program on lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence, anxiety and exercise: a randomized controlled trial.

Miquelutti MA, Cecatti JG, Makuch MY - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2013)

Flowchart of the allocation and follow-up of the participants in the study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3750492&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart of the allocation and follow-up of the participants in the study.
Mentions: For the study, 208 eligible pregnant women were identified. Three women refused the invitation to participate and 205 women were randomised into the intervention and control groups. Eight women were excluded post-randomisation. A total of 197 women participated in the study, 97 allocated to the intervention group and 100 to the control group. Figure 1 shows randomisation process regarding the groups and the follow-up of the participants in accordance with the flowchart suggested by the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) [24]. Apart from the 8 initial cases of exclusion following randomisation, the only data that were lost was secondary data referring to delivery and the newborn infant in 48 cases (24%) in which delivery occurred in other institutions. There was no difference between the groups regarding the sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics (Table 2). The women in the BPP intervention group participated in a median of 5 meetings (range 2 to 10 meetings).

Bottom Line: The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness and safety of a birth preparation programme to minimize lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence, anxiety, and increase physical activity during pregnancy as well as to compare its effects on perinatal outcomes comparing two groups of iparous women.Secondary outcomes were perinatal variables.The risk of urinary incontinence in BPP participants was significantly lower at 30 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 42.7%, CG 62.2%; relative risk [RR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.93) and at 36 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 41.2%, CG 68.4%; RR 0.60; 95%CI 0.45-0.81).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 618113083-970, Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Antenatal preparation programmes are recommended worldwide to promote a healthy pregnancy and greater autonomy during labor and delivery, prevent physical discomfort and high levels of anxiety. The objective of this study was to evaluate effectiveness and safety of a birth preparation programme to minimize lumbopelvic pain, urinary incontinence, anxiety, and increase physical activity during pregnancy as well as to compare its effects on perinatal outcomes comparing two groups of iparous women.

Methods: A randomized controlled trial was conducted with 197 low risk iparous women aged 16 to 40 years, with gestational age ≥ 18 weeks. Participants were randomly allocated to participate in a birth preparation programme (BPP; n=97) or a control group (CG; n=100). The intervention was performed on the days of prenatal visits, and consisted of physical exercises, educational activities and instructions on exercises to be performed at home. The control group followed a routine of prenatal care. Primary outcomes were urinary incontinence, lumbopelvic pain, physical activity, and anxiety. Secondary outcomes were perinatal variables.

Results: The risk of urinary incontinence in BPP participants was significantly lower at 30 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 42.7%, CG 62.2%; relative risk [RR] 0.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.51-0.93) and at 36 weeks of pregnancy (BPP 41.2%, CG 68.4%; RR 0.60; 95%CI 0.45-0.81). Participation in the BPP encouraged women to exercise during pregnancy (p=0.009). No difference was found between the groups regarding to anxiety level, lumbopelvic pain, type or duration of delivery and weight or vitality of the newborn infant.

Conclusions: The BPP was effective in controlling urinary incontinence and to encourage the women to exercise during pregnancy with no adverse effects to pregnant women or the fetuses.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov, (NCT01155804).

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus